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slickfonzy

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About slickfonzy

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    Star Forming

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  • Location
    Penrith, UK
  1. I've lost count of the number of times animals have made me jump when observing over the years. One of the most recent I can recall was something that made no noise at all - I was still setting up and turned round to see two inquisitive fox cubs sitting only two metres away, curiously watching what I was doing. It doesn't help that I'm naturally very jumpy anyway, I often tell my wife she needs to wear a bell, I get mild frights on a regular basis when she appears silently in the room behind me and starts talking to me!
  2. Thanks for that, I did wonder if it would be a little soft at F2.8, that's useful to know. My Canon doesn't get any exposure or focus feedback from the lens, but I guess it will just be a case of practice makes perfect!
  3. Many thanks for that. In terms of calibrating, do you mean the scale on the focus ring? I'd noticed that the focus scale is was way off, but it seems to be a common problem with the lens and a relatively easy fix (hopefully!).
  4. Lovely image, personally I think the cloud adds another element and some more colour to the image, and at least it was kind enough to avoid the meteor! I've just purchased a 14mm Samyang but have yet to use it in anger. Do you have any tips/advice regarding the lens? I must admit that I had a bit of a shock trying to focus it during the day, it's the first manual focus lens I've had since the days of my Olympus OM-20 when I was a nipper!
  5. Hi Alex, no problem, thanks for getting back to me. Ian
  6. Crikey, I'd better get my stocking up if that's what Father Christmas is delivering this year!
  7. Hi Ian, Although I don't have any personal experience with the Heritage 100P (I'm sure others will be along shortly who have), it is likely the best buy for your budget. Skywatcher are a respected brand and the 100P is likely to outperform anything you might pick up in [insert your favourite supermarket brand here]. In terms of wearing glasses to observe, I can sympathise! Firstly, do you know whether your daughter's prescription corrects for astigmatism (if you have a copy of her prescription, it will have some numbers in the Cylinder column if so)? If it doesn't, then she won't need to wear her glasses to observe - the focuser on the telescope will deal with any short-sightedness. If they are needed for astigmatism, wearing them to observe would probably be preferred. In that case, most eyepieces have a fold-down rubber eye cup to allow those wearing glasses to get closer to the eyepiece. FLO have an unboxing video, which will give you an idea of exactly what you'd be buying...https://www.firstlightoptics.com/beginner-telescopes/skywatcher-heritage-100p-tabletop-dobsonian.html Ian
  8. Hi Alex, sorry to resurrect an old thread, but did you go for the SkyTech CLS filter in the end? If so, would you recommend it? I'm looking to buy an EOS clip filter and at half the price of the Astronomik it's very tempting! Ian
  9. Very nice, only another 150 panes or so to go for the mosaic
  10. Just checked, seems I made the mistake sorry! Running through the calculations again I get 5.4 hours, rather than 13 days - is that the same as you have worked out? distance (traveller's frame) = s = 39 AU = 5.834*(10^12) metres c is 299,792,458 m/s, so traveller's speed = v = 0.99999999*c time (traveller's frame) = s /v = [5.834*(10^12)] / 0.99999999*c which gives a time of 19,460 seconds, so divide by 60 for minutes, 60 again for hours, gives 5.4 hours.
  11. That's correct, from the traveller's frame of reference they have only travelled 39 AU. So, in their frame of reference, their trip only takes them about 13 days (ignoring acceleration/deceleration periods, and assuming my calculations are correct!). Sounds perfect! However, it's important to remember the concurrent time dilation. The trip only takes about 13 days according to the traveller's clock, on their spaceship with them. However, for a stationary observer watching them, the trip still takes just over four years, according to the stationary observer's clock. Therefore, as with the twin paradox, although only 13 days has passed for the traveller, for anyone sitting back home on Earth, over four years have passed.
  12. Thanks, Gina, looks a lovely sky, unfortunately my experience was much the same as yours last night joncrawf. Hoping for some clear sky tonight, looks OK at the moment, but the forecast isn't good.
  13. Thank you both for the info, that's great. Thanks joncrawf for the link, we'll definitely check out that road. I had my suspicions about the car parks, used for other night time activities I suspect. Your story of the helicopter incident did make me chuckle!
  14. I'm currently staying for a couple of nights in Taunton and then on to Oakhampton for a week - can anyone local to the area recommended some good dark sites, perhaps for some Perseid watching? Thanks in advance!
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