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dunc

New Members
  • Content Count

    6
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13 Good

About dunc

  • Rank
    Vacuum

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Interests
    Astronomy (Duh!), fettling and tinkering, doing stuff, the beach, walking, cycling, having a nice time.
  • Location
    Manche, France
  1. I have derotated Jupiter many times but never bothered with Saturn for the reasons noted above. My first observation is you haven't set your location ( as mentioned above). WinJupos calulates the outline projection very accurately and you are not telling it you observed Saturn from Staffordshire. Therefore you can't line up your images and the outline well enough. I am sure your location also affects the de-rotation calulations as it works out were to move pixels tiny amounts. Accurate measurement is key. WinJupos was written for a scientific purpose, us planetary imagers using it for de-rotation of a set of consecutive images is a happy byproduct of whats needed to measure planetary features accurately. As the Jupos.org website says... "Most important software tool of the project is WinJUPOS written by Grischa Hahn. It is specially designed for amateur astronomers to record and analyse positions of features on Jupiter (and other planets), and to display them in suitable time-longitude or other coordinate systems. With its help you are able to process visual observations (Central Meridian transit timings, micrometer measurements) but also to measure electronic images (scanned photos, CCD or webcam images). Positions are written to a special JUPOS database, and can be queried, filtered and displayed graphically." Hope that helps, Duncan
  2. dunc

    Star Adventurer power

    Power banks expect to be charging something with a sizeable power drain, if not enough current is drawn they switch off. Attach something to the second port if it has one e.g. a phone that needs charging or rig up a dew heater to run off 5v with a USB connector - anything to draw current. HTH Duncan
  3. dunc

    veroboard/protyping board

    I've got a small stack of small veroboards for projects. I sympathise on the delivery charges front, in France free delivery seems an anathema. I seem to be able to order stuff from A..z.n UK for less postage a lot of the time and half the suppliers on ebay.fr are based in the UK anyway. And don't get me started on delivery times... sometimes it's quicker to order direct from China! BTW We still need to meet up for a coffee two... Not too many astronomers around here that I know of.
  4. Hi Andy, I'm Carole's friend of many years standing, we both belong to the Orpington Astronomical Society and post our astro images on the forum there. Carole sent me an email saying you were looking for fellow astronomy fiends in Manche, I live about 45 mins south of Cherbourg. I also have been hankering after a bit of astro-socialisation, but there doesn't seem to be a local association or club that's still active. I'll PM you. Duncan
  5. dunc

    Checking collimation in a SCT?

    Hi I'm Dunc and new to the SGL but a long time member of the Orpington Astronomical Society, The Duncan Mask document was drawn up by me based on something I read on the web, I used to have great difficulty collimating my 8" LX90. I still do as the dratted thing needs collimating every time it's used. I tried out of focus stars etc. but they were too imprecise especially given my far from perfect eyes. It takes 10 minutes, scissors and a piece of card to make the mask and it will save you hours *and* you will be certain your SCT is collimated correctly. My next astro kit project is to dismantle and reassemble the secondary holder to find out why it won't hold collimation. Should have done it years ago!
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