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Showing content with the highest reputation since 23/03/21 in Images

  1. From the album: MOON

    Moon Surface 16 April 2021 21:32 Celestron NexStar 6SE ZWO ASI 462mc
    4 points
  2. From the album: Solar

    The name is because of what's been going on in my mind. Get a camera again? Or process data others have captured, such as this image from SDO's AIA171 Angstrom data (which can't be captured from the Earth's surface anyway - the extreme ultraviolet light doesn't make it through our atmosphere). Or a bit of both? I think it's definitely no camera. It's ace to capture your own stuff, but I enjoy relaxed visual and get a bit fed up fighting clouds when imaging, and stuff like that! Maybe if I had an obsy... Oh gosh, there I go again. Stuck in a loop! --- Sun, AIA
    4 points
  3. From the album: Roy Foreman - Lunar Imaging

    Plato 23rd March 2021 16" F/4.5 Reflector Baader FFC set to 3x amplification ZWO ASI 183 MM UV/IR Cut Filter 15% of 900 frames at 19 fps Selective Enlargement Processed in Auto Stakkert and Photoshop
    3 points
  4. From the album: Deep Sky III

    M108 is a spiral galaxy 46 million light years distant in Ursa Major. It is inclined at 75 degrees from the viewers perspective, so the spiral structure is hidden from view. Visually it appears as a relatively small object (11.1’ x 4.6’) with an apparent magnitude of 10.7. Its core is estimated to contain a supermassive black hole with an estimated mass of 24 million solar masses. I was pleased to capture quite a bit of detail on the galaxy including the Ha emission areas. The background also contains many small, more distant, galaxies. The LRGB image below was taken with my Esprit 150 and r
    3 points
  5. From the album: Solar System

    Shooting date: 10/16/2020; Shooting time 23:00 - 23:55; UT + 3h; Location: village #Dinskaya, #Krasnodar Territory; Equipment: Telescope Sky-Watcher 150 / 750PDS; Mount: Sky-Watcher Heq5 Pro SynScan; LB 3x #Televue Powermate; #ZWO ASI 120MC camera; Visible diameter 22.04 sec. arcs; Gloss -2.37; Azimuth 134.31 °; Height 42 °; The illumination of the planet by the Sun is 97.7%; Distance from Earth to Mars 63.5 million km; km; Roller 120 sec Crop video frames 8 bit, 380x380, 30% of 12,615, (69) FPS; Software: FireCapture; gain 36 (36%), exposure 7,000ms, Brightness (offset) = 9, Histogram = 60%;
    2 points
  6. From the album: Roy Foreman

    M51 Galaxy in Canes Venatici 12th April 2021 16" F/4.5 Reflector ZWO 294 MC Pro OSC 42 x 30 sec at gain 360 UV-IR Cut Filter Sensor Temperature -20C Processed in Deep Sky Stacker and Photoshop SQM 20.80
    2 points
  7. From the album: Roy Foreman

    M109 Galaxy in Ursa Major 12th April 2021 16" F/4.5 Reflector ZWO 294 MC Pro OSC 50 x 30 sec at gain 360 UV-IR Cut Filter Sensor Temperature -20C Processed in Deep Sky Stacker and Photoshop SQM 20.80
    2 points
  8. From the album: Roy Foreman

    M82 Galaxy in Ursa Major 2nd April 2021 16" F/4.5 Reflector ZWO 6200 MC Pro Full Frame OSC Selective Enlargement From Full Frame Image 38 x 30 sec at gain 360 20 x 45 sec at gain 360 UV-IR Cut Filter Sensor Temperature -20C Processed in Deep Sky Stacker and Photoshop SQM 20.44
    2 points
  9. From the album: Deep Sky Imaging

    This is NGC3603 and NGC3576 (AKA The "Statue of Liberty" nebula), a massive H-Alpha region containing a very compact open cluster, located in the constellation "Carina" about 20,000LY away. I took this photo on multiple nights, between 19th February and 15th March 2021. Imaged using my cooled and full spectrum modded Canon 40D DSLR attached to a Bosma 80mm f6.25 refractor on a CGEM equatorial mount. Total exposure time was 22 Hours and 1 minute using 7nm HII, OIII and SII Narrowband filters and stars are from natural color (UV/IR Cut filter) subs... imaged from a semi rural sky.

    © Mariusz Goralski

    2 points
  10. From the album: DSLR imaging

    Taken at Burrough Hill, Leicestershire, June 2013. This is a stack of 30 sub exposures, some 2 mins, some 3 mins. Stacked in Deep Sky Stacker. Canon 550D, Meade DS2102 refractor, Skywatcher EQ3 Pro Synscan.
    2 points
  11. From the album: Moon

    Moon panorama Date: 02/21/2021 Time: 20:12 +03.00 Height: 64 degrees In the constellation Taurus Lit: 69% Telescope: Sky-Watcher 150 / 750PDS Camera: ZWO ASI462MC Mount: Sky-Watcher Heq5 ProSynScan Panorama from 4 fragments Videos for 120 seconds Resolution: 1936x1096 Exposure time: 2ms Gain: 0 73FPS Added 250 frames from 8855 Software: Shooting in FireCapture Build: Autostackert 3.1.4 Wavelets and deconvolution: AstroSurface Panorama: Microsoft ICE Post-processing: Photoshop
    1 point
  12. From the album: Deep Sky Objects

