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Showing content with the highest reputation on 29/03/21 in all areas

  1. Back in October I found this faint object by surfing in Taurus on Aladin Sky Atlas and did not recognize it until I started processing and suddenly realized I was looking at the Baby Eagle. Seeing was not the best and processing was quite challenging. I have now had the EZ star reduction script in PI to have a go at it. It really helped to suppress the star field to a level that lets the faint nebulosity shine. Data gathered with a RASA 8 and ASI2600MC, 73 x 4 min at gain 100. I like they way this combo can bring out colour and light in objects that often look rather dull.
    9 points
  2. Nicely packed parcel today brought me this very nicely built (think WO build) Long Perng 80mm F6 widefield refractor. It's 15 years old but hardly used, and came with a nice carry case lined with foam, retracting dewshield with metal dewcap, about 15 internal baffles (literally!), very smooth 2" Crayford with 1.25" reducer and integrated dovetail which also fits on a standard photo tripod. No finder needed as my low power eps can act as finders! This should give me lovely low power widefield views such as x16 (Aero 30mm) and x40 (Nagler T2 12mm). Not a high power scope but that'
    8 points
  3. Taken on 6th March, 72 minutes with the Samyang 135mm f2 and Canon 6D (cropped).
    6 points
  4. For my grab & go set up... Daytime tests in a TS Photoline 115 Triplet are very sharp edge to edge, I'm very impressed being used to Ethos and ES82s. Just waiting for first light, tonight looks good.
    6 points
  5. Succumbing to fashion, I ditched my trusty £1.87 Amazon AZGTI power cable for a Lynx Astro job... Accompanied by an OVL 1.25" UHC filter.
    6 points
  6. Evening all. Had the Celestron 8HD in galaxy imaging mode the other night, but could not resist having a look at the Moon. I had a go at the three little craters named after the Apollo astronauts and found them a bit more of a tougher prospect than I had at first presumed..... anyway...another story. The camera is an Atik 414ex mono. CCD, probably not the accepted first choice at Lunar imaging. Setting it on 0.001secs exposure I just let the scope track back and forth across all the illuminated areas. My thinking was to later pick out maybe 5 or 6 key images and stitch the
    6 points
  7. Relativistic jet motion from M87. Raw data taken from MAST archive from propositions dating from 1999 to 2018. Each set contained 4 frames of which I picked the best one from each year, manually aligning and rotating in photoshop by using difference blending mode and free transforming. Applied false colour and smoothed in SAOImageDS9 Instrument: STIS/NUV-MAMA Filter: MIRNUV
    5 points
  8. This is our setup as it stands but it’s very much a work in progress. We’ve only had a small telescope - a Sky-Watcher 1145p with EQ1 for a few months. Many of the ideas I got via old threads on this forum. Really wanted to avoid a GEM mount but I’m now getting to quite like it. Mind, it’s not so great for my daughter as I have to set everything up first, find a target (sometimes with a bit of help form her) and at that point we can both take in the view through the eyepiece. And being in Southampton, Bortle 8, doesn’t make it any easier. Although tinkering (I do enjoy tinkering) and tig
    5 points
  9. I enjoyed some nice views of the Nova with the 10" dob this evening. Popped the DSLR onto the dob and grabbed an image. M52 is quite clear as is the coma
    5 points
  10. Clear skies forecast, but nothing more than a five minute window materialised. Did a bit of tidy up in the dome instead, hoovered and whatnot and took a few photos of the gear
    5 points
  11. An external USB port, thanks Jesper I've now fitted it to my homemade external power box
    5 points
  12. 5 points
  13. He brought me this my new to me (2nd hand ) telescope which contained this little beauty A ioptron Photron RC6 looking forward to getting it all set up and ready for it’s 1st light with me
    5 points
  14. Gathering H-alpha data on IC 443, the Jellyfish Nebula, with the APM 80 mm F/6 triplet, 0.8x focal reducer, and ASI183MM-Pro
    4 points
  15. I managed to image the nova last night so here's a blink with all of my original data from 05/12/2020 and last night, 28/03/2021. Nova V1405 in Cassiopeia. My previous image, taken 12/05/2020 was 5400 seconds of Ha data - 30x 180second exposures. It was taken during a new moon from a dark location. I knew last night's image would not be a perfect match since it was taken from a Bortle 6 location with a nearly full moon, but it did allow me the opportunity to match the framing and exposure time enough that it makes the nova really stand out in this blink.
