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Showing content with the highest reputation since 19/03/21 in Image Comments

  1. A Daystar Quark Chromosphere Hydrogen-Alpha filter with an internal telecentric Barlow at 0.5 Angstrom bandwidth was used. A Televue 2.5x Powermate used with a Lunt 80MT APO refractor and Altair Hypercam 174m monochrome camera, cooled.
    2 points
  2. The Sun’s surface in Calcium light (half disk) was captured using an Altair Hypercam 174m monochrome camera, fan cooled and Daystar Quark Calcium H-line filter with a built-in telecentric Barlow. The second image (right) of the Sun’s Chromosphere was captured using the same camera equipment above, but in addition a Daystar Quark Chromosphere Hydrogen-Alpha filter with an internal telecentric Barlow at 0.5 Angstrom bandwidth was used. A Televue 2.5x Powermate & SharpCap was used to magnify and stretch the image. The telescope used, a Lunt 80MT APO refractor. Solar processing
    2 points
  3. This is our closest star, “The Sun”. The image of our planet was added to show the scale of “Earth” in comparison to several solar prominences. The solar prominences were taken on April 12, 2021 at 12:54 PM ET, using a Lunt 80MT APO refractor, Daystar Quark Chromosphere H-Alpha filter and Televue 2.5x Powermate, with 200 sub-frames stacked. The camera used, an Altair Hypercam 174M mono CMOS camera.
    2 points
  4. The solar photography equipment used was a Lunt 80MT APO refractor, Televue 2.5x Powermate and Altair Hypercam 174M mono camera, cooled.
    1 point
  5. It is that time of year again, galaxy season! The Sombrero galaxy also designated Messier 104, located at the southern edge of the Virgo constellation and Corvus, a small constellation in the Southern Celestial Hemisphere. M104 lies at 28 million light years from Earth and boast 800 billion suns. The Sombrero galaxy is easily seen through small telescopes and has a bright magnitude of 8. The image of Messier 104 was captured using 46 sub-frames at 60 second exposure each, using a Baader - Moon & Sky glow filter.
    1 point
  6. Thanks for the suggestion! Pixinsight and Photoshop are definitely on my list! My skies is Bortle 5, in Malaysia.
    1 point
  7. Hi Tan, no unfortunately I never got into facebook, but I am on LinkedIn. Thank you for all the likes!! I'm looking forward to return the favor! Oh, btw, try investing in Pixinsight, and Adobe Photoshop (subscription). Astro Pixel Processor is ok too, but it looks like PixInsight is the best, IMO. Just keep practicing. What skies are you imaging in? My skies are Bortle 5 - 6.
    1 point
  8. You will, takes some practice. My pictures are no way the best. I have more bad images than good. Trial and error to develop the skills needed for this hobby. Oh, and lots of patience!
    1 point
  9. Note: On the Siamese twins, there is an error. The designation should read, from left to right: NGC 4568 and NGC 4567.
    1 point
  10. This is like looking deep into space. Love it!
    1 point
  11. The image of the galaxy M87 (center, right) was captured using 200 sub-frames at 30 second exposures each, with a camera gain of 220. Some light pollution is still present. The camera temperature was set at -19.5C. The telescopic instrument used, Explore Scientific ED 165 mm APO refractor, and 0.65x focal reducer & flattener. There are multiple other galaxies present.
    1 point
  12. @astroenthusiast you're welcome!
    1 point
  13. @astroenthusiast you're most welcome! Really hope I can get pics yours soon!
    1 point
  14. @Tan Zhi Qi Thanks again!!
    1 point
  15. @Tan Zhi Qi Thank you!!
    1 point
  16. The image of Messier 42 was captured using 10 sub-frames at 30 second exposures each, using a 102 mm APO refractor at F/7. The camera used in the image train, an ASI2600 CMOS OSC. Processing software used: Astro Pixel Processor to stack the sub-frames, PixInsight to stretch & process the image and Adobe photoshop to finalize process.
    1 point
  17. NGC 4565, also known as the Needle Galaxy. Taken with a ES 165 mm APO refractor and Starizona 0.65x focal reducer & flattener.
    1 point
  18. 30.7MP equates to 95 M ly since a parsec is 3.2 ly. IIRC.
    1 point
  19. Very nice Dean, that lunar image is very sharp!
    1 point
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