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  1. Blast from the past. 2 years ago, when I got the Samyang 135mm f2 lens, I couldn't wait for the winter to come so I can shoot Orion widefield. Well I did shoot it but I forgot about the data and 2 days ago when I decided to redo some of my 135mm work I stumbled upon this untouched data and I went to work Details and full resolution on my astrobin account https://www.astrobin.com/5i2906/?nc=user Emil
    48 points
  2. This season just ending has been an unmitigated disaster weather wise and I have just been through my saved images and I have managed just 11 images this season and two of those were widefield nearby images of the moon and the Milky Way leaving just 9 deep sky images and one of those is particularly rubbish! We all must have a masochistic streak!! My rig gets taken down next week and packed away until August - lets hope for a better season next year. Here is the fruits of my labour from the winter season just ending......
    42 points
  3. Hi all, managed to add another panel to my Flaming star image from January. App really makes integrating mosaics seamless, great piece of software. 2 Panel Mosaic 5 hrs of Ha/Oiii with an Stc Narrowband filter. Mixture of 300 and 180 second subs at gain 100 5 hrs of rgb mix of gain 100 and 0 and mix of 150/180 second subs I used SgPro for sequence, APP for integration and PI, APP and PS for processing. Shot with an Asi2600mc through a Takahashi Epsilon 160ed mounted on an AzEq6. Hope you like it. Richard.
    36 points
  4. Another from the easter week-end. This is the old 8" LX200 on its wedge again, EOS700D, 53 X 180s ISO800. Strangely my go to stacker APP made a hash of this for some reason that I dont understand, so I tried stacking in PI using the WBPP script and it did a great job. Post processing also in PI C&C welcome.
    34 points
  5. Im planning to give up on this hobby and will donate to anyone who is looking for astro stuff. so yes, its free. €0,00 it can be collected when you keep the social distancing in mind or it can be shipped Skywatcher eq8 pro (pending) Skywatcher esprit 120 Celestron edge hd 14 incl reducer Zwo 2600Mc Set of Televue 3.7 and 17 Ethos. Boxed. (I will post pictures later tonight) all Items are in mint condition and bought in 2020. If all taken at once i can throw in a basically unused 2” narrowband filterset *The Eq8 pr
    33 points
  6. NGC 4449 is a dwarf galaxy located in Canes Venatici, 20,000 light years across and c12.5 million light years from Earth. Its structure is similar to the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), the satellite galaxy to our Milky Way. Evidence for a very high rate of star formation is indicated by the presence of many young blue stars and pinkish star forming regions. It was the first dwarf galaxy to have an associated tidal stream identified which is the product of violent interactions with another satellite dwarf galaxy, NGC 4449B. The faint remnants of NGC4449B appear as a dim trail of stars and
    31 points
  7. This season, I really wanted to get back into stargazing. I’d hardly done any for some years. I had various excuses for the lack of observing. But this season, I was going to be back! Well, the weather was dire for the first month or so. But over the season, the sessions gradually racked up. And I was wondering whether to skip tonight's session - I was feeling cold and tired. But there was no such defeatist talk over in the Astro Lounge: “Tonight is the night”, declared mdstuart. “Transparent skies over the uk tonight and no moon”. Well that picked me up. And anyway, get a good sessi
    31 points
  8. This was another test image from last night that's come out better than I expected. Its just 114 one minute exposures taken with 250PDS and 1600MM. 2x binning.
    31 points
  9. I’ve been participating in online forums since the dark ages. Usenet during the 90’s and bulletin boards before that. In all that time I don’t think I have come across a forum as good as SGL. I don’t just mean Astronomy related either. Online forums full stop. Friendly, polite, welcoming, non judgemental or patronising, respectful with excellent advice from contributors with a wide range of expertise. I’ve not seen a moderator have to “step in”, which says it all. The technical side is excellent too. A sensible non garish colour scheme and great support for images and links.