    The Carina Nebula is a large complex area of bright and dark nebulosity in the constellation Carina. It is located in the Carina–Sagittarius Arm, about 8,500 light-years from Earth. Pro Dataset @telescope.live Telescope: ASA 500N Focal Length: 1900 mm Mount: ASA DDM85 Camera: FLI PL 16803 H-Alpha: 3x600s OIII: 3x600s Bicolour Processing: Pixinsight
    1 point
  13. From the album: MOON

    Moon Surface 16 April 2021 21:32 Celestron NexStar 6SE ZWO ASI 462mc
    1 point
  14. From the album: Roy Foreman

    NGC 2903 Galaxy in Leo 11th and 12th April 2021 16" F/4.5 Reflector ZWO 294 MC Pro OSC 60 x 30 sec at gain 360 UV-IR cut Filter 60 x 30 sec at gain 360 IDAS LPR Filter Sensor Temperature -20C Processed in Deep Sky Stacker and Photoshop SQM 20.80
    1 point
  15. From the album: Deep Sky

    1h 42m 102x 60s at iso 1600. Evostar 80ED, Canon EOS 500D, on AVX unguided. NGC 2903 is an isolated barred spiral galaxy in the equatorial constellation of Leo, positioned about 1.5° due south of Lambda Leonis. It was discovered by German-born astronomer William Herschel, who cataloged it on November 16, 1784. Distance to Earth: 30.66 million light yearsDistance: 30.4 Mly (9.33 Mpc)Size: 100,000 ly (diameter)Apparent size (V): 11′.48 × 5′.25Constellation: LeoApparent magnitude (V): 9
    1 point
  16. From the album: Solar

    I was digging through my old solar captures and I came across this capture taken in 2016 with a Quark that was a replacement for another Quark. The detail around the spot is fantastic, better than I could expect, but there is a lot of smearing that runs through the centre and for me it makes the device unusable for imaging, unfortunately. For me this image captures perfectly why I personally would be tempted to, but wouldn't, buy another Quark. I could buy a Quark from an excellent company like First Light Optics and return it if unhappy. But what if I keep it and it later develops a fault and
    1 point
  17. From the album: 2021

    1 point
  18. From the album: Roy Foreman - Lunar Imaging

    Clavius 23rd March 2021 16" F/4.5 Reflector Baader FFC set to 3x amplification ZWO ASI 183 MM UV/IR Cut Filter 15% of 900 frames at 19 fps Processed in Auto Stakkert and Photoshop
    1 point
  19. From the album: Solar System Objects

    This image is a compilation of my captured images of Mars during this years (2020) opposition season of Mars. All of the images were taken using a 8" SCT at 6764mm focal length (f33.3) with an Celestron Skyris 618C CCD. All of the images were taken with the same telescope at the same focal length so shows the size of the martian disc as it was closer, at opposition and further from Earth.

    © Mariusz Goralski

    1 point
  20. From the album: Deep Sky III

    Discovered by William Herschel in 1790, NGC 1491 is a bright emission nebula in Perseus about 12,000 light years distant and about 21 light years wide. Despite its large size, its distance from Earth means that it appears visually small. The HII region displays a great deal of structure. The 11th magnitude white/blue type O5 star BD+50 866, located near to the centre of the image below, illuminates the nearby hydrogen gas with high intensity ultra violet radiation, ionising the gas. Material ejected by the star has also created curtain fold and half bubble effects in the surrounding HII r
    1 point
  21. From the album: Festoon's Samyang 135mm Album

    M42 with 2hrs 17 mins of exposure over 2 nights (10/2/21 and 30/01/21) with 10 sec subs. Samyang 135mm f/2 with ASI224MC Cool and AZ-GTi. Stacked in DSS and processed in startools
    1 point
  22. From the album: Deep Sky Imaging

    The Witch Head Nebula, aka IC2118 & NGC1909 in the constellation Orion, near the star Rigel. This object is very large in the sky, being 3°×1°, so I had to use my smallest telescope to deliver the wide angle and low power needed to image all of the "Witches" profile. This is a very difficult object to image using a DSLR, and a dark sky is needed to capture it in it's full glory. I thought that I'd give it a go with my DSLR, and see what I end up with... I'm happy that the end result in my image shows the shape of the "Witch Head" but I think that the overall image will not be win

    © Mariusz Goralski

    1 point
  23. From the album: Lunar

    Arzachel, Alphonsus and Ptolemaeus It feels like I have been back to basics this week with imaging, exploring sharpening options. I think I will process a few more lunar shots to help get a new sharpening process going. This was sharpened using Astra Image. --- 01/01/2016 Celestron Edge 8, ZWO ASI174
    1 point
  24. From the album: Solar

    23rd January, 2016 Equinox 120, Daystar Quark, Grasshopper 3 ICX687
    1 point
  25. From the album: Imaging Challenge #15 - The Milky Way - Now Closed

    A 25 second exposure from a time-lapse taken over the cloud filled Caldera de Taburiente in La Palma in the Canary Islands. Mars is the red object to the left of the Milky Way. Saturn is in there too but is lost amongst the milky way. The bright lights hidden under the clouds are from the towns of Los Llanos and Tazacorte only about 7-8 miles away as the crow flies but about 90 minutes away by car! 25 sec at f/1.8, 14mm Sigma lens, ISO 3200, Canon 6D. The scene was illuminated by a crescent moon beyond the right of the image.

    © James Mackay

    1 point
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