Jump to content

Stargazers Lounge Uses Cookies

Like most websites, SGL uses cookies in order to deliver a secure, personalised service, to provide social media functions and to analyse our traffic. Continued use of SGL indicates your acceptance of our cookie policy.

Ultrapenguin

Members
  • Content Count

    148
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

60 Excellent

About Ultrapenguin

  • Rank
    Star Forming

Profile Information

  • Location
    Portsmouth
  1. Possibly the best Orion image I have ever seen, not over coloured just right!
  2. Hi all, Sorry about the delay replying I have been traveling around India, update on my update. I do not generally remove the roof sections completely when observing although I could quite easily as they just slide out of the runners. My prefered mode of operation is shown below, both roof sections withdrawn, they are balanced quite nicely although it may not look like it, they are extremely heavy at the point the two sections meet due to strengthening bars and this makes the centre of balance very close to the left hand side as seen below. This is the link to the runners used http://www.screwfix.com/p/ball-bearing-drawer-runners-550mm/20420 Below is a couple of close up shots of the runners. This one shows the strengthening bars quite nicely. This is a more wide angle view You may note the slight turn up of the edge of the roof overlap section that enables the roof overlap to slide over the other side roof section when closing. For security both roof sections are held down by clips outside but I additional put in two security bolts to hold the roof sections together when closed up, so far it has withstood 4very heavy rain and 60mph gales. There are gaps where the two sections meet and also where the runner is not as long as the shed but to be honest I have found these not to be a problem, it has also been suggested to me that this may be the reason I do not get condensation. I used heavy duty pop rivets to secure the runners to the roof/shed as this gave a strong mechanical joint and also a low profile one essential if a ball bearing runner is sliding over it. Below are some images taken from this observatory so far in less than favorable conditions. I really can't wait for those dark winter nights. Using my observatory is a hoot! ^^ get it...
  3. I have an update, after a couple of weeks of lifting the roof section off every night i realised that long term a more practical (and quick/quiet) solution was required. My neighbors did not thank me for the clangs and clattering as i replaced the roof sections and secured them. So I purchased 4 x heavy duty drawer runners (captive ball bearing type and I have fitted these after modifying them to remove the end stops, they give me the ability to open the roof to create 1200 cm opening enough to give a really good sweep of the sky. The nice part is they are totally silent in operation and require a mouse sized effort to slide the sections apart. Cost for all four was £18 not expensive but it took a good few hours to fit them.
  4. That really is a cracker Olly, you can begin to see filament structure in your image very impressive.
  5. That's a cracker of an image ccd, I am also very surprised by the results modern DSLR's can achieve. To give some hope for others, although my image is no where near as nice as yours it was taken from a very light polluted garden with a 6 inch scope and a canon 1100d I purchased from ebay for £125. So you can get half decent images with basic equipment especially if you use a modern DSLR. I still really like your image though ccd and I am dreaming about what kind of visual views you must get through that 12 inch scope!
  6. Hi all, thought I would post the latest image from my new observatory. Single 30 second exposure iso 6400 on a SW150pl with tracking motors but no guiding.
  7. Yes they really are 30 second single exposures although the 1100D is capable of 6400 iso and I also use a LP filter, believe it or not these were taken from a garden surrounded by street lights! You really can do AP even if you are in a horribly lit area :-)
  8. The roof sections are very light an easy lift for me and I am no athlete, condensation does not appear to be an issue at the moment and so far I have been able to make use of two 2-3 hour clear patches to do some AP which I would not even of contemplated before. I have also found the sides of the OBSY are shielding my scope from stray LP and have solved the issues with gradient I was having with earlier images. I have also added a cheap stool and small table to allow me to use a laptop to control my camera. So far I am very pleased.
  9. Still setting up the equipment in my new Observatory (shed in the back garden) and I thought I would share some single frames 30 second exposures. I am still having some alignment issues so please forgive the star trailing. Comet Jacques M3 NGC6207 can also be seen (only just) in this single frame just above and to the right of M3 NGC6207 is mag 12.1 so I am very pleased to get that in a single 30s exposure. M57 The Ring Nebula
  10. Good suggestion about potential grass and weed control I will look to do that, regarding condensation the truth is I do not know yet the observatory/shed is only a couple of days old and as such I have no infromation on which to base an opinion. Several other people have mentioned it as a potential problem and as such I will keep a close eye on the situation, it has been suggested to me that polystyrene sheets may resolve the problem if it occurs and my intention for fixing them would be hot melt glue gun but for the moment I will wait and see. Thanks for the advice and clear skies to you all.
  11. Hi all, THought I would share with you my micro observatory build, it's nothing like the ones normally on here to be honest its not much more than a shelter for the scope and a solid footing for the mount but it serves the purpose. No more will I struggle out of the patio doors with my mount and scope and spend ages aligning to find teh clound in the mean time has drifted in, now I can be ready in about 2 mins! Anyway first i laid a patio, on a foundation of sand (this allows settlement and means any imperfections can be fixed) Next I purchased a £159.99 metal shed from the Billy Oh range, I choose this type because the roof can be made in two separate and reasonably solid parts making it easy to remove. The build itself was easy and once together the shed is nice and solid, I screwed mine down to the patio slabs for stability and also we don't want it blowing away now. Once the bottom part was built I fixed spring clips to hold the roof sections on as seen below; Now I can remove either side of the roof or the entire roof if I desire The scope is still on its basic EQ3-2 mount which is aligned and placed inside but I have plans to remove a slab inside and build a concrete pier. Now shielded from wind and with a reasonable sweep of the sky I am as happy as an astronomer with a new observatory as they say and having spent just under £200 all in I am pretty chuffed and best of all as the slabs are laid on sand if I feel the need I can take the whole thing apart and move it!
  12. I an confirm the Eskimo Nebular does in fact look just like a blue snowball, I imaged it recently although not as well as the above and I also verified with astrometry because I too was confused by its look. Taken with Skywatcher 150pl motorised but no tracking, canon 300d. 10 x 30 second exposures iso 1600, Looking at the above picture I can see that mine is overexposed, nice image.
  13. Hi all, thought I would post my image of the running man and partial Orion, it was taken with a skywatcher 150Pl and a canon 300d the scope was motorised but had no guiding or goto. The image was made up of 72 subs taken over two different nights unfortunately the camera angle was different on the second night so it has multiple diffraction spikes. I am very pleased it's my best DSO yet and even the multiple diffraction spikes don't look too bad, anyway thought I would share to get advice and maybe give some encouragement to other newbies.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.