    4 points
  16. I've been observing the sun regularly for about 5 years and have quite rigid procedures for setting up, observing, and taking down which have served me very well, but today I made my first (and I hope last) mistake. When observing I was distracted by an innocuous conversation about something I had to do later on which in itself was nothing but in hindsight I stopped thinking about what I was doing and started thinking about what I had to do later. When it came time to pack up (which was soon after as I was no longer able to concentrate) I took the wedge out of the scope and immediate
    3 points
  17. Hi everyone, Sorry, it's been ages since I've posted anything here, as my sketches tend to be a bit rough around the edges so I'm never really sure whether to post here, or on the observing report forum and just attach my very rough sketches there. Anyway, I was just pleased to: firstly get out with the scope just recently, and secondly, to make out some of the fainter stars in the trapezium which had eluded me before. I then noticed the lovely grouping of stars near to the Orion Nebula while i was taking a wide-angled view of it. So I also took a closer look at the stars there and f
    3 points
  18. This is me. Ironing out a few wrinkles in some new gear.
    3 points
  19. Some rare clear skies here. Same forecast for tomorrow too I took some snaps of M3 whilst taking in some sights with my binos (including looking at M3 for the first time). Look closely to see the glowing cats eyes in the image. My little "helpers" have a new trick of rubbing against the tripod which does wonders for the images
    3 points
  20. Caught it in the Tak and the 12” dob tonight. Looking pretty similar to my eye, perhaps a smidge dimmer than before. I tried defocusing until it disappeared, which it seemed to do just before HD220770.
    3 points
  21. I've managed to image it ok again this evening and initial measurements put it at 8.1.
    3 points
  22. I've just split Sirius reasonably easily with my ED120 at 225x = the seeing is GOOD
    3 points
  23. Got the Tak FS 60 Q out for tonight
    3 points
  24. All delivered today, thank you to @mikemabelfor the 48mm t ring to connect my FF to my dslr. Then two other purchases a concertina type travel stool to fit in my backpack when walking to a couple of good viewing spots (very sturdy it is too) and care of 3dashtronomy a batinov mask for my 72ed with matching colour to dovetail livery (bit ocd I know) hoping it stays clear this evening to try it all out, for a later session now clocks gone forward. Clear skies
    3 points
  25. This is NGC3603 and NGC3576 (AKA The "Statue of Liberty" nebula), a massive H-Alpha region containing a very compact open cluster, located in the constellation "Carina" about 20,000LY away. I took this photo during two nights, 14th and 15th March 2021. Imaged using a active cooled and full spectrum modded Canon 40D DSLR attached to a 80mm f6.25 refractor on a CGEM equatorial mount. Total exposure time was 3 Hours and 31 minutes in natural color through UV/IR Cut filtered subs from a semi rural sky. RGB: 19x60s, 19x120s, 18x180s and 20x300s subs @ ISO160
    3 points
  26. Got some new bathroom reading books
    3 points
  27. Asteroid 9 Metis currently rises in the early evening at magnitude +9.6. It will appear within Virgo in opposition to the Sun on 2021 APR 04 at magnitude +9.5, and near the bright star Spica in August. Metis is possibly the core of a larger destroyed asteroid. It was discovered in 1848, and has a mean diameter of 190 km. Photos and descriptions of Metis would be welcome additions to this thread.
    3 points
  28. Here is a video on my Budget Pier build for my EQ6 R Pro. I previously posted a video on my Budget observatory build which seemed to help a few people with ideas so hopefully this will do the same. Clear skies everyone.
