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Showing content with the highest reputation on 13/03/21 in all areas

  1. I’ve been participating in online forums since the dark ages. Usenet during the 90’s and bulletin boards before that. In all that time I don’t think I have come across a forum as good as SGL. I don’t just mean Astronomy related either. Online forums full stop. Friendly, polite, welcoming, non judgemental or patronising, respectful with excellent advice from contributors with a wide range of expertise. I’ve not seen a moderator have to “step in”, which says it all. The technical side is excellent too. A sensible non garish colour scheme and great support for images and links.
    22 points
  2. First light for my Sharpstar 61 mk2. A very short session when the clouds cleared, just 90 mins (18x5) integration with a ZWo 533mc
    12 points
  3. I have been blessed with four nights of cloudless skies over the past week so I have taken advantage of them by capturing M51, despite the blustery conditions. Generally I am very happy considering the size of the scope that I am using to capture this. This is made up 4.5 hours of luminance, 2 hours of Red, 2 hours of green and 2.5 hours of blue. Taken using a Meade 6000 80mm APO, HEQ5 (belt mod), ZWO 1600MM It is 10 months since I purchased my deep sky rig and M51 was one of the first targets that I imaged, albeit with a different scope and using a DSLR, and I have inclu
    10 points
  4. Here's a wide view of the IFN around M81 & M82. Can just make out Arp's loop and Holmberg XI. Taken with the Samyang 135mm f2 and Canon 6d, about 3 hours of data in 2 minute subs on the Star Adventurer. (Flats and dark bias, no darks.) Had to crop it down a bit as the framing wasn't great, I was literally shooting in the dark on this one. Wish I'd moved over to the right more to catch more of the brighter nebulosity, but I didn't really know what to expect until I stacked it. The inverted BW version shows the extent of the IFN a little more clearly. Fi
    8 points
  5. My first attempt at the Double Cluster captured over two nights during the snow moon at 96% and 98% illumination from a Bortle 7 zone 8 miles south of Manchester. skywatcher Equinox ED80 pro Canon eos600D
    7 points
  6. Went back to my comet NEOWISE images from last year and had a go at stacking some frames to pull out a little more detail. Used it in this timelapse, after finally working out how to get it to display properly in portrait mode on mobile devices. Taken from Caradon Hill on the edge of Bodmin Moor dark sky park. The annotations were inspired by this recent APOD by Nicholas Lefaudeux. (My image is less detailed than his, so has fewer annotations.) His page on the comet is well worth a visit, particularly this animation showing the spiral jets.
    7 points
  7. The OP's blatant 'like' farming. Mods?! The forum is great, but don't believe all the nicey niceness. There's crackin' gang fights at the SGL star camps. Imagers vs observers, then the faction fights with the beanie wearing big dob lot armed with two inch cheshires and apo owners weilding Berlabach tripod legs. 'orrible!
    6 points
  8. After a day of mixed weather skies looked very clear Thursday 11/3 so headed out around 9pm to take advantage of a moonless night. Walking in straight from bright lights seeing & transparency were looking good - double cluster & beehive were naked eye visible with direct vision and some Messier dustiness in Auriga with an averted view. I had a vague plan to have a proper go at the Leo Triplet & had spent a bit of time on stellarium to plan how to star-hop in via Chertan & L73. First though I North aligned SynScan on Sirius and Mars (the top 2 suggestions thrown up by the
    5 points
  9. This is about 3 hours with the ASI2600mc and the L-enhance. A reprocess - stacked in APP with the extract Ha and Extract Oiii algorithms then processed in PI using the SHO-AIP script C&C appreciated
    5 points
  10. I want to share the nice observing session I had last night. I was out from 8pm to 10pm. After the showers the sky cleared and the transparency became almost unreal. I went out after dinner and was very excited to be able to spot the Beehive and the Double cluster with naked eyes from my SQM 20 location. It was still windy so not a night for high mags. I decided to focus on open clusters and DSO and mounted my 6 Inch Newt (The £100 C6N which was a real bargain from @FLO while it was available). I am using EQ5 in manual mode with a tiny 6x30 finder so a big part of the enjoyment is the '
    5 points
  11. This is my set up ready for action a few days ago now, i still need to try and sort my cables out,
    5 points
  12. Hi all, I've just posted all my February images from February 2021 to the British Astronomical Association Solar Section and thought others might appreciate the last months solar activity. Scopes used were the Lunt 60mm DS and 80ed stopped down to 60mm. A Zwo Asi 178mm camera was used for all the images and false colour was added in Photoshop CS2. Stacking software was the freeware Autostakker3 and ImPPG. Images were taken between the 12th and 28th February 2021
    5 points
  13. I suppose a legitimate question that can / should be asked is what will all these marvellous eyepieces that have been proposed show with the Tak 76 that the OP's current BST's and Baader zoom won't show ? In a number of cases (including my own suggestion) the proposals could involve spending £1000 plus. So just what does that buy in terms of tangible / specific performance gains over the eyepieces that Nicola currently has ? (I'm asking for a friend )
    5 points
  14. Did someone say eyepieces worthy of a Takahashi?
    5 points
  15. On 16 December 2021 at approximately 22:00 UTC, comet C/2021 A1 (LEONARD) will cross the orbit of Venus. Approximately 3 days later Venus will pass through the exact same piece of Space! Whilst looking on 'The Sky Live' website and using their 3D Solar System Viewer to see the track of the comet, I saw this! Makes you think!
