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m_j_lyons

Advanced Members
  • Content Count

    379
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26 Excellent

4 Followers

About m_j_lyons

  • Rank
    Star Forming

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Interests
    astronomy, RC planes/quadcopters, flying in general, computer science, hiking, camping (RVing)
  • Location
    Roseville, CA, USA
  1. This is a great time to be observing Luna. Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I747 using Tapatalk 2
  2. Congratulations! The Owl is a nice object once you've found it...but it can be challenging to find the first time...especially in a smaller scope. There's a lot of planetary nebulae objects out there. Happy hunting. Sent from my Xoom using Tapatalk 2
  3. I know it helps me to use a computer log program... there are many available. Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I747 using Tapatalk 2
  4. Well said...M42 is not a high magnification object. It's one where less is more. Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I747 using Tapatalk 2
  5. From my recollection the Cone and Rosette are not standout targets to observe visually but are definitely visually observable. I remember the Cone being small and faint but obvious once on target. It's this also known as the Christmas Tree cluster? And the Rosette will be at best a faint nebulous region slightly more dense in certain areas (if I'm remembering correctly)...but unimpressive visually. The stars of the Rosette make identification easiest visually. Sent from my Xoom using Tapatalk 2
  6. Taking advantage of good skies is always a good thing. It won't be long before everyone is diving into Leo without having to stay up into the wee hours of the night. Sent from my Xoom using Tapatalk 2
  7. I had a question for the group - for those that enjoy hunting faint fuzzies (those small/really faint fuzzies that show up on charts but are so seldom seen) how much validation do you need before you declare them "observed" during your session? I know that many really faint galaxies will look like stars except under extreme magnification...so do you go on faith and say that if the charts say it should be a galaxy then it must be a galaxy and not a star? (looks like a duck, sounds like a duck, it must be a duck) I know most of the time I've been out "going deep" I rarely see anything where those tiny faint galaxies should be. I keep telling my wife...it may not be much to look at in the daytime but size DOES matter when the sun goes down. Happy (deep sky) hunting.
  8. Keep at it - you'll ID them eventually. With my 4.5" scope the M65/66 were a challenge unless in clear/dark conditions...and NGC 3628 was a prestine conditions only target with a 4.5" scope. With a 10" scope the triplet is much easier to eye-ball...but NGC 3628 remains a faint target for visual observation. Under prestine conditions you'll tease some detail out of it...but it's a dim ghost most of the time. Once you know where they are it's far easier to get back to them. Happy hunting.
  9. Another great night out! Would love to hear some more details of the evening. Sent from my Xoom using Tapatalk 2
  10. BTW, this is what I use and LOVE it - http://www.telescope.com/Orion-LaserMate-Deluxe-II-Telescope-Laser-Collimator/p/102109.uts?keyword=collimator Sent from my Xoom using Tapatalk 2
  11. I collimate every time I go out...with a laser collimator it only takes a minute or so. I do it because I have to transport the scope in the trunk and often carry it for multiple days there...so often it NEEDS it. If you can leave it setup I don't think you need to adjust it unless things just aren't looking right. I know my dob will NOT get close to focus of the collimation is out. Sent from my Xoom using Tapatalk 2
  12. Those are some lovely clusters. Sent from my Xoom using Tapatalk 2
  13. Agree about the two smaller NGC galaxies near M81/82...the are a great transition from they more obvious Messier targets and the mass of faint NGCs. Sent from my Xoom using Tapatalk 2
  14. Congratulations! That's a great haul of first observations. All are awesome to view...from stunning to faint. M81/82 are such a fun contrast that I love going back and forth between them. As your experience with observing increases keep coming back to some of your "old friends" to view them in a different light. Happy hunting! Sent from my Xoom using Tapatalk 2
  15. M97 was a real pleasure to observe...I agree that the filter made it easier, but under good conditions it will show up pretty well. Happy hunting. Sent from my Xoom using Tapatalk 2
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