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StarryEyes

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About StarryEyes

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    Star Forming

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    Yorkshire, England, UK, Earth

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  1. Cool, thanks all for your responses. I have never seen a tumbling satelite before, I'll keep an eye out in future. Haven't had chance to check yet and see if I can find out what satelite it was.
  2. I found myself looking up to the stars just now, as my dog woke me up to go and have a little trip to the garden! As I was gazing up I noticed a shooting star (nothing too questionable about that), then I saw another. But then something else caught me attention. I saw a flash, similar to that of the lights of an aircraft, but it just seemed to be too high. I kept watching and could just make out a very faint object moving, which looked like a satellite. But what I then kept seeing doesn't make any sense to me. There were subsequent flashes coming from this object but they were not in a reg
  3. I haven't been on here for a while and re visited the other night after seeing a huge meteor. I decided to pop out with my camera tonight on the off chance that the Aurora was visible as low down as here, but unfortunately I haven't seen anything. Not being in a particularly dark area probably hasn't helped either. But I still decided to get some shots as it is lovely and clear. What I can't believe is I missed capturing a meteor which shot straight through my field of view. Inbetween two shots the security light came on and as I was waiting for it to go off I was looking at the live view
  4. That sounds like it was amazing to see AstroJon. In the same area of sky then. This one was moving fairly fast but was burning up for quite a while, as it caught my eye and then I saw it traveling a distance before it burned up.
  5. It looked to go between Sirius and Orion
  6. Cool, maybe I have seen one of them. Ah yes I think I saw an article saying one went into the Atlantic.
  7. So I'm sat watching TV and I noticed that it was clear outside so I was thinking I would get my camera out to take some wide field shots. Then all of a sudden (I wasn't looking out of the window but at the TV) a bright streak of light caught my eye through the window and I looked to see a huge shooting star streak through the sky. I couldn't believe how bright it was. I wish I'd been a bit sooner with my camera! Did anyone else see it? It was heading south just over 15 mins ago.
  8. Typical, I have clear skies but I think I have missed it. Does anyone know if it has already dropped below the horizon tonight?
  9. Is this just one exposure? I know you used a high ISO but there seems to be a lot of detail and colour. I'm still trying to get my head around this astro photography so sorry if this sounds like a silly question.
  10. That is cool, thanks for sharing it with us. Welcome to SGL. I've done a couple of time-lapse of the night sky from the images I shoot for star trail images, but I have always wondered how you get the stars to trail in your time-lapse? Do you have any tips?
  11. I always look forward to seeing your images Stewart. Yet again they are amazing
  12. Canon have announced the Astrophotography specific 60Da. "Designed specifically for astrophotography, the EOS 60Da is more sensitive to infrared light thanks to a modified low-pass filter that sits in front of the camera’s 18-megapixel CMOS sensor." Canon EOS 60Da - EOS Digital SLR Camera - Canon UK
  13. I didn't know that Venus and Jupiter were going to cross paths on Tuesday. Just hope it's clear. Want to get to a dark spot and get some imaging done.
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