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Gfamily

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  • Content Count

    98
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About Gfamily

  • Rank
    Nebula

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  • Location
    N Cheshire
  1. Gfamily

    Helo from North Wales

    Hi Andy - if you're near to Llandudno, the North Wales Astronomy Society meet nearby for observing sessions on 2nd Tuesday, and for a talk on the 4th Wednesday of the month. Although we're not local, we have friends who are, so we try to get to their talk meetings. Details on their website. http://www.northwalesastro.co.uk/About-Us/
  2. Gfamily

    Phone camera adapter

    Do let us know how you get on with it.
  3. Gfamily

    Phone camera adapter

    Yes, it makes a huge difference in my experience. Using a camera phone adapter depends to a critical degree on being able to get the camera exactly centred on the eyepiece; not only that, you need to get it at the right distance from the eyepiece. One like the one you have linked to, might be usable, but you'll need at least 4 hands to be able to get it lined up well and it's even trickier when you're doing it in the dark. At a very basic level, you probably need a pair of fine movement controls to help get the centering right - so that you can make the fine adjustments with the camera being secured. The Celestron NexYZ seems to be highly regarded as it has the fine controls mentioned, and also has an adjustment in the 3rd axis for the separation between the camera and eyepiece.
  4. Hint for levelling (if the built-in level is true), but you don't have a level observing site. Set the tripod up and physically turn it about until the bubble lines up with one off the legs. Them shorten that leg until the bubble is centred. If you're not sure whether the built-in level is true, find some flat ground, get the bubble centred (is likely to need adjusting 2 legs), then rotate the tripod 180 degrees about its axis. If the bubble stays centred, then it's true.
  5. Yes. though of course, Polaris goes round half as slowly as the clock hand would. ETA - and in the opposite direction.
  6. Think of it as a clock face, then the position of Polaris is where the hour hand would be at a time of 8:22. I use the SAM Console app (from SkyWatcher) on my phone , and this is how it shows.
  7. That's a blast from the past - hope you remembered to press the red button at the same time as the 'Play' button.
  8. It's what I'm planning to do when we travel to NZ later this week - I have it packed in a small toolbox that will be placed in the suitcase - near the top as it may well attract a bit of attention if the bags are X-rayed. However, be aware that your airline may require you to have spare batteries in your Cabin luggage; as far as I can tell, installed batteries are OK.
  9. Yup, as long as we really really believe, the dovetail elves will continue to pop round with a drill and a tap-set while you are asleep!
  10. Does the dovetail have a 1/4 thread that you can attach to the thread on the L bracket?
  11. I've heard a few people say on other sites that wrapping some of that multi-layer radiator reflecting material (that insulates as well as being silver) around a Maksutov scope is as effective as having an hour's cool down time in reducing the internal air currents that affect viewing. Personally I'm sceptical, but it's a suggestion - as Cosmic Geoff says, sometimes it's hard to tell whether the problems in the 12" of the telescope or the 80km of air above it. More useful information perhaps is that Smart phone adapters are designed to fit around the barrel of the eyepiece, so they are generally dependent on the size of that, rather than the type of scope . However, unless you are going for super wide angle (and super expensive) EPs, you shouldn't have a problem being able to use one. The Celestron NexYZ is generally very well reviewed. It's quite expensive (about £50), but allows controlled movement in 3 dimensions so you can attach it and adjust it to get the best image with only two hands. Others (in my experience) would only be easily operated by an octopus.
  12. Gfamily

    Small Network Storage

    I have one of these Zyxel's , an earlier NAS320 model, but very similar https://www.ebuyer.com/742498-zyxel-personal-cloud-storage-2-bay-nas-nas326-eu0101f Then a couple of these https://www.ebuyer.com/753878-seagate-barracuda-2tb-3-5-hard-drive-at-ebuyer-com-st2000dm006 Will give you 4Tb of data for about your £200 including discs. Ours is cable connected to our router and lives in a storeroom (well, technically it's the integral garage), so size isn't an issue. Admission: our first one failed after a couple of years, but Zyxel sent a replacement no question asked when we contacted them. I had been expected to pay something, but no!
  13. Gfamily

    A light read!

    You've identified why the book is often known as "Big G"
  14. Gfamily

    What do I get Christmas.

    A pair of Image Stabilised binoculars - Canon make optically very good ones, and the IS makes them far more effective for Astro use than you would expect. Here's Steve Tonkin's review of the 12x36 IS for S@N magazine http://www.skyatnightmagazine.com/review/binoculars/canon-12x36-iii-binoculars-0 Jessops seem to be selling these at about £530 so aren't too far outside your pricepoint. I have the 10x30s which they are selling for about £440. Mrs G has observed Neptune using these.
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