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iam4208

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About iam4208

  • Rank
    Nebula

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  • Location
    Central Scotland
  1. Excellent drawings. You must have fantastic patience to capture the changes over such a long time period. I managed to get to a decent site near Haddington, Scotland, where the sky remained clear, but wind and poor seeing meant I could only clearly discern one shadow. It has made me more aware of this kind of event and I will try to catch more transits in the future. Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
  2. Lots of interesting opinions on here and many ring true for me. I've "progressed" from a 6" to an 8" and finally to a 10" reflector (Truss-tube Dob) and found that you would quickly adapt what you observed based on what you discovered the scope was capable of. The simple truth is you can get great enjoyment out of just about any decent scope or binoculars as long as you choose carefully what to observe.
  3. I jumped from 8" to 10" only because I was getting a used package with some top quality eyepieces. My advice would be that good quality eyepieces are just as important as the scope aperture. If you are working to a certain budget, I'd be tempted to invest some of it in eyepieces or at least recognise that you will discover the limitations of standard eyepieces pretty quickly (especially if you look through someone else's). Good luck!
  4. Welcome to the forum. You'll find plenty of advice about equipment on here. Hopefully, it won't be overwhelming. I started out with binoculars and a planisphere and peered down other people's telescopes for a while. Only when I was sure I wanted to get serious did I buy a telescope. Good luck
  5. Welcome to the forum. Wow, sounds like you have a pretty clear idea what you want to do. I've only been doing this for a couple of years, so I have very limited knowledge on the subject, but why such a narrow focus?
  6. Can't do much until the weather improves. Sent from my HTC EVO 3D X515m using Tapatalk
  7. Okay, a fellow observer has made some progress with this scope, by doing some collimation/alignment of the secondary. Unfortunately, the poor weather in Scotland has scuppered all opportunities to conduct a star test. The saga continues..
  8. Lol, Lorne, you were lucky to get it back, but as you can see, I'm thinking seriously about eyepiece upgrades.
  9. Hi Mike, that's an excellent picture. Can you give me more detail on how you took it? I'm mildly interested in astrophotography and the camera you are using seems very reasonably priced. However, I have an 8" Dobsonian, with no goto and I'd be interested in knowing if I could get into imaging with my gear and the high frame rate camera you are using.
  10. Wow, lots of fantastic answers to a pretty popular subject and no wonder. There are so many ways to go about the task of building an eyepiece set. I can see me referring to this info over the coming weeks as I look to build mine. Thanks everyone.
  11. A pretty decent capture considering. Well done.
  12. Wow, this is an excellent image. Very good detail and colour. Good to see you mentioning NGC5195. Apparently Charles Messier himself never really made it clear whether he considered the galaxy pair to be M51 or just the big one. They do sometimes get referred to as M51A and M51B. No matter, your image is far better than what I see through my little 8" Dob. Very well done.
  13. Very nice images. I find Mars very disappointing to look at through the scope at the moment. Hopefully, in years to come it will be better placed and I can actually spot some of its features.
  14. Sounds like you're hooked just like the rest of us. I never tire of seeing Jupiter and the moons in a seemingly endless variety of orbital positions and I even managed to see a shadow transit very recently. If you think the skies are poor where you are try living in Central Scotland.
  15. Welcome to SGL. If you are looking to hook up with other fellow observers, I recommend joining the Central Scotland Observers Group (CSOG). We have a couple of dark sky sites over in the East/South East of Scotland and you'd be made very welcome. Also, if the forums don't help resolve an issue, you will find people willing to meet up and work with you to resolve it. I had an issue with collimating a non-standard Newtonian and I got a great deal of help out at a dark sky site from forum members.
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