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Chinapig

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About Chinapig

  • Rank
    Star Forming

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Sussex coast, UK
  1. Chinapig

    Observing Comet 46P

    After a few fruitless attempts over the last week or so, I found 46P tonight for the first time, using 10x50s to sweep the area down a bit and left a bit from Menkar. A vague splodge with soft edges sprang into view. Phew - that's it! Delighted... Upped the glass ante with 15x70s, tripod mounted with a trigger grip, and had a long, lingering look, thoroughly enjoying the sight. Having found the comet, I'd planned to try some imaging, but clouds decided it was bedtime...
  2. Chinapig

    Mirrorless MFT YI ?

    Regarding mount adapters, if you mean could you fit the YI camera body to a telescope, yes you could. I sometimes use an Olympus micro four thirds camera (an OMD) for astro photography, fitted on the back of a small refractor with a T-mount to m43 adapter. I've never heard of YI cameras before, and it's worth searching out some reviews first: https://www.dpreview.com/reviews/yi-m1 As an alternative to the YI model, it might be worth looking at what deals you can find on Olympus or Panasonic cameras that use the same m43 lens mount - perhaps a bit more of a known quantity. The YI camera with more recent firmware updates, which I gather became available after the inital launch, might be fine though. Hard to tell, as not much info out there about this camera.
  3. Yup, can echo that comment re southern hemisphere. Visiting family in Oz last year was a phenomenal experience. I vowed that next time - maybe in a couple of years - I'd take the best and most easily transportable scope I could afford. A bad back has also made me think very hard about the kind of astronomy I can comfortably cope with. On both counts, a Tak FC-76DCU was the solution, plus the 1.7 extender. Very light, versatile and incredibly sharp, and breaks down into short tubes that all fit into a carry-on friendly camera bag. Delightful. Haven't had the chance to compare it to a TV85, but it gives my ED80 a decent run for its money - to my eyes, the Tak's a tad sharper. My Starwave 102mm f11's extra aperture gives it an edge on some targets, but I've now very reluctantly decided to sell the Starwave to keep my back happier. The Tak keeps my eyes pretty happy too!
  4. Craig I do indeed have one of these. A Starwave 102mm f11, which hasn't been out of the astro cupboard for quite a while and in the last 24 hours or so have pretty much decided to sell. I'll take some pics in the morning and post on here with full details, or by all means bung me a PM. It's the white-tube version, and I do have original packaging, although I'd be much happier with collection. I'd be looking for around £225. Cheers Simon
  5. Chinapig

    Widefield Orion

    Gorgeous image! Amazing how useful a nifty fifty can be... Really fab result.
  6. Hi there I’d love one of them - will PM you! Cheers Simon
  7. I've yet to challenge its capabilites on doubles very much - although Albireo looked blue-and-gold gorgeous - but it's stunning on open clusters, and the brighter nebulae. For example, the fuzzy patches of M35, 36, 37 & 38 in my 8x42 bins became beautifully resolved in the little Tak. The Lagoon and Triffid nebulae equally rewarding. My first-light experience with the scope was at my local astro-club observing night. We set up early, trying to catch a late season glimpse of Jupiter, as well as Saturn. Folks commented on the sharp clarity of the view on both planets. I'd set up next to a guy with a 127mm triplet, and yes, sure, the view through the larger triplet did show more detail on Saturn, but not THAT much. I was delighted! And a few weeks back, with the CQ 1.7x extender in place, I had my best-ever view of Mars. The Hercules cluster, M13, was also none too shabby with the CQ, while the Moon is a knockout. At first, when looking at the Moon for the first time, I instinctively reached for the ISO setting to tame the exposure - it was that bright! And then realised I wasn't using my camera... Ok, it was an age thing ; ) The only real challenge I've had with FC-76DCU is getting focus with my existing 1.25" diagonal. A bit of a juggling act with distance pieces helped resolve it, but I achieved nirvana by buying the Tak 1.25" prism diagonal. Crystal clear, and its short light-path works a treat. Well worth the bit extra. I've added an ADM quick-release finder adapter to the kit, simply to make break-down and transport easier. A perfect fit, and a neat solution. You do have to remember that the scope's aperture is only 76mm, and it obviously can't do the impossible. But I note that since buying it, both my ED80 and my f11 4" frac have both remained in the cupboard, as has my 6" SCT. Hope that helps.
  8. I can't comment on the 60mm route as such, but for the similar reasons of portability and flexibility - and anticipated image quality - I recently opted for a FC-76DCU, with the CQ 1.7x extender. Early days, and I've not had a chance to do much serious imaging with it yet, but so far I couldn't be happier. Visually, it's razor sharp, with imperceptible CA, and - to my eyes - it's capable of resolving a surprising amount of detail. If you want a larger image scale, screw in the extender. Whether in f7.5 or f 12.7 mode, it's extremely light, easily mounted, and a joy to work with. My dodgy back loves it as much as my eyeballs! And it all fits in a carry-on friendly photo rucksack. Wonderful...
  9. Chinapig

    Sun Ha Prom super-zoomed

    Fire dragons at play - wonderful image!
  10. Chinapig

    90mm or 102mm Frac and an EQ mount

    Hi there I have a Starwave 102mm f11 refractor, classic white OTA, in standard trim with rings and dovetail. Have original packaging, but would prefer collection - much safer! PM me if that would be of interest. Cheers
  11. Cheers for the feedback - it's the lying down and gazing bit that makes my back and neck say "Yeah, go on, try a parallelogram!" If your Orion ED80 is reasonably well behaved, I should be ok. Many thanks.
  12. Many thanks for the info. Will try to track down that CN thread. Yes, being able to use the scope in straight-through mode certainly appeals, particularly at some angles. My scope, with finder and typical eyepiece, weighs approx 50% of that mount's quoted limit, so I'm hopeful. Glad to hear the set-up worked well for you!
  13. Will do! I'm a little way off from pulling the trigger on a suitable mount, but have planning to go the Ukrainian route for a while. Decision getting closer...
  14. That's good to know - many thanks! My Equinox 80 is the heaviest scope I'd like to try, but fortunately the new 76mm is quite a but lighter. Hmmm... a Heritage 130mm? Quite an idea!
  15. While enjoying first light with a lightweight 76mm refractor, mounted on a simple alt-az setup (Tecnosky Cubo), it struck me that given my advancing years and dodgy back, a parallelogram mount might well be worth a try. I.e. My head could remain at a relatively constant height above ground level - whether seated or standing - but the scope could be pushed up and down depending on the target's altitude. I have low-power wide-field sweeping more in mind than high-mag planetary stuff, but I'm curious to know if anyone's tried it, and what benefits or pitfalls they encountered. Is there too much shake and wobble to make this approach practical, or is there a glorious sense of freedom in being able to wave your scope around the sky like half a binocular? Any feedback welcomed. Cheers all Simon
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