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Showing content with the highest reputation since 16/06/20 in Image Comments

  1. The Western Veil Nebula, NGC 6960 was captured on May 31, 2021, at 4:44 am EST, with a total exposure time of 55 minutes. The amateur telescope used was an ES ED 165mm APO Triplet Air spaced refractor at F/7. The dedicated astronomy camera used was a one-shot CMOS color camera, the ASI2600 MC Pro and Optolong L-Pro LPS filter. The Veil Nebula is in the constellation Cygnus and lies at a distance of 1400 light years from Earth.
    3 points
  2. NGC 6205 or Messier 13, the image was captured using the ASI2600 OSC & Optolong L-Pro filter and 13 minutes of exposure time. Included in the optical train was the ES ED165 mm APO Air spaced F/7 Triplet refractor.
    2 points
  3. Ring nebula Sky-Watcher Mercury 70/500 AZ3 canon 1100D astro modified iso 3200 exposure 2min30sec , 0.5sec per frame processed in DSS
    2 points
  4. I could not help capturing another image of Messier 104, the Sombrero galaxy. The image was taken on 05/15/2021 at 10:35 PM ET, using a 165 mm APO Triplet refractor and ASI2600 mc Pro color camera. Total camera exposure time was 60 minutes at -25 Celsius.
    2 points
  5. The Eyes Galaxies, located in the Virgo Cluster, with a distance between 50 – 52 million light years away. NGC 4438 & NGC 4435 are 100,000 light years apart, with an apparent magnitude of 10. The image was captured using 88 sub-frames at 60 second exposures each. The equipment used, an Explore Scientific ED165 mm F/7 FPL-53 APO Triplet refractor and ZWO ASI2600 CMOS one-shot color camera (OSC), along with a Baader Moon & Sky-Glow filter. There are multiple galaxies identified in the image, others were to faint to make out.
    2 points
  6. A Daystar Quark Chromosphere Hydrogen-Alpha filter with an internal telecentric Barlow at 0.5 Angstrom bandwidth was used. A Televue 2.5x Powermate used with a Lunt 80MT APO refractor and Altair Hypercam 174m monochrome camera, cooled.
    2 points
  7. The Sun’s surface in Calcium light (half disk) was captured using an Altair Hypercam 174m monochrome camera, fan cooled and Daystar Quark Calcium H-line filter with a built-in telecentric Barlow. The second image (right) of the Sun’s Chromosphere was captured using the same camera equipment above, but in addition a Daystar Quark Chromosphere Hydrogen-Alpha filter with an internal telecentric Barlow at 0.5 Angstrom bandwidth was used. A Televue 2.5x Powermate & SharpCap was used to magnify and stretch the image. The telescope used, a Lunt 80MT APO refractor. Solar processing
    2 points
  8. This is our closest star, “The Sun”. The image of our planet was added to show the scale of “Earth” in comparison to several solar prominences. The solar prominences were taken on April 12, 2021 at 12:54 PM ET, using a Lunt 80MT APO refractor, Daystar Quark Chromosphere H-Alpha filter and Televue 2.5x Powermate, with 200 sub-frames stacked. The camera used, an Altair Hypercam 174M mono CMOS camera.
    2 points
  9. Hopefully this is an improvement on last year's image, this should have been 4 hrs or so, but what with wind and cloud (it was supposed to be clear) it ended up at 75 mins of 60's, 60's due to wind and cloud.
    2 points
  10. M10 star cluster Sky-Watcher Mercury 70/500 EQ1 - no tracking canon 1100D astro modified iso 800 exposure 10min , 1sec per frame
    1 point
  11. That's me, David, getting the observatory ready for a clear night.
    1 point
  12. The Eastern Veil Nebula. The telescope used was an Explorer Scientific 6” Air spaced APO Triplet refractor at F/7, and ASI2600 CMOS one-shot color camera, along with a Optolong L-Pro filter.
    1 point
  13. Whirlpool Nebula Sky-Watcher Mercury 70/500 AZ3 canon 1100D astro modified iso 1600 exposure ~17min , 1sec per frame processed in DSS
    1 point
  14. Wow! This is one of the clearest and most detailed image of sunspot I've ever seen!
    1 point
  15. M81 & M82 reprocessed.
    1 point
  16. The image of the galaxy Messier 63, also known as the Sunflower Galaxy was captured using an Explore Scientific ED 165mm FPL-53, APO Air Spaced Triplet refractor and a ZWO ASI533 MC Pro CMOS color camera. Total exposure time was 35 minutes, with a camera temperature of -22.3 Celsius. Polar alignment and tracking were achieved using plate solving.