    5 points
  16. Hi All, I am selling my completely as new Skymax Pro 180 mak Purchased new from FLO 6th Nov last year so just over 4months old. . Bought it on a bit of a whim as had spare cash burning a hole in my pocket and it was one of the few scopes that was in stock briefly at end of last year. Personal circumstances have changed for me and I need to sell. It is completely unblemished and pristine , has been be used twice only and was stunning on binoviewed moon - main purpose I bought it . In fact it is better than new as I have fitted a new Baader clicklock adapter to rear cell to repla
    4 points
  17. GEMINI NEBULA NGC 2371/2 - (ap. mag 11,2) This image confused astronomers when it was first studied — rather than being classified as a single object, it was instead recorded as two objects, owing to its symmetrical lobed structure (known as NGC 2371 and NGC 2372). These two lobes are visible to the lower left and upper right of the frame, and together form something known as a planetary nebula. (in:Nasa) To me it looks like a candy, to my wife like an eye and to many people like a peanut. At the end what matters is that you let flow
    4 points
  18. Hi all, My current image, still WIP, but I'm sharing this Hydrogen Alpha image as I thought it looked ok... This is NGC3603 and NGC3576 (AKA The "Statue of Liberty" nebula), a massive H-Alpha region containing a very compact open cluster, located in the constellation "Carina" about 20,000LY away. I took this photo on the night of 19th February 2021 using my cooled and full spectrum modded Canon 40D DSLR attached to a 80mm f6.25 refractor on a CGEM equatorial mount. Exposure time was 3 Hours and 50 minutes (6x600sec, 6x900sec and 4x1200 sec subs), using a 7nm H
    4 points
  19. Finally got my hands on a wide field apo, as I was struggling to get the nebulae in my FOV with my ED80.. Super excited..!! weather has been, and will be, horrible here in London for the foreseeable future, so no chance to try it out, but astronomy tools and Stellarium suggest I will have a good chunk of the sky in my fov with the 294MC Pro. Ivreally like the focus rotator and the option of the tilt adaptor, but I wouldn’t dare touch the later. Feels very solid and well made. Super excited..
    4 points
  20. That's one of your shortest ever answers, Vlad! (But it is up there with the best of them...) Keep 'em coming! lly
    4 points
  21. I usually groom mine once a month, lol. Seriously though telescope cat has lots of dust on the corrected plate and I've ever only cleaned the mirror once in ten years.
    4 points
  22. I would strongly recommend sending an email to FLO regarding flatteners/adapters with your 102. Your message will reach the eyes of Ian King who will give you all the information you need. In my early imaging days I used an ancient Vixen super polaris. The polar scope was extremely good. The gears were very good with quite a low periodic error. The main problem I encountered was controlling backlash, it was a fine balance between excessive slop and binding gears. This didn't present any problem until I started trying to guide. With a short focal length scope you should easily be abl
    4 points
  23. Blimey Mike, that was brave. I'm surprised Chris allowed you to post a photo of the two of you on SGL. If I remember correctly, that's the pic I took when she told you you couldnt buy a DZ.
    4 points
  24. 4 points
  25. This grand-design spiral galaxy is in the constellation Canes Venatici and is about 23 million light years away. What fascinates me is how this galaxy interacts with a smaller galaxy (M51B) in the way of ripping it apart. Amazing to be able to see this with our amateur telescopes. I managed this in just over 2 hours imaging time with a waning crescent moon on 6th March last week. My skies are Bortle 6. Lights: 92x90secs (ISO1600) Canon 650D Optolong L-Pro filter SW200P Reflector (no wind for a change) CC's welcome Widefield Image: Zoomed Image:
    4 points
  26. If there will ever be a program called Astro Gear, Vlaiv will be The Stig.
    4 points
  27. Thanks to Vlaiv for a little encouragment to get this one across the line! This is my first DSO with the ZWO ASI 1600mm, I feel like I'm not quite there yet but it's certainly an improvement for my pictures. This is a bit of an unconventional set up, waving a 12 inch Newotonian around as an imaging scope but it works and it is good fun. I have moved my Lakeside focuser onto the stock 300PDS focuser and it performed very well too which is a bonus. I was using 300 second/5 minute subs with 1x1 binning at unity gain (139) with an offset of 15 which gathered plenty of detail and meant fe
    3 points
  28. "So I am a Jonah, no doubt." @teoria_del_big_bangdon't be like that - we're all scientists and don't believe in any of that superstitious mumbo-jumbo. "But I will try again" - actually, just to disprove the theory, would you mind not? I've got my fingers crossed that the next one goes ahead and I'd rather you didn't jinx it... But more seriously, Star Parties are great - been to the SGL one and the Bwylch Astro Camp and they were a hoot. I think this forum is such a great place because we haven't fallen into that modern 'social media'-age trap, and we treat peopl
    3 points
  29. I felt a bit intimidated being a relative newbie imager too going to star camps but planned my first one in 2019 but was flooded out, last year covied out and booked another one in March but again Covid put an end to that one. So I am a Jonah, no doubt. But I will try again, I think the things you could learn as a newbie being with some of the members on this forum with your own gear there and able to ask questions would be invaluable, and the fact that people are just so friendly would be an absolute bonus. So I will try again and urge anyone to do the same. I think this forum is so gr
    3 points
  30. Lol, don’t forget the elitist Tak owners running away from the ruck cradling their scopes with their noses in the air. innocent humor Asside, this is the greatest place for anything astronomy, if I lost it I would feel like I lost a good friend.
