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Rick88

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    25
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10 Good

About Rick88

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    Nebula

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  • Location
    Surrey, UK
  1. Let us know if you remember; there are many types of weird-looking galaxies
  2. Oh, I would be interested to hear this idea Although as I'm sure it won't work as a physicist, the 2nd law of thermodynamics is the ultimate truth to me But it would be interesting to hear it out
  3. Aside from what SteveL said, I believe they also use the Andromeda galaxy as a "model" for our own galaxy. The Andromeda galaxy is our neighbouring galaxy, so very "close" to us and quite similar in structure. This makes it a very good model for reproducing our Milky Way.
  4. Obviously this is a never-ending issue. However, there are some questions that can put your theory "everything has always been here and always will" in major difficulty. Any system is not perfectly stable, included our own Solar System or the Earth-Moon system for us or any planet. So surely, any system must come from a previous parent system. (eg. Supernova -> Solar System) So what came before our current system? and before that? and before that? At some point, it all has to start with a Big Bang or some sort of catastrophic event that can also explain the redshift observed in the wavelength emitted by galaxies. Also if you say that the Universe has always been here, this almost surely includes the fact that the Universe's size is fixed. If not, surely there has to be a beginning. And obviously the WMAP data from supernovae clearly show the rate of expansion of the Universe is accelerating. I fear your theory comes solely from the grandness of the problem and the lack of accessible proofs in everyday life. But I'm sure that if you would start reading some papers around the web, you'd change your mind pretty quickly.
  5. Rick88

    Hello :)

    Hehe, I hope so! Thanks, guys
  6. Rick88

    Hello from Sweden

    Hello Jarmo, welcome to SGL.
  7. This is very interesting, although I think talking about a tenfold increase in the rate of star formation is quite hazardous. Surely they don't have enough data at all to reach such a conclusion, yet.
  8. Rick88

    Hello :)

    I hope so Thanks again to everyone
  9. Wow, they are great! Well done!
  10. Rick88

    Hello :)

    Hehe, I will be glad to answer them Thanks for the warm welcome to everyone
  11. Rick88

    Hello :)

    I don't know yet! Either research or working at NASA But I still have a year and a half of my undergraduate degree, so I have plenty of time to think about. My objective for now is to get a nice first class degree and then to manage to get in at a very good University for my PhD
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