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clarkpm4242

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Everything posted by clarkpm4242

  1. IC4677 is part of the outer halo and probably visible through a 15" scope.
  2. Also look for 'nothing' Dark Nebulae! Barnard's 'E' in Aquila The dust around the Scutum Star Cloud and 2 small patches in Small Sagittarius Star Cloud. Good hunting Paul
  3. All below should start with 'In my opinion..' I've had an Obsession 18, Orion (US) 14 and now own a Sumerian 16 Alkaid. Also much experience with Obsession and Sumerian 15, 18, 20 & 22s (UC or Classic). Assuming that you are going for new. Sourced within the EU. Avoid the mass market scopes. They may weight a ton and be just not well constructed. My 14 Orion weighed more than my current 16... The 18 is a very useable size. Take one step back from the biggest that you can afford and go up in quality e.g. mirror coatings. A more portable solution. The 18 Canopus structure from Sumerian is great. Then you have to deal with OO UK...can be a pain but produce good optics. Also match your good optics with good eyepieces. Yours (and others) mileage may vary! Good luck!!! Cheers Paul
  4. This SPA page gives the UK observer perspective... http://www.popastro.com/meteor/activity/activity.php?id_pag=228 Hope for some clear skies! Cheers Paul
  5. I have observed from here on several occasions... https://www.google.co.uk/maps/place/Santa+Cruz+de+Tenerife,+Spain/@28.2381018,-16.6971622,1049m/data=!3m1!1e3!4m2!3m1!1s0xc41cceccc254171:0x43111473d277e52e!6m1!1e1 ...warm clothes and wind break! Also managed to take TMB 92SS APO etc. in hand luggage. Heavy duty dismantled photo tripod and tablet mount in luggage. Used taped on filled water bottles as counter-weights. Good luck!! Paul P.S. Don't think any booking is required for the Caldera...
  6. Very nicely put. Am a fan of http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bortle_scale I also have some favourite 'test' DSOs. Clear & dark skies Paul
  7. Yes, 60mm is plenty! I managed a full 110 object single night Messier Marathon using a Borg 60 (older non-ED version) and 24mm Panoptic from Tenerife a few years back. Used a birding/hide mount that clamps onto stable objects. Also worked well as a very wide field scope for objects such as Barnard's Loop. Yosemite is magical!!! Spent 6 months there climbing in my youth. Hope you have a great time! ...cheers, Paul
  8. 110% with Olly on the trailers. Have to be big, good quality suspension, probably 4 wheeled. My solution was wheelbarrow handles, ramps and an estate car with NO rear lip on the back door. A key feature! It is also possible to use the seat belt mountings to use a pulley/winch system. Hope it goes well! Paul
  9. As Russ said, daylight re-appraisal of the situation is so much easier. Don't be afraid of taking the mirror out of the cell, if necessary. It is fine as long as you think it through beforehand. Good luck. Paul
  10. Hi Richard You can loop the tensioning cord various ways to get the required 'balance'. It works on my Alkaid with the 31 Nag/Paracorr combo. Cheers Paul
  11. Yes, Canada. An excellent 'Best Of' list. They also have a Challenge List..!
  12. How did I forget this! This is a brilliant list when you have aperture to use http://messier.seds.org/xtra/similar/rasc-ngc.html Paul
  13. I'll 2nd the Herschel 400 as the next step. I used an OMC 140 to bag them after the Messiers. I seem to remember that it doesn't have the really low objects like M7. Good hunting Paul
  14. Yes, naked eye, OIII or UHC... ...from the Elan Valley, obviously Also, from 2000+metres up in the Canaries (cheating, I know). Good luck Paul
  15. Hi From my experience, I think that you will be pushing it (a lot) under mag.5.6 skies, even with a 16". I think all my observations have been 6+ and on very transparent nights. H beta is the best filter however the standard UHCs have OIII and Hbeta band passes and bring out more than filter free attempts. Eyepieces, pick one that keeps the brightest stars out of the FOV. I found it to be the size I expected. Not big or small. Under marginal conditions all you realise is that there is an area where you are consistently 'not' seeing nebulosity. My best view was through a 24" with an H beta from the Caldera on Tenerife, it was a black chess piece on a white background Good luck and very clear skies. Cheers Paul
  16. Hi Nice write up. Hope it continues to perform as good as it looks!! The primary has a wire sling for low altitude support and 6 'floating' support points. These are on each end of the 3 metal pivot bars below the mirror (they aren't counterweights). Cheers Paul
  17. Hi I've found the Flame way easier than the HH. Good transparency and a dark sky required but nowhere in the same 'difficulty' league. I remember having a great view through an OMC 140. That had the advantage of keeping the nearby bright star out of the FOV..! Good hunting Paul
  18. Hi My understanding is that unless the area around the primary is illuminated (and the secondary can 'see' this) and there isn't any unwanted light directly entering the focuser from the opposite side of the UTA... ...a light shroud has no impact, apart from turning the scope into a sail. Hope that makes sense. I tend to observe from dark sites and don't use a light shroud. I do recommend a hood covering the eyepiece and head though. Can make a world of difference and really isolates you from the surrounding reality. Becomes a real spacewalk Cheers Paul
  19. Great you could have a 'trial' run for that special first light dark sky trip! I rarely set up at home, usually to sort out the kit. Saves so much frustration if you're under a clear and dark sky. No faffing about. From your pics on the equipment thread, the scope does look the business! Cheers Paul
  20. Hi I've observed it several times from up in the caldera on Tenerife, but only once from the Elan Valley, Wales. This was through a 92mm TMB APO at very low mag ~x16, using a 31 mm Nagler. Filters do not help. This gives about 5 degree fov. Appears as the palest white stain. Obviously, the clearest and darkest skies are a must... ...good luck. Paul
  21. Excellent view naked eye from the dark NE Yorkshire Dales last night. Also through 15x50 Canon IS binoculars. Didn't have to get out of the car... ...good hunting! Cheers Paul
  22. I note you say that weight isn't a problem however... ...I would go for a GEM option as they do break down into lighter components. The larger CPC and LX options are bulky. YMMV Cheers Paul
  23. Hi there I am very short-sighted (no jokes) -11 and 2 dioptres of astigmatism. This is what works for me, plus a few comments... - using thin, high refractive index glass long distance specs - using eyepieces with an eye relief of 15+mm e.g. Delos - trying to remember to fold down eye cup if required - a unit power RDF or Telrad (with specs) - a tablet with planetarium program of choice (Sky Safari), zooming in an config. can make it bigger (night mode & screen filters retain dark adaptation) - DO NOT have surgery - a short trial of contacts without fully dark adapted eyes (wide pupil) will not give you an accurate feel for there good/bad points - DO NOT have surgery - varifocals will not work owing to varying correction and scope/eye positions - DO NOT have surgery There are still occasions of frustration however, using familiar specs that stay on all the time gives you a good base to observe from. Hope this helps, others may have differing opinions... ...good luck. Cheers Paul
  24. Yes, great report and piccie Mike! I uploaded a couple of GoPro vids to Youtube recently, there is a public/private setting..? Cheers Paul
  25. I always attempt to optimise the viewing of any object: - catch them before they start getting to low in the west - wait for them to rise high in the east - avoid the light polluted parts of the sky - wait for circumpolar objects to be high in the north - look at bright objects last (retaining dark adaption) ...enjoy the journey Paul
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