    30 points
  10. Hi Folks! Resembling a hot chilli these superheated blue tendrils of ionised oxygen are remnants of a spectacular supernova that occurred some 11,000 years ago. Located in Vela some 800 LY distant, this small isolated section of this vast region silhouetted against a background rich in Ha seemed worthy of attention it’s own right - as after an exhaustive search, there don’t appear to be any stand alone studies online of this beautiful waveform. Photographed over three nights from my light polluted suburban backyard in Melbourne, Australia. Acquisition was made using Stell
    29 points
  11. Well it was clear from midnight above us in York last night and it was the first chance to have a proper look around with the 8inch dob. Went outside, copy of turn left in hand with all intent and purpose to find somethings for us as beginners to view. I never picked the book up again last night. Started at Orion Nebula and after viewing that just spent the next two hours just looking around in amazement at the night sky through the scope. with 26mm eyepiece in all night I just kept staring at the night sky. I know and slightly regret I didn’t focus my energy in finding objects to
    29 points
  12. Ever since I first saw NGC 3718 I've wanted to image it at some point so I decided to dedicate some precious clear skies to it recently. This was taken over three nights where the moon was rising well past midnight so it's effect varied as the early hours came round. Using the StellaLyra 6" RC and ASI533, it was taken at native focal length, so a very pedestrian F9 Original image was ~0.57"PP, so this was IntegerResampled in PixInsight (2x) before starting processing. In total, 333 x 120s (~11 hours) of subs were integrated. Captured with Voyager, stacked & calibrated in
    27 points
  13. The Integrated Flux Nebula (IFN) in this particular area of Ursa Major not far from M81 and M82 is rarely imaged. NGC2976 up in the left corner of this image is that small galaxy often caught together with M81 and M82 so those more iconic galaxies are lurking just a bit above this image. With the RASA I found the IFN to be quite colourful with both grayish and reddish reflecting dust. It is generally throught that these clouds are on the outer edges of our galaxy and, unlike "ordinary" reflection nebulae, are reflecting the light of the whole galaxy, and are thereby very faint and usually not
    27 points
  14. I'm calling collecting data enough for this season. 5 years ago I put the DSLR for the first time at the back of a telescope and I took my first shots. Some of them were aimed at M81 and M82. For the next 5 years I collected more data with various scopes, cameras, carried by many mounts. The newest one is still fresh, I finished collecting RGB and Ha data for it this morning so more processing versions will come. I used for it also some Lum data I shot in 2019 with the large 200mm newton from home (for highlights only), Lum data I collected last year during the emergency state w
    25 points
  15. Hi everyone, My first post and one of my first DSO images - M101. I am really happy with this but realise that I have a long way to go to. I have no background astonomy experience beyond finding Polaris and recognising a couple of constellations. Any comments/advice would be welcome on how I can improve within the scope of my equipment . I seem to have settled on Siril for stacking, background extraction and stretching Mount - Fornax Lightrack II with Manfrotto 410 head acting as a wedge (about to be replaced with the Fornax wedge) Camera - Sony A7riii (42MB, full frame a
    25 points
  16. Landscape astrophotography is something I’m interested in getting into more. There were some faint Aurora recently so I decided to give it a go. This is a foreground stack of 3x180sec on foreground and 1x30sec for sky, Nikon D600 and Samyang 14mm. A half critical eye will show my blending needs work and of course the sky is quite noisy since it’s only one frame at fairly high ISO. Hopefully it’s still semi pleasing to the eye
    25 points
  17. Greetings Folks I have been eagerly waiting the rise of the Milky Way. I cannot handle shooting galaxies in bortle 7 any longer! That being said he is an edit of some older SHO data collected early fall of 2020 right outside of Cincinnati, Ohio (B7) The Bubble Nebula - This is, and will likely remain the some of the best data I'll collect for the foreseeable future. My seeing conditions were spectacular during the three nights of capture and the data acquisition process was flawless allowing me to get the best out of three full nights. My goal for this image was to capture the internal
    23 points
  18. Finally the wind died down enough to try the 250PDS last night. It now has an aperture mask installed just above the mirror to help improve flare around stars caused by mirror clips. Many thanks to @tooth_dr for all his amazing help on that. 96x 1min Lum 59x 1min Red 57x 1min Green 52x 1min Blue 4.4 hours. Unfortunately about 2 hours of data lost to a slight breeze. 1600mm pro Example star before aperture mask shows significant improvements.
    23 points
  19. Back in October I found this faint object by surfing in Taurus on Aladin Sky Atlas and did not recognize it until I started processing and suddenly realized I was looking at the Baby Eagle. Seeing was not the best and processing was quite challenging. I have now had the EZ star reduction script in PI to have a go at it. It really helped to suppress the star field to a level that lets the faint nebulosity shine. Data gathered with a RASA 8 and ASI2600MC, 73 x 4 min at gain 100. I like they way this combo can bring out colour and light in objects that often look rather dull.