    3 points
  31. I thought the faction which brought more beer would win. Don't count on me for the next one.
    3 points
  32. I have not been around long enough to get involved in star camps yet. (Newbie imager). But you have now really sold it too me. I thought it would all dull and talking about astronomy. Gang fights and dob cannons - sounds great.
    3 points
  33. I can only admire Martin's answer above, which represents exactly my own thinking as the technology evolves. Olly
    3 points
  34. Sorry to be a kill-joy, but I think that the visual acuity and the technique of the observer, combined with the prevailing seeing conditions, are probably more important than having the very highest quality telescope and eyepieces money can buy. And I'm not just saying this because I cant afford either .
    3 points
  35. Since I have owned telescopes I have always adhered to the maxim ‘thou shalt not clean the optics unless it is absolutely necessary’. This is definitely the best advice and it takes a very long time to reach the stage of ‘necessary’. However, after owning my C8 for twenty years I decided this week that we had reached the point of ‘necessary’. The corrector plate was very dusty on the outside with some resin marks and, somehow, a spider had found its way inside the scope and spun a web on the back of the corrector plate. The said spider had also, like a malicious burglar, pooped on th
    3 points
  36. I think they have to be sent to a specialist cleaners, lol.
    3 points
  37. Tried to clean my CAT eyepieces today but didn’t go to well !
    3 points
  38. It’s bad enough waiting for clear skies at night in the uk, waiting for the sun ? That’s just crazy talk !!!
    3 points
  39. Built a few rockets in the past, most of them printed. And all of them were 'real' rockets. This time I'll build a rocket out of the '50 era. First man on the Moon were actually Tintin, captain Haddock and Bobby, the dog. It's a very beautiful machine I think. Most of the parts already printed. In fact the trigger to make this rocket was a friends challenge to grow hot peppers in a not so 'logical' way.... The challenge is to grow his peppers upside down. The question came from a group of people busy growing only peppers. Purpose is to make the challenge as original as possible. Well
    3 points
  40. Another attempt at blending RGB stars with an SHO image. This time the stars were taken with an ASI294MC osc (10 x 120s) and the SHO with an ASI1600MM (20 x 180s of S, H & O) both on the RedCat. The image is heavily cropped because the 294 sensor ended up at 90 degree to the 1600 when I mounted it on the EFW. OSC data taken through an L3 filter. Interestingly the focus point (checked with a BM) was identical for the 294 and the 1600 when using the L3 filter. As always C&C welcome. Adrian
    3 points
  41. Agreed, it’s brilliant, and the standard against which I judge other discussion sites (in fact I haven’t found another that comes close, astronomy or otherwise). Well done and thanks to all. Long may it continue.
    3 points
  42. This forum is without doubt the most friendly and helpful place I have ever had the pleasure of being a member of.
    3 points
  43. It's a great place isn't it. It's made that way by the members. With SGL it doesn't matter who you are or where you are from, we are all part of the same family
    3 points
  44. Wonderful, isn't it? Great people over here. And it's not mentioned enough, but I agree: the theme of SGL is great and very easy to navigate. On mobile too. The last update made it even better.
    3 points
  45. Glad you like it here I do too
    3 points
  46. 5 minute drive to the top of the South Downs. Did this for the first time last week and as a newbie to to all this, I was amazed at the difference. Saw more than I had from back garden and viewed a couple of ‘shooting stars’ to add to the experience.
    3 points
  47. The weather gods must have finally been appeased over Melbourne last night, so I captured some RGB data at long last! HERE is the finished Astrobin version with RGB stars added. Given my LP conditions I used 20 x short 2min subs each Chroma RG&B. For those interested in this technique, to boost the starcolour "naturally" in PS I changed modes from RGB to LAB colour, then adjusted the curves in Channel B, which only affects Blues & Yellows, then back to RGB for the overlay in PS using 'screen' blend mode. That one's all done now, time to move on to a new target!
    3 points
  48. If you plan to observe the Beehive, then another open cluster, M67 is close too. Near to Pleiades is the cluster Hyades the head of Taurus. While you're thee clusters M36, M37 and M38. All in the above are south east-south west mid evening. In the northern sky try galaxies M81 and M82. They will fit into the 25mm eyepiece field of view. Small smudges but galaxies nonetheless. That lot should keep you busy on a first time out. Don't give the targets a quick glance. Spend some time looking and they should pop. Install a mobile app like Sky Safari or Stellariu
    3 points
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