    2 points
  29. Got 2 hours 2 minutes on the Jellyfish Nebula (IC 443) with my APM 80 mm F/6 , Tele-Vue TRF2008 0.8x reducer, ASI183MM-Pro and Astronomik 12 nm H-alpha filter. Stacked in APP, quick stretch in Gimp. Needs more data (perhaps also O-III), and some suppression of the halo around Propus Still, pretty pleased how this turned out
    2 points
  30. Totally agree John. On the eyepiece, clearly it’s aimed at the Leica ASPH, a wonderful eyepiece that has ruled the zoom roost for the past 6-7 years. When I bought my Leica (sadly now sold) it was about £480. It’s now £650+, and the Starlight adapter to turn it into an astronomical eyepiece is (an equally astronomical) £200. So if the APM is in the same ballpark optically, it will be a winner
    2 points
  31. @vlaiv @Budgie1 @david_taurus83 Vlaiv was absolutely spot on. Manual flats at 0.35031 work perfectly. I must have a bug somewhere between camera and APT. 6x300 on the Monkey Nebula with 10 Darks and 10 Flats and a very quick stretch looks like this. Now I can crack on with some imaging! Thanks again guys.
    2 points
  32. Had a crack at using the old 15x70 mounted on a monopod. Looking at these finders I’d say I saw it. The other nearby star is still about a magnitude fainter... invisible with the sky brightness and moonlight. Not everyday you get to see a Nova. Peter
    2 points
  33. We should soon know for sure whether a Dioptrx will fit. The first redesign wouldn't, so I sent my spare Dioptrx to the makers in China so that they could use it as a template. They received it last week. I'll report back in due course.
    2 points
  34. Could not agree more - 0.4" RMS is just within reach - you need to get out and spend more time under stars looking at those PHD2 graphs - only way to improve one's guiding
    2 points
  35. No, you are just another crazy AP obsessed loon like the rest of us
    2 points
  36. Not tonight Jeremy. Monday night is ED120 night Just had a look at the Nova V1405 Cas with the ED120. I think it has dimmed very slightly. It's still brighter than the nearby mag 9.0 star but not quite to the extent it was when I last observed it. The latest AAVSO visual report says mag 8.0 which seems reasonable.
    2 points
  37. Time for the Tak FC 100, John?
    2 points
  38. looks like the Double Cluster is the winner. Thanks all
    2 points
  39. Hello First picture of this lunation. a lot of turbulence with very short moments visible details. So I often work in infrared 807 and 742. the same image in two resolutions 100% for 4K and 75% for small screens. Clear skies. Luc 75% http://www.astrosurf.com/uploads/monthly_2021_03/605e4673705c7_AUSUDDECLAVIUS2403202121H28NEWTON625MMBARLOW4FILTREIR807QHY5III178M75LUCCATHALA.jpg.1d6ce1c17af808dc6d26cabbc7c8b61c.jpg 100% http://www.astrosurf.com/uploads/monthly_2021_03/605e468c25a24_AUSUDDECLAVIUS2403202121H28NEWTON625MMBARLOW4FILTREIR807QHY5III178M100LUCCATHALA.j
    2 points
  40. A few nice proms on view today and steady seeing here. Dave
    2 points
  41. Some lovely examples of M42 shared here On my first attempt imaging M42 I stuck to 1 exposure time (45s iirc). To solve the issue with a burned out core I stitched in the core from my unstretched file (which I stretched a little to get the right luminosity). Allowed me to shoot all the data at 1 exposure time. Image below with about 45 min of data.
    2 points
  42. Bookmark this page, it should help... https://nextspaceflight.com/starship/
    2 points
  43. I think the general consensus is that the four digit number is the serial number, and the two digit number is the year.
    2 points
  44. Soon I will get a pillar in my garden and I was looking for a solution to put up my equipment in a quick and repeatable way, without leaving everything outside. A good acquaintance who is a very good metal worker and also into astronomy made this. It's so nice. I have to align it once to the pole when the pillar is placed, and then fix the screws on the underside (the small azimuth screws are only necessary for first alignment) and then I can just put it up and take it off and be pole aligned within seconds... So happy and such a nice piece of work.
    2 points
  45. Here's my blink. My original image blinked with the image from Sky & Telescope showing the position of the nova. I'm hoping to capture it later tonight.
    2 points
  46. Looks like there's someone crushed underneath the table.
    2 points
  47. Eqmod cable for my heq5 which is probably stuck on the suez canal somewhere
    2 points
  48. A quick picture of the Beehive Cluster.
    2 points
  49. Some BAADER filters arrived this am. Thanks Francis.
    2 points
  50. The observant will notice the dome is closed - a 2 month old refurbished pc packed in last night - so currently unable to image. Which is prob no bad thing looking at a) the moon b) the moisture in the air c) cloudz Nice lunar halo all the same
    2 points
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