    23 points
  20. Just arrived and amazingly well packed... triple boxed, with spacers Nestled inside was a gorgeous Takahashi FC76-DCU I can’t believe how light it is compared to the StellaMira 80mm, and the finder is so clear to look through
    23 points
  21. Galaxy season is back and I've just had my first "all nighter" of the year! My first target of Friday night was M81 - Bode's Galaxy in Ursa Major. 50 x 240s, with darks, flats and dark flats. Total exposure time 3 hours 20 mins. ASI294Mc Pro and Optolong L-Pro filter. The second half of Friday night was spent on the RGB part of M82 - The Cigar Galaxy also in Ursa Major. This beautiful Starburst galaxy was imaged over 2 nights in H-alpha and RGB. 30 x 300s H-Alpha, ASI294MM Pro 50 x 240s ASI294MC Pro and Optolong L-Pro filter. Total exposure time 5 hours 50
    23 points
  22. As a dummy run for my attempt to image the 3C 273 jet I thought I would have a try for the somewhat easier plasma jet emanating from the supermassive black hole at the centre of M87. Here is 78 minutes of Lum data, captured with the Esprit 150/ASI 178 rig. I am 99% certain it is present on the stacked image, by comparing the orientation of the brighter pixels at about 11 o'clock with library images. I was a little uncertain as some of the brighter stars appear to have an artefact in about the same place. Interestingly it actually shows a tiny bit of structural data on a single 3 min sub
    22 points
  23. Hi all, what a great few nights over the Easter weekend. 3 clear nights in 4 days allowed me to complete what would sometimes take weeks or months. Each panel consists of about 4 hours in 150 second subs. Shot with an Asi2600mc through a Tak Epsilon 160ed, mounted on an AzEq6. Captured with sequence generator pro Processed in APP, PI and PS. Hope you like it, Richard. Ps, there's actually a flaw in the mosaic. Top of the class to anyone who spots it.
    22 points
  24. I have been moaning on and on about the coma in the old LX200 GPS and how it is not fixed by the meade 4000 F 6.3 Reducer. Then I read post on here 9sorry cant find it now) which suggested that modern refractor FF / FR 's may work better than the specific Meade FF / FR . So I stuck the SW 80 ED 0.85 FF / FR on the Big Blue Trash Can last night and thought "in for a penny...." So bolted the ASI2600mc on and sent it off to find the Needle. Now its giving me 1700mm FL (although plate solve says 1900), and with the 2600 mc that comes to a image scale of around 0.4". So I binned it 2 X 2. I got thi
    22 points
  25. Hazy sky last night so I setup the 250pds ready for when we eventually get a clear night. Amazingly skies must have cleared at some point as it managed 88 mins of data. SkyWatcher 250-PDS with 1600MM Pro - in just 1 and a half hours from Bortle 5. https://www.astrobin.com/i49p9i/0/
    22 points
  26. I found this one tricky in both capture and processing and didn't get as much data as I hoped but hopefully its come out ok. Hope I've not gone over board with noise reduction. 250-PDS, ZWO 1600MM - 4.7 hours. https://www.astrobin.com/0ierjp/?nc=user
    21 points
  27. Some new targets for me tonight, plus some old faves, in Coma Berenices and Canes Venatici. The sky promised to be very transparent, although some clouds came through later to spoil the party. Temperature was just below freezing, and the wind chill made it feel like -5 deg C. Started out with the M52 open cluster and the Nova. Cold and breezy. Local light pollution M51 (Whirlpool) - Hints of structure with averted vision. M101 - Very faint, needed averted vision and some dob-wobbling to find it. NGC 4490 (Cocoon galaxy) - Clear and shape obvious but smaller companion not visible NG
    21 points
  28. Nothing special here but a brilliant night with my Mrs Forecast was excellent, so we headed to our dark sky site Journey time around 1.30 hr Temperature on arrival was 5 degrees this is around 19.00. Full set up of both dobs and colimate then sit back and have a brew. Temperature is now dropping so time to put the freezer clothing on Orion was now visible which was around 20.30. Sun wasn't set but m42 looked great waiting now for darkness. The object of the night was to show my wife around the nightsky, first time here with her dob. Popped in the apm 20mm and 100* an
    21 points
  29. Forecasts were looking good for 3 clear nights in a row. However, I have my first Covid jab tomorrow, so thought I had better make the most of the first night, and thought I'd try for a longer session than normal. After a week of quick sessions with the new ST80, it was nice to go back to the 8" dob. All the posts about seeing Sirius' pup inspired me to have a shot. I moved a table to the northern side of the garden and set the dob up on top, so that I could get a view of Sirius. Shouldn't have bothered though - the seeing was pretty bad and disco-ball Sirius was jumping all around the f
    21 points
  30. Taken on 6th March, 72 minutes with the Samyang 135mm f2 and Canon 6D (cropped).
    21 points
  31. A couple of nights imaging the ISS this week. The images are posted in the challenges, but i thought if members had any questions or comments i would repost here and add the GIF as well.
