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lankywolf

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Everything posted by lankywolf

  1. I have a pair of the revelation 15x70 bins. I don't have the Celestrons to compare them with, but for a beginner (like me) the revelation ones are excellent. FLO told me that they are made in the same factory to the same spec as the celestron version. The exterior varies slightly, but they said the optics were the same. you also get a plastic tripod adaptor with the Celestron set which you don't get with the revelation apparently. To be honest, I think the revelations are a bargain for £50.
  2. Thanks for the advice folks..... So I've narrowed it down to 2 tripods... The Horizon 8115 from FLO looks good, but I'm really tempted by the Camlink TPPRO32B at the bottom of this page Binoculars UK Ltd. Camlink TP PRO Tripods. It's a smidgeon cheaper than the Horizon and is significantly more expensive on most other websites (£140 on Amazon). It also opens up to 2m which is ideal for me.... Anyone have one of these or know if they're any good?
  3. I'm very harsh on myself when it comes to ticking the 'seen it' box. Because I only have bins at the moment I will only let it count if I think I won't get a better view of it through a scope. I know I've found M31 the Andromeda galaxy on numerous occasions, but I want to see it through a scope before I actually claim it. So basically I'm only claiming the odd cluster for the moment. NGC884 & NGC869 the double cluster between Cassiopeia and Perseus is my fave so far. Problem is, due to lack of space, I won't be getting a scope until I move house, so that could be 18 months away yet .
  4. I've just stumbled across this thread completely by accident. I'm in the Kingswinford / Wall Heath area and if the opportunity arose, I wouldn't mind coming along to one of your rendez vous, if only to have a good nose around your lovely scopes. I only have bins at the mo, but do drive so could feasibly give someone on the way a lift and get a bit of gear in the back of the motor. This is all assuming that know nothing astro idiots are allowed. I'll keep an eye on this here thread I think.
  5. Nice one, thanks. And thanks everybody for the advice.
  6. Although I'm not in the market for a scope just yet, I've still been looking around for future reference and the 200P is the one that has caught my eye the most so far. Sky at night magazine did a review of it which seems very favourable. Sky-Watcher Explorer-200P (EQ5) | Sky at Night Magazine It would be nice to here some first hand accounts from 'real' people though.
  7. I have tried slouching in a chair with my elbows on the arm rests which does help. Only problem is, I'm going to do most of my observing from my back garden which has the house at one end and big 6ft high fence panels round all of the other sides. This means the lower I am the less of the sky I can see. I could go out the front I suppose, but then I'd be lying on the pavement.
  8. That's a nice bit of improvisation there Mr. Big. I would prefer a tripod though as I'll probably do a bit of photography off it as well in the future. But still, I like your style!!!
  9. Yep... That's me.... As my username suggests, I'm a great big lanky lump....6' 4" to be precise. Now, I have this pair of 15x70 revelation bins which I'm using hand held at the moment and as I'm sure you can imagine the stars in the FOV are dancing around like fire flies. So, me thinks I need to get a suitable tripod. Now being such a lanky so and so, I want it to extend up to the heavens as far as possible whilst still maintaining a reasonable level of stability. I've noticed the Horizon 8115 on the FLO website which seems to be the most suitable I've seen so far. If I got that with the large binocular adapter I might be getting somewhere close to the level of my eyes. Is this setup any good? Or is there something else out there that might be better for me at around the same price? Any advice would be much appreciated. Cheers, Tony.
  10. Hi, I'm a fellow newbie and I asked a similar question to this a week or so ago. Lot's of people recommended Turn Left at Orion. Also recommended were Nightwatch and The Backyard Astronomers Guide, both by Terence Dickinson. As well as that, there were a couple of recomendations for books that contain useful info for beginners, but also info that you'll refer to for years to come. These were Norton's Star Atlas and the Illustrated guide to Astronomical Wonders: From novice to master observer. I looked into all of these on site's such as Amazon, WH Smith etc and found that they all had favourable reviews. I haven't bought any of these books yet but have tipped the missus a wink to get at least on of em' for my B'day coming up next month. I don't know if you have any kit yet, but I've just bough a pair of bins and went out and bought the Philips Stargazing with binoculars book from Smiths for £8, which I have found fairly informative so far. there is also a download on this site which lists 110 objects to view through your bins, which was very good for a freebie. For £5 your DK looks like a pretty good deal. There's bound to be some useful info in there and for a fiver you can't go too far wrong with that really I would say. All the best, Tony.