    1 point
  17. Deleted and reprocessed the image, found a dark spot, mostly likely dust.
    1 point
  18. Aah! I see, yeah that can make a difference to track, even with a fast focal ratio scope.
    1 point
  19. Wow! The Crab Nebula. This is a tough target (at least for me lol). Well done there mate!
    1 point
  20. It has been pretty much cloudy with occasional rain here in Atlanta, GA for the past week. So, I have decided to start working on building a radio astronomy telescope with a 1.5m dish. My project will not make a dent in the field of radio astronomy, but it should yield some radio observations of the sun during cloudy days and maybe I will figure out in the future how to link several more dishes up to listen to faint DSOs. The image displayed here is of the galaxy NGC 4303 (center), a member of the Virgo Cluster of Galaxies. NGC 4303 lies 55 million light years away from our planet a
    1 point
  21. The partial image of the North American Nebula also designated NGC 7000, was captured using 65 sub-frames at 60 second exposures each, with a camera temperature at -24.1C. The processing software used was PixInsight, Adobe photoshop. The North American Nebula lies at 1,500 light years away from our planet and is in the constellation Cygnus, close to the star Deneb.
    1 point
  22. NGC 6503 - A wider field of view, image captured. There were 142 sub-frames used to capture the image of NGC 6503, with a camera gain of 230, cooled to -21.2C. The telescope used, Explore Scientific ED 6.5" APO triplet refractor at F/7 and a CMOS one-shot color (OSC) camera.
    1 point
  23. Nice picture. Hope to see the Moon close up like that soon.
    1 point
  24. The solar photography equipment used was a Lunt 80MT APO refractor, Televue 2.5x Powermate and Altair Hypercam 174M mono camera, cooled.
    1 point
  25. Hi Tan, no unfortunately I never got into facebook, but I am on LinkedIn. Thank you for all the likes!! I'm looking forward to return the favor! Oh, btw, try investing in Pixinsight, and Adobe Photoshop (subscription). Astro Pixel Processor is ok too, but it looks like PixInsight is the best, IMO. Just keep practicing. What skies are you imaging in? My skies are Bortle 5 - 6.
    1 point
  26. Note: On the Siamese twins, there is an error. The designation should read, from left to right: NGC 4568 and NGC 4567.
    1 point
  27. NGC 4565, also known as the Needle Galaxy. Taken with a ES 165 mm APO refractor and Starizona 0.65x focal reducer & flattener.
    1 point
  28. NCG 6720 in the constellation Lyra.
    1 point
  29. Very nice Dean, that lunar image is very sharp!
    1 point
  30. Glad you got to see it and image it at sufficient resolving power to show Saturn's rings and Jupiter's Belts. Top image! I only managed a brief glimpse on the 20th December and the 21st and 22nd were clouded out. Have a good Christmas and stay safe.
    1 point
  31. Good to see Captain Jean-Luc Picard's great great great grandfather in the picture
    1 point
  32. I dare say that it is Mount Olympus.....
    1 point
  33. Yes Reggie, I thought Syrtis Major was very prominent this year.The last time I managed to image this feature was back in 2014.You really notice the passing of time when you have astronomy for a hobby. Stay safe George
    1 point
  34. Great, George! I noticed the polar cap was smaller, too. But Syrtis Major more than made up for it
    1 point
  35. Must have been imaging at roughly the same time! Lots of detail Reggie your Big Mak does a great job! Best regards from George.
    1 point
  36. You got some great detail there, George. Nice work, buddy!
    1 point
  37. 99.3% moon Sky-Watcher Mercury 70/500 AZ3 2.5X barlowcanon 1100Diso 100 1/50s X 50frames processed and stacked with pipp+registax
    1 point
  38. Great image. Funny I’ve just literally tried using TDNAI too and it does work surprisingly well, I tried it on one of clavius too.
    1 point
  39. 1 point
  40. Looks like clouds to me!
    1 point
  41. Very nice, not overcooked! The stars are nice and tight too
    1 point
  42. 1 point
  43. The link is not to a 2" to 1.25" but to a T-2 mount camera body (no lens) / t ring / t mount - inserted into the telescope focuser as you may not be using the diagonal you may need a 2" long extension tube to use instead of it Before buying anything I would read up more on using a camera with your Evo 90mm
    1 point
  44. Super nice shot and what a great location!
    1 point
  45. Lovely shot. In terms of rarity, I liken it to photographing the Loch Ness Monster when a Unicorn gets in the way !!. I have a similar shot (Friday 10th July??) from Yorkshire but the comet was hidden by that right hand edge of the NLC.
    1 point
  46. "One of these is very large and a long way away, the other is much smaller but nearby" "No I'm still not getting it Ted" Composite of two images at different exposures to accommodate the wide dynamic range of luminosity of the two bodies. Canon 600D Canon camera with an EOS 90-300mm. telephoto lens at f=300mm. on a fixed tripod.
    1 point
  47. I think this one and the Triffid Nebula are my favourite shots from 5 years of astrophotography M31 is quite a tricky one to get right and it took a lot of effort to finally capture the data I needed to draw out all the detail. Not just that but the learning curve required to get the processing methods was a good 3 years work so don't be disappointed if you try and it just comes out all wrong keep on going and you will get it right remember, no pain no gain in this game.
    1 point
  48. This is one of my favourite pictures from your collection Mark. Fantastic Veil. Love the 'pixie dust' at the end of the broom : )
    1 point
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