    21 points
  32. I combined data from 4 different years to give a total of 18 1/4 hours done with different equipment. Including Atik383L and Atik460EX William Optics ZS71, Skywatcher 130PDS, Skywatcher Esprit100 2014 4h 20m 2015 3h 40m 2019 2h 15m 2021 8h Total imaging time per filter Ha 11h 10m Oiii 4h 25m Sii 2h 40m Grand total 18 1/4 hours. Cropped for detail on the "Animal Parade" I can see left to right: Peacock(s), Dogs, Donkey, Panther, Spaniel and a possible peacock lying down (Think I can even see a Sheep in there??) Carole
    21 points
  33. M108 is a spiral galaxy 46 million light years distant in Ursa Major. It is inclined at 75 degrees from the viewers perspective, so the spiral structure is hidden from view. Visually it appears as a relatively small object (11.1’ x 4.6’) with an apparent magnitude of 10.7. Its core is estimated to contain a supermassive black hole with an estimated mass of 24 million solar masses. I was pleased to capture quite a bit of detail on the galaxy including the Ha emission areas. The background also contains many small, more distant, galaxies. The LRGB image below was taken with my Esprit
    21 points
  34. For the first time in 20 years, I finally have an observatory again, a pulsar 2.2 dome. This is also the first time I have used a dome, previously having had a roll of roof shed. I moved last December to a house with a bigger garden and top of my list was an observatory as our previous residence's garden was so small, an observatory would have swamped the place. So hopefully, I can now be more productive and here is an effort from my new abode. Total integration time was around 9 hours and taken though a SW Esprit 150. Adrian
    20 points
  35. Ngc 2175 is a star cluster, associated with an emission nebula in the constellation Orion. The nebula goes by the popular name Monkey Head nebula. There is some debate whether the nebula has its own ngc number (ngc 2174) or whether this number is a double in the catalogue, so that the star cluster actually has two ngc numbers. The nebula and cluster are about 6 400 lightyears distant. The nebula has an angular width of about 40 arc minutes. This means that it's a big monkey, with a skull that is about 75 light years across. The data for this image was collected in February of this ye
    20 points
  36. I started out this evening with a 100mm refractor intending to try and split Sirius, observe some other binary stars and to have another look at the nova in Cassiopeia. After getting engrossed in an old film with my other half after supper, I found that Sirius had got rather low to be worth observing so I had a quick look at Zeta Cancri (Tegmine) and then Nova v1405 Cas (which seems slightly dimmer but still around magnitude 8 ) and then had a look at the galaxies Messier 81 and 82. These seemed quite bright and well defined so I decided to put the 12 inch dob out, have a cuppa, and then
    20 points
  37. With clear skies since early night I managed to bag myself quite a few of my nebula targets that I have been trying to visualise for a while. A good solid 3 hrs of observing. My first target was the Rosette nebula with my OIII filter. I cannot describe my excitement when I saw it. The size of it! It did not fit in my 32mm EP (50 FOV); clear nebulosity looking like a donut with darker middle. I was mesmerised and I spent a good 20min observing and taking everything in. My next one was NGC2359. Very faint nebulosity with the filter on, i think coming from the Rosette it felt a bit disappointing.
    20 points
  38. This is 20 x 60s + 20 x 120s + 15 x 180s from ASI294MC - StellaLyra 6" RC combination - unguided because I couldn't get the guiding to work. Pre-processed in APP and post-processed in PI and Affinity. As always C&C welcome. Thanks for looking. Adrian
    20 points
  39. A nice galaxy and a Planetary in one widefield. This was around 3 hours with the Evostar 80 ED and the ASI2600mc Nice as a wide field ; But holds OK a quite a tight crop too; C&C Welcome as always.
