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Showing content with the highest reputation since 04/06/12 in Image Comments

  1. Hopefully this is an improvement on last year's image, this should have been 4 hrs or so, but what with wind and cloud (it was supposed to be clear) it ended up at 75 mins of 60's, 60's due to wind and cloud.
    2 points
  2. What do you think? Good, bad, suggestions for improvement? This is my first image of M13 made up of about 4 hours of 2 minute exposures from the centre of light polluted Manchester. Skywatcher 150 AZEQ6-GT Mount Altair HyperCam 183C
    2 points
  3. Celestron Neximage 5 Solar System Imager, Celestron Nexstar 8i SCT.
    2 points
  4. This is beautiful too. Such a beautiful texture and I love the bright filament of yellow light near the top right.
    2 points
  5. I could see that image on the cover of a book. Fantastic composition
    2 points
  6. You will, takes some practice. My pictures are no way the best. I have more bad images than good. Trial and error to develop the skills needed for this hobby. Oh, and lots of patience!
    1 point
  7. Note: On the Siamese twins, there is an error. The designation should read, from left to right: NGC 4568 and NGC 4567.
    1 point
  8. The image of the galaxy M87 (center, right) was captured using 200 sub-frames at 30 second exposures each, with a camera gain of 220. Some light pollution is still present. The camera temperature was set at -19.5C. The telescopic instrument used, Explore Scientific ED 165 mm APO refractor, and 0.65x focal reducer & flattener. There are multiple other galaxies present.
    1 point
  9. The Great Globular Cluster in Hercules, also referred to as Messier 13. The Hercules Globular Cluster is estimated to be over 11 billion years old and 6,800 parsecs from our planet, with a linear diameter of 145 light years. If you glance over to the right of M13, lies the galaxy NGC 6207 which is located around 30 million light years from Earth. The image was captured using 31 sub-frames at 60 second exposures each, with a camera temperature set to - 32.2 Celsius. The amatuer-astronomical equipment used, Explorer Scientific ED165-FPL53 APO Triplet Refractor, Sky-Watcher EQ8-R Pro mount,
    1 point
  10. Glad you got to see it and image it at sufficient resolving power to show Saturn's rings and Jupiter's Belts. Top image! I only managed a brief glimpse on the 20th December and the 21st and 22nd were clouded out. Have a good Christmas and stay safe.
    1 point
  11. Great image, i got a shot of it on Saturday night struggling with the core haha. Tried blending a set of shorter rxpaoure but doesn't look great gunna keep working on it.
    1 point
  12. I dare say that it is Mount Olympus.....
    1 point
  13. Yes Reggie, I thought Syrtis Major was very prominent this year.The last time I managed to image this feature was back in 2014.You really notice the passing of time when you have astronomy for a hobby. Stay safe George
    1 point
  14. Must have been imaging at roughly the same time! Lots of detail Reggie your Big Mak does a great job! Best regards from George.
    1 point
  15. 99.3% moon Sky-Watcher Mercury 70/500 AZ3 2.5X barlowcanon 1100Diso 100 1/50s X 50frames processed and stacked with pipp+registax
    1 point
  16. Nice job, George. Love the composition. That is very artistic and dramatic
    1 point
  17. 1 point
  18. M33 Triangulum Galaxy Sky-Watcher Mercury 70/500 AZ3canon 1100Diso 3200exposure 1h 13min in total , 1.3sec per frame
    1 point
  19. The link is not to a 2" to 1.25" but to a T-2 mount camera body (no lens) / t ring / t mount - inserted into the telescope focuser as you may not be using the diagonal you may need a 2" long extension tube to use instead of it Before buying anything I would read up more on using a camera with your Evo 90mm
    1 point
  20. Two nights of Jupiter, sadly Io most of the time was in front or behind the planet, thus invisible.
    1 point
  21. Lovely shot. In terms of rarity, I liken it to photographing the Loch Ness Monster when a Unicorn gets in the way !!. I have a similar shot (Friday 10th July??) from Yorkshire but the comet was hidden by that right hand edge of the NLC.
    1 point
  22. Comet NEOWISE - Canon 600d DSLR- EF 90-300mm at approx f=300 mm - 10 sec at ISO1600. 3:00am BST getting light - Dawn approaching.
    1 point
  23. Weather has prevented me from seeing Comet NEOWISE but the clouds parted sufficient for me to witness this pretty conjunction of the Full Moon, Saturn and Jupiter with it's Galilean Moons spread out two per side. The image is a cropped composite of several RAW images at two separate focal lengths and exposure durations to accommodate the large dynamic range. Canon 600d DSLR. The captures were from a bedroom window. Mrs Hawksmoor wont let me cut the bamboo growing in our backyard. With no changes to our patio planting, we may either have Jack the Giant Slayer or a Giant Panda as an uninvited
    1 point
  24. Love this! What a dramatic image! Thanks for sharing.
    1 point
  25. Dumbell - barely visible, but there is definitely something there Also bright summer sky doesn't help. Sky-Watcher Mercury 70/500 AZ310mm eyepiecehuawey honor 8A phoneiso 3200exposure 8sec manually guided
    1 point
  26. Thank you very much for your kind comment. I did not set out to image the Moon. I was setting up to image Venus and noticed the Moon much lower down and just above the false horizon created by the kitchen extension roof. It was so beautiful I decided to capture a composite image. I never think you can do justice to the quality of light and colour when you capture the Moon in twilight. But I keep trying! George
    1 point
  27. Amazing image wayne, this is a hard object to get dark areas to show. as orion is getting low in the sky, good image.
    1 point
  28. Great image, you did really well hand held.
    1 point
  29. Nice conjunction took this quick handheld snap with my Canon 600D at about f=300mm. Can never really do these beautiful conjunctions justice. Just goes to show what a fabulous bit of kit the eyeball brain combo is!
    1 point
  30. You have picked up a few galaxies as well. That must be taken with a fair focal length to get that lovely detail on the nebula. Pure LRGB or NB ??
    1 point
  31. Beautiful photo. I think I may have to look into AP
    1 point
  32. Wow, that looks like something taken by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter
    1 point
  33. 1 point
  34. Some untold stories of today's Chromosphere.
    1 point
  35. 1 point
  36. There are some critics of the 294 camera but I love mine and your image just goes to show what can be done with it.
    1 point
  37. Lovely image! There's a wonderful intensity to the stars. Congratulations.
    1 point
  38. First pic for me to see as new arrival. Nice welcome. lovely capture.
    1 point
  39. Probably an Iridium satellite flare.
    1 point
  40. They are lovely pictures Tim. It epitomises amateur Astronomy to me.
    1 point
  41. Tim, your sketches are superb and an inspiration! Looking through those on show makes me want to spend more time studying some brighter DSO's. Truly excellent! Mike
    1 point
  42. Super stuff, aethereal and delicate with a touch of fantasy.
    1 point
  43. I think this one and the Triffid Nebula are my favourite shots from 5 years of astrophotography M31 is quite a tricky one to get right and it took a lot of effort to finally capture the data I needed to draw out all the detail. Not just that but the learning curve required to get the processing methods was a good 3 years work so don't be disappointed if you try and it just comes out all wrong keep on going and you will get it right remember, no pain no gain in this game.
    1 point
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