Jump to content

Banner.jpg.39bf5bb2e6bf87794d3e2a4b88f26f1b.jpg

soggybongo

Members
  • Posts

    142
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Posts posted by soggybongo

  1. this was going to be my subject last night, got everything setup, spent an hour guiding to ensure the new cam is working as it should, went indoors to warm up a little and let the scope cool down. Went back outside 30 mins later and could not see a thing (blumming clouds). I'll be leaving Northern Ireland and the Mourne Mountains soon and heading for the mainland, the Mourns seem to be a cloud magnet every time i want to image.

    Nice pic by the way.

  2. Don't chuck your laser away - you can use it with a Barlow to fine tune your collimation, even if it's a poor one.

    Mine's a fast scope (F5) and looks like this down the collimator (the Cheshire looks identical to mine btw) :

    81418d1330880704-cheshire-collimation-cheshire.jpg

    I only did this a couple of days ago, and like you I wasn't sure if I'd got it right, so I posted the picture.

    your pic look similar to mine, the north/ south line of the crosshair(blurred one) is slightly offset to the left compaired to the vivid thin black line within the center spot, so it looks as if the thin line is spot on but the blurred line is off if you get me???

  3. Thats one question i meant to ask, when star testing do i just slightly de-focus or rack quite a way out. The reason for asking is i carried out a star tested last night and defocued from what looked like a pipoint (in focus) star to say a 2cm size star and got the pinched mirror pic on astro baby's website, but if i very slightly defocus i can see the rings around the star showing perfect collimation.

    i removed the primary thinking i had tightened the clips down to far but the are loose, when i say loose i can easily place a playing card between the mirror and clip. The clips are made of a very soft rubber so have a little give in them

  4. went and bought a cheshire collimator as pictured below as i did not trust my lasor collimator and was stupid enough to buy it in the first place, cleaned both primary and secondary mirrors using this tutorial

    then collimated them with astrobaby's tutorial. http://www.astro-baby.com/collimation/astro%20babys%20collimation%20guide.htm

    hows it look with your trained eye??????

    premium_cheshire_collimator.jpg

    collimation.jpg

  5. spc 900 probably wont give you any better results mate. use your nikon and use longer exposures and iso settings to experiment before tracking becomes an issue. Start with an exposure time of 30 seconds and an iso of 800 and adjust from there. The spc 900 cam is great if you have it modded for long exposures and want to guid with but you would be better off modding your dslr or buying a better dslr that has been modded. For instance an unmodded canon eos 350d body will cost you around £120 and will be far superior to a spc900. You would need the T-piece and adaptor about another £25.

    if you really want an spc900 modded webcam there is one here on the local auction site.

    http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/phillips-spc900nc-flash-upgraded-web-cam-long-exposure-mod-/160754099276?pt=UK_Photography_Telescopes&hash=item256db0e44c

    just my 2 pence worth

  6. fantastic pic and very pleasing colour. was this pic taken with your canon 350d (self modded) or your canon 5d?

    Also how hard did you find self modding your 350d, i'm itching to do mine but just have not got the dogs danglers to do it yet!

  7. going to start from scratch with both the secondary and primary mirrors by removing them and giving them a clean as i have had this scope for over a year and even then it was bought second hand so there is a fair ammount of crud on both mirrors, got nothing to loose really as my new scope (Altair Astro 115mm f805 EDT APO) will be with me soon.

    cheers for your help Jason D

  8. An interesting observation jason (and I defer to your experience).

    I found most of those videos quite informative, particularly one on checking collimation of lasers. I found my old laser one to be way out (and nigh on impossible to collimate). Gave up in disgust and bought one of the cute Cheshires from FLO.

    I'm still getting to grips with collimation but having more consistency (hence joy) with the cheshire.

    However, I have been considering buying a Hotech laser collimator to compliment the cheshire (e.g. a "double check" and easier to collimate in the dark).

    You think this might be a good idea?

    this is the cheshire i'm using

  9. Many thanks Jason for your input. I have just read the last post you placed in this thread - http://stargazerslounge.com/discussions-scopes-whole-setups/177056-laser-collimation-not-all-its-cracked-up.html

    I think my problem is with the secondary mirror not being correctly positioned under the focuser, it is round but i think it is very slighlty twisted as i cant see all three clips on the primary. i also have another problem - when i insert either the lasor or cheshire they both have a very slight wobble so dont fit perfect. When i tighten the thumb screws that hold them in place this tilts them slightly. I am going to wrap some plumbers ptfe tape around them to get a more snug fit and see if that makes a difference or is there some gadget that will fit in a 1.25" focuser to center them?

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.