Jump to content

Stargazers Lounge Uses Cookies

Like most websites, SGL uses cookies in order to deliver a secure, personalised service, to provide social media functions and to analyse our traffic. Continued use of SGL indicates your acceptance of our cookie policy.

sgl_imaging_challenge_banner_comet_46p_winners.thumb.jpg.b3d48fd93cbd17bff31f578b27cc6f0d.jpg

Heliocentric

New Members
  • Content Count

    19
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

10 Good

About Heliocentric

  • Rank
    Nebula
  1. No offense taken Glen. Thanks for the in depth explanation of your theory. I must say it is increasingly convincing, especially due to the lack of other convincing theories. I agree that the speed of the objects seems consistent with the camera movement, although I'm still on the fence whether all objects move horizontally (that is with the camera). It seems not, but I cannot say for sure. Nothing would be more convincing than footage showing similar effects that you describe. Occam's Razor works fine in simple situations. But how would you apply it to Spooky Action At A Distance, or Dark Force? The Universe is a strange, surreal place, and we don't yet understand a fraction of it. Which is why I keep an open mind as I look up at the stars...
  2. You've taken two sentences from two different contexts and put them together in order to point out an contradiction that isn't there Glen. One sentence aims to establish that the objects are not all on a horizontal trajectory, The other that if just one of the objects took off in a different direction alltogether, such as let's say 180º, it would be easier to see them as birds. I thought it was obvious, sorry if it wasn't.
  3. I think that even with a 'youtubed' video, one can make valid observations and at least exclude certain things that it cannot be. Cut some slack? The whole idea of testing the validity of a theory or a hypothesis is to find its weak spots, that's the proper scientific procedure. For those who think it's pointless to debate this footage, just move on. For those who think it's worth studying, all inputs are welcome.
  4. You haven't specified what type of optical artifact, or shown any example of a similar optical artifact. The explanation that the objects do not move but are simply some type of interference on the lens does not wash IMO. If you watch the 8 objects closely, you'll see that they come in at different angles and travel in different directions. This shouldn't happen if the camera was panning by some static dirt on the lens, they should all move in the same direction. There's a possibility that they are birds IMO, but does it really look like it? Why do they all (8) appear exactly at the Moon horizon, why do they all make the same movement inwards toward the Moon? If I saw just one object take a different trajectory, you would have something more bird-like.
  5. No problem meteoriot It's just that people get all emotional about the subject of UFOs and it can easily derail an interesting debate as the believers and non-believers clash. As you said, it's justified to pose the question, because strange lights and odd fly-bys have been spotted on the Moon before by qualified people. Which is why I would like to see wackyscot's picture!
  6. Whatever purported 'artifacts' there could be on the Moon (of which I have no knowledge whatsoever), I don't see why they could not be detected by European, Russian, Chinese, Indian or Japanese space probes. NASA therefore is not in a position to cover anything up. The cat would be out of the bag pretty quick IMO. I would like to focus on what the video is showing, I see no reason for now to tie it in with internet lore on UFOs or US government cover ups. I brought up the subject here on Stargazers to get feedback from experienced amateur and professional astronomers alike, in order to find out what this phenomenon is, or what it is not. That said, I still appreciate any input.
  7. Did you find that picture wackyscot? It would be interesting to see it, in the context of it all.
  8. I don't think people are jumping to conclusions. I think they've presented some sound theories. The conclusions are for later. Have you got any footage to share that gives a good example what you're talking about? I've been spending time looking at Moon clips. Full moons, waxing gibbous, waning gibbous, waxing crescents, waning crescents, some of them show refraction, others have dirt or droplets on the lens or other types of optic aberrations. The thing is, you can more or less tell. But the "Something With the Moon" video is different. It really looks like these objects are in proximity of the Moon, or at least at high altitude. I could be wrong, but that's what it looks like. Another thing is that the filmmaker has two other Moon videos posted, one three days older than the SWTM clip, the other four days older. All taken with the same camera under similar conditions, showing the Moon. There are however no strange optical or compression effects in these videos. They are mint. It doesn't prove anything, but it is an indication that we're not looking at a camera problem. I agree with you that - as we run out of plausible explanations - someone should take a closer look at the original footage, and perhaps even the camera. But I still think the odds are higher that this is some type of celestial event, and that we shouldn't write it off as an 'equipment problem' just yet simply because we can't explain it. If you have a link or some footage that illustrates well a similar type of phenomenon (that you know is optical or compression related) I'm willing to change my mind though.
  9. This is the professional investigation That said, the clip was filmed five days ago, so I guess the wheels have just been set in motion. Let's hope someone at ESA surfs this forum and decides to spend the weekend solving the mystery.
  10. Excuse me for being skeptic to all your theories, I just try to punch a hole in them to see if they stand the test If they're birds, why do they all (I've counted eight) appear right on on the Moon horizon, only to loop inwards toward the Moon? If I saw just one bird go in the other direction (come out of the moon), or make a different motion, it would be convincing. But I agree that as other theories fall apart, it grows in strength. Is there any footage of birds creating a similar phenomenon?
  11. If they're artifacts in the camera (that is, not dirt or droplets on the camera lens which would be out of focus), wouldn't similar phenomenon turn up in his other Moon clips? I believe tetenterre checked geostationaries, but found no match (apart from possibly debris from FengYun 1C, too small to register).
  12. Anyone else? I don't see that many alternatives to some type of space rock breaking up over the Moon in slow orbit, only to crash at the dark side, As to seismographs detecting it, has there been any reading since the Apollo Passive Seismic Experiment (which recorded seismic Moon activity until late-1977)?
  13. I just watched the video on a large screen, and it is my opinion that there is another object on the lower right side of the Moon at 0:47. You'll have to watch the smaller picture on the left to see it. Could someone confirm?
  14. Okay, I'll buy that. It's not meteors. As to space debris, there aren't that many options. NASA keeps track of space junk, so does ESA. So what are we talking about? These objects are simultaneous but quite spread out. If it's space debris close to the Moon, which it looks like, why are they so far apart? If I saw just one object go the other way, or be slightly off rather than right on the Moon horizon, it would be more convincing. But it's possible I guess.
  15. Yes, very interesting actually. The Moon is an odd lump of rock! I still think that if these objects were in orbit around the Moon, even briefly, at least some of the thousands of telescopes pointed at the Moon daily would have picked them out, no?
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.