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scotastro

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Everything posted by scotastro

  1. Keep an eye on the secondhand kit on SGL or website U.K. Astronomy Buy & Sell for GOTO mounts, much cheaper than buying new. All you will need is to remove the tube rings on your current mount and attatch them to a dovetail bar (costs about £10). A GOTO system can make finding objects easier, but a 130mm scope is still quite small so there are a lot of objects in the database that will be beyond your scopes capabilities. Mike
  2. Great stuff, and the Soyuz went by about an hour earlier. So there are a total of 13 people zooming around the earth at the moment. Shuttle lands at 5.30pm (ish) check out NASA TV for live video. NASA - NASA TV Mike
  3. Not sure something to do with the change from high to low pressure. Shame it was SO cold with the strong wind - due to die out tonight with clear skies here. Mike
  4. Welcome Keiron from a fellow BIMS member. Mike
  5. Completely agree with Barkis. Small aperture scopes like these will allow you to see so few things you will be bored with it in no time. Keep saving until to can at least afford a 130mm or 150mm scope on a decent mount. Mike Mike
  6. For visual observing aligning the scope along the polar axis so that polaris is visible through the telescope is good enough. If you want to be a bit more accurate the of set for the NCP is 1/2 deg in the direction of Kockab (Beta UMi). If you have an EP which gives that FOV you can be a little more accurate. A "filter" EP in the scope would work, except the FOV of the scope is too small compare with that of a polar scope which is even wide than a finderscope. The EP would have to just show a few stars around Polaris. Mike
  7. Don't be too disappointed by the view. The planet is over 1200 million km away. The lines sticking out the sides are the rings which are virtually edge on at the moment and only a few tens of kilometers thick. You will not see the Cassini Division until the rings open up a bit in a year or so. Any star like objects close to the planet (in line with he rings) will be its moons, Titan is the brightest and so easiest to see. For some reason now that we are looking sideways on the colour bands on Saturn which are always subtle are even less obvious. I use a 16" Newt and there is hardly any colour visible with that. So like I said don't be disappointed. Mike
  8. One more planet, if your western horizon is clear, you will see Venus, it is the first thing to appear as it gets dark. It is closing in on the Sun so will not be visible much longer. Venus appears as a very thin crescent. Mike
  9. scotastro

    hi all

    Hello and welcome to SGL Mike
  10. If you have the focus correct for a planet so it is a well defined disc then the stars will be in focus too, no need to adjust the focuser at all. Mike
  11. Now the Moon is well out of the way had a look at Comet Lulin which is in Gemini. Tonight just east of delta Gem. It is still prominant and worth a look particularly with a bigger scope. Mike
  12. scotastro

    Hello

    Welcome to SGL Hope you get some good weather over during this week. Mike
  13. Now available : Flextube Dobs with Alt Az motorised mount. The mount is fitted with dual-axis servo motors and encoders in the base unit allowing Automatic Slewing and Tracking of celestial objects (similar to the single arm Auto mount). Even better the scope can be upgraded to a full GOTO system by the addition of a SynScan AZ handset in the near future. Apertures are 200mm, 250mm and 300mm. The prices are £300 higher than the basic Flextube models. Mike
  14. One of my fav objects -great image. The fuzziness you mentioned could be faint galaxy PGC 34279 nearby. Mike
  15. If you find the manual confusing the Meade website have some videos explainting the steps. http://www.meade.com/educational/etx%20videos/index.html Mike
  16. Have NASA TV running in the background while I readd posts. Astronauts just getting strapped in. Mike.
  17. I have a Dark Star 10" f6.3 which is a good deep sky and planetary scope. An f5 scope would have a lower magnification and wider field of view than the f6 for the same eyepiece. Following up on Mike P - the longer the focal length the easier it is to figure the glass if you are considering to build your own mirror. There are ATM websites for scope designs. Mike
  18. Most binoculars will take a bracket that will fit any tripod. The most important thing about the tripod is that it is stable and heavy enough to take the binoculars. Mike
  19. I have seen the kit for prices ranging from £400 to £150. I still think it's one of the most accurate GOTO systems and very neglected. Mike
  20. Found all sorts of new and old astronomy books over the years particularly in Oxfam, which seemed to have good book sections. Mike
  21. Confirmation codes consisting of numbers and letters (maybe upper or lower case) need to be typed in as you see them without spaces. Been an SPA member off and on since the JAS (Junior Astronomical Society) days meeting in Old Holburn. Mike
  22. Hi Martina Warm welcome to SGL from me in SW Scotland Mike
  23. The slo-mo knobs have always annoyed me as the clash with each other or mount. If you have your scope properly balanced you don't need to use the slo-mo controls at all. Just leave the axis locks off and move the scope gently where ever you want to go. If you only want one direction of movement then keep the other axis locked. Mike
  24. Watching Apollo 11 land on the Moon (when I was 11) completely captivated me. To see the later missions during the day, friends and I would secretly switch on a TV in one class room at school at lunchtime. As a kid I was read everything I could find about it space missions. When I ran out of material I started on astronomy books and that started a whole new interest. Thanks to NASA TV I watch Shuttle launches and just about anything else set skywards. Mike
  25. Welcome to SGL from me Mike (ex Wales)
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