    20 points
  40. It's been months since I've been able to visit my local dark site. Thanks to the reduction in lockdown restrictions, an opportunity came up last night to go which I jumped at! Arriving onsite around 8pm with the sky still fairly bright, I was able to take my time setting up, carefully collimating the 10" dob and aligning the finders. I started off observing the Nova V1405 in Cassiopeia. I've viewed the Nova many times over the past 10 days so it felt like familiar ground. M52 really popped under the darker skies. I popped the 10mm Delos in for a closer look. This really brought it to life with
    20 points
  41. If you can, get out and observe the Moon I've just had a short session before supper with my 12 inch dobsonian and the seeing conditions seem to be outstanding currently. I've been observing the concentric crater Hesiodus A again, which I reported on last night: https://stargazerslounge.com/topic/374414-more-unforecast-clear-skies/ The image was so sharp that I just kept piling on the magnification as my jaw dropped. Eventually I was using the 2mm (!!!) setting of the Nagler zoom for 795x and the crater looked stunning. Gassendi, it's rilles plus the central peaks are
    20 points
  42. Last night (22 March) the seeing was superb despite the light mist. I spent an hour gazing at the Moon with my Skymax 180 using about 300x magnification and still enjoying steady views. I thought I even got a glimpse of parts of the elusive rille running through Vallis Alpes! I was so impressed that I took the trouble to attach my DSLR and shoot two 2minute videos (about 3000 frames each) at prime focus. After the usual processing this is what I got. I think the Skymax did well for a 7 inch scope Tycho and Clavius near the terminator: Vallis Alpes was on the edge
    20 points
  43. I found choosing a first telescope – particularly during lockdown when you can't see or touch anything – a real challenge, but I think I found a good one in the end ... so I wanted to offer my thoughts on the ST80 with AZ3 mount in case it's helpful for someone else considering this telescope. I was looking for: -a very portable telescope to take to the park, as my garden has restricted viewing -a wide field of view (FOV), to help me find objects while I'm learning the sky -visual only – no photography necessary right now -cheap, so I could see if I actually enjoyed looking at the
    20 points
  44. A panoramic image from last night covering nearly 180 degrees of the outer Milky Way. 6D and Samyang 14mm f2.8, stitched together in Microsoft ICE. Each pane is a stack of five 20 second exposures. Also made an annotated version showing the approximate field of view in Stellarium and the constellation sectors on a Milky Way map.
    19 points
  45. Right under the back paw of the Great Bear, is this collection of galaxies and galaxy clusters. The largest object in this image is galaxy ngc 3180 or ngc 3184, it seems to have two entries in the new general catalogue. It is situated at a distance of 40 Mly according to Wikipedia, but only about 26 Mly according to its redshift (0.00197). The galaxy is of type SAc, a spiral galaxy with active star forming regions, which I tried to enhance by collecting Ha as well as RGB. The angular size of this galaxy is only about 7 arc minutes, giving it a diameter of about 55 000 light years, half th
    19 points
  46. This is my second galaxy shot of the season. I thought of redoing some targets that I tried before when I was only starting my AP journey and M81-M82 are a pair that were always on my mind. Living in Bushey, UK, on the outskirts of London, under bortle 7 skies and with the telescopes in the shade of a parasol that's protecting them from the direct beam of a streetlight doesn't really allow me to go deep enough to capture any IFN but I really don't mind. I'm perfectly happy that I can still get results like this. I have to integrate quite a lot though, 22 hours on this one. I dri
    19 points
  47. So, whenever I'm imaging I start to worry that maybe I've messed up something in the setup. The longer I'm on a target for the worse I worry that I might end up with a whole nights worth of rubbish. I seem to have got into a habit of tacking a 'easy' target on at the end of the session so I should always have something to take away. Last week I grabbed 13 minutes of M13 at the end of the night. I thought it came out quite well for a consolation prize.
    19 points
  48. It was a rare occasion when one of the weather forecasts was right last night. I managed to get about 5 hours on M106, before the cloud rolled in. 2 hours luminance and 1 each of RGB. Given my location and the first quarter moon I am not too displeased with this one. As always, it could do with a little more data.... Taken with a Stella Lyra RC8 reduced down to F6 and an ASI1600MM. Constructive criticism and comment welcome as ever.
    19 points
  49. AKA The herring and the Hockey-stick!! A disappointing night last night with high haze really knocking things back - I think thats why I've got so little of the "tidal tail" of the crowbar. But never mind, It was a clear enough sky to get an image. This is around 4 hrs of 180s subs with the Evostar 80ED and the ASI2600mc C&C Appreciated.
    19 points
  50. I want to share the nice observing session I had last night. I was out from 8pm to 10pm. After the showers the sky cleared and the transparency became almost unreal. I went out after dinner and was very excited to be able to spot the Beehive and the Double cluster with naked eyes from my SQM 20 location. It was still windy so not a night for high mags. I decided to focus on open clusters and DSO and mounted my 6 Inch Newt (The £100 C6N which was a real bargain from @FLO while it was available). I am using EQ5 in manual mode with a tiny 6x30 finder so a big part of the enjoyment is the '
    19 points
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