  11. Thanks for that little pointer, I can tell from just one night of use that a tripod would be a wise investment. I don't really have more than about £30-40 to spend on one at the moment. It needs to be as compact as possible when folded as the family and I go camping a lot in ther summer months and I want to take it along with me and hold astronomy sessions with the kids. Any recommendations? Or should I hold off for a while until I can scrape the money together for a pukka one?
  12. To be honest, I'm a complete novice at the moment, so I've got nothing else to compare them to, but they are definitely doing the job I bought them for. To me they are an absolute bargain at £50.
  13. I took delivery of my Revelation 15x70 bins today (only ordered them yesterday afternoon, great service from FLO) and have been out for an hour tonight for my first look at the skies through a visual aid since my old Tasco telescope almost 20 years ago. It's hard to put into words how good it feels to take the first step back into the hobby. I have so much more appreciation of what I'm looking at now as opposed to back then when I was a pre-pubescent child. The sky was a little bit hazy, I'm in a town location and I was using the bins hand held but I still managed to pick out a few fantastic sights. The pleiades looked superb, must have been able to see getting on for 100 stars. Had a look at Jupiter too but couldn't pick out any of it's satellites. The sky was particularly hazy in this area though so I'm hoping on another night I'll be able to see a couple at least. Also had a look at what I think was the nebula in Orion (looked like a couple of bright stars connected by some fuzz around them). Finally, I think I managed to find the Andromeda galaxy too. Although, again the sky was quite hazy over in the west it appeared like a faint 'smudge'. Can you get a nice crisp view of Andromeda through bins on a clearer night? The best thing of all is that just over a week ago, I didn't have a clue half of this stuff was even up there, nevermind being able to locate it in the sky. Stellarium is a godsend. Finally, I have to say I really enjoyed myself tonight and I can't wait to get out there again, (hopefully without the haze) and the bins are great. I've really caught the bug....
  14. I'm actually in Kingswinford, but didn't think many people would know where that was..... Have you been to any of the clubs round our neck of the woods? I've googled the Wolverhampton club and they seem to be based in Penn which is just up the road from me. I'm thinking of popping along once I've got through a bit more reading.
  15. Thank you for the warm welcome everyone.
  16. Hi all, I'm Tony from the Dudley / Wolverahmpton area..... I'm hoping to re ignite my intrest in those bright twinkly things in the sky.... I actually used to have a telescope when I was about 12 or 13... I badgered my parents for it for months until they finally caved in a bought me one of those old 'Tasco' ones from Argos.. Cheap and cheerful, but it did the job for the average 12 year old. I remember being open mouthed at the views of the moon and also finding those four little dots sitting next to Jupiter... I also managed to find Saturn once after I read something in the local paper about it being next to Jupiter in he night sky making it nice and easy for me to find....lol. So that's about the extent of my knowledge. I never really learnt the constellations properly. I can only pick out the really obvious ones such as the Plough, Cassiopeia and Orion. The old scope has long since gone unfortunately, donated to a family friend who completely wrecked it by all accounts. It's my own fault though. I eventually got sick of looking at the same old things and I was at the age when my attentions were easily swayed by girls and football..... I'm still intrested in those things (don't tell the wife), but am now able to appreciate that you have to put a a fair bit of time and effort into something like this to get something out of it. So I'm going to do it a bit of reading up before I take the plunge with a new scope. Anyway, I have already had a quick browse through the forum andalready come across some useful advice and stunning photo's and you all seem like a friendly bunch. So I'm looking forward to being a regular visitor in the coming months / years. Bye for now.
  17. Hi Folks...... Newbie here checking in. I'm hoping to rekindle my intrest in astronomy from when I was a young lad. So I think probably ought to do some reading up before I plunge into it. I sure a lot of this can be done on the internet nowadays, but I'm after an 'astonomy for idiots' type of book that's going to go through the basics that can be my companion for the next few months. But also one that contains info that I can refer to for years to come. After trawling through various websites I've come across 'The Star Guide' by Robin Kerrod. Would this come recommended by any of you guys or is there something more suitable out there. Many Thanks, Tony.
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