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Showing content with the highest reputation on 06/03/21 in all areas

  1. This faint nebula is made up of Integrated Flux Nebula (IFN), which according to Steve Mandel-Wilson is dust lit up by by the energy from the integrated flux of all the stars in the Milky Way. For being IFN, I get the impression that this nebula is relatively bright, but it certainly took quite a bit of stretching to bring out. Numerous galaxies can be seen hiding behind the dust. Captured 4th and 5th of March with the RASA 8 and ASI2600MC (gain 100) without filter. 85 x 4 min, so 5.7 hours. Thank's @wimvb for suggesting this cool target! EDIT: Added the annotated image pro
    22 points
  2. Here's a 1h25m timelapse showing M31 setting behind the trees, with a guest appearance from a Starlink satellite train. Taken on the 1st March 2021 from 7:55PM to 9:05PM. Moonrise was 8:40PM, as it rises its light washes out the detail in the galaxy. Taken with the Samyang 135mm f2 and Canon 6d, using just 10 second exposures. I processed the first frame in PS (mostly using Noel's actions) then used batch processing to apply the same workflow to all 360 frames. Hope you like it, more details here if anyone is interested.
    20 points
  3. Since about 6 months now, I've finally got the pleasure of a back garden observatory. In the area of the Netherlands where I live, sky conditions are terrible for regular, broad band deep sky photography (the SQM-value varies about 18 magn./arcsec). That why I like to visit dark sites like @ollypenrice's Les Granges every once in while. One of the great benefits of a personal observatory is that you don't have to setup and brake down your equipment for every imaging or observing session. To be able to do deep sky imaging from my back garden with narrowband filters, I decided to go down the ZWO
    17 points
  4. A clear night was promised for yesterday and I was full of eager anticipation to try for some new objects. As often seems to be the way, the cloud persisted a lot longer than I had thought it might; looking out at about 11pm, thin cloud was visible pretty much across the whole sky. Not wanting to stay up late only to be disappointed, I almost shelved my plans for an observing session, but I thought I would hold on just a little bit longer to see how things developed - and I'm so glad I did. By about 11.25pm, the cloud had all but cleared and the moon, not yet up, was not around to spoil
    14 points
  5. 12 x 15s each in LRGB, Samyang 135mm @f2.8, Atik 460 + EFW2.
    13 points
  6. This was partly paid for with a Waterstones gift card for my birthday. I'm looking forward to dipping in and out of this. Shown next to my pocket Sky Atlas and Cambridge Double Star Atlas for scale. The new book is quite chunky as it contains 470 pages! Dave
    13 points
  7. The promised hole in the sky duly materialised tonight over Hampshire and, barring the odd drifting bank of high cloud, delivered some fantastic views before moon-rise. I'd been mulling over upgrading from the supplied SW prism for a while and having enjoyed splitting doubles over the full moon plumped for a Tak prism which arrived in the week. Tonight I was keen to test this on some familiar winter clusters and add a few of the Messier objects I'd missed before they slip over the spring horizon. I've done enough trips to the park unmolested to now feel quite comfortable & so took m
    10 points
  8. I've had my OVNI night vision for over 6 months now but poor health has meant little observing. However, I managed almost an hour tonight on the first really transparent moonless night since Xmas. I used my 10 inch f/4.8 Dob at prime focus, both with and without a 7nm filter from my Bortle 4 sky. With Orion high in the south it was a natural target. Oh, my God! What a feast! M42 was spectacular. It was huge - so much bigger than I was used to! I then spent the rest of the session just sweeping the area. Almost everywhere I looked there was nebulosity! I carried on longer than
    10 points
  9. Little and large. Looking forward to trying a 2" eyepiece and the Baader is for the Omegon flip mirror. Thanks @HollyHound and @Second Time Around
    9 points
  10. Over the years my approach to planning an EEVA session has changed. Until a few years ago I used to scour books like the Night Sky Observer's Guide for interesting-looking objects and prepare a list based around such gems. Nowadays I try not to peek beforehand, and prefer to leave the selection of objects to near-chance. What I've found is that there is nearly always one object that takes my breath away when it appears on the screen -- the unexpected object of the night. Sometimes it is an object from a list I'm working my way through; at other times it is something that looks intriguing on th
    7 points
  11. I don't usually image star clusters but with the moon so full recently I thought that the stars would shine out bright still! I had heard that there were nice Twins in Perseus and decided that these open clusters (NGC 869 & 884) were worth imaging. I think it was worth the effort!! 60x30 secs (ISO800) SW200P Canon650D Optolong Pro Filter CC's welcome. Gerr.
    7 points
  12. Hi folks. Here's a capture from last night of this earth-crossing asteroid, scheduled to have a very close pass again in 2029. Firstly, apologies for the horrendous gradient on the images. There was some stray light coming from somewhere, and I was sumultaneously enjoying a party via Zoom, and the jovial ambience and wine meant I didn't take it seriously enough! Anyway, as you may know, Apophis was discovered in 2004 and it was briefly thought that it might collide with earth in 2029. It's 370 metres across, so would do a fair bit of damage, but latest calculations show that it'
    6 points
  13. Hi my fellow stargazers! The sky last night wasn't the best, partly cloudy with high haze. This did not deter me though as it's been over a week since my last observing session due to overcast skies. Seeing a few breaks in the clouds, I rushed outside like a mad man, much to my wife and kids amusement. Alpha Centauri was shining through a gap so I turned my 10" on it and got a nice split. Twin pale yellow headlights in a mist! This is our closest neighbour at just over four light years away ( Proxima in the same system is a bit closer). Lovely sight. Seeing Sirius shining overhead and rel
    5 points
  14. This little fella tumbled very slowly through 13 minutes' worth of my subs on the Hyades a few nights ago. First time I've made an animation out of this sort of thing. I was surprised at how slowly it was moving (and a little annoyed, if I'm honest ).
    5 points
  15. Mainly taken with Esprit100 and 0.79 focal reducer/Atik460EX on HEQ5 However it was almost a full Moon and I didn't get a lot of Oiii and Sii and no clear skies forecast in the near future, so I utilised some Oiii and Sii from 2014 done with my WOZS71 and Atik383L, thus increasing the Oiii from 40mins to 2 hours, and the Sii from 40mins to 1 1/2 hours. Ha entirely from the Esprit/460 Ha 12 x 600 (2h) Ha 8 x 900 (2h) Ha 3 x 600 binned x 3 (error!! but decided to combine it). 30mins Total Ha 4 1/2 hours. Oiii with Esprit/460 8 x 300 binned 40mins Oiii with WO/383 9 x
    5 points
  16. A nice little Evoguide 50 & Flattener from the Widescreen Centre....Ordered yesterday and just came now
    5 points
  17. Mars, Pleiades and Hyades with a cheeky NGC 1646, 29x30 sec 1600iso 3.2f 50mm, plus extra Beehive cluster 5x30sec same settings, stacked in dss and processed in ps, the slight glow in the bottom left of the Pleiades image is when a neighbour decided to turn on all the lights in their house, thus creating more LP for me. Never going to win any awards but I'm happy with the results so far, stars are a bit eggy but Omegon lx2 mini track was playing up a bit, good to get some nebulosity in the Pleiades though and NGC 1647 in shot. Clear skies
    5 points
  18. Bought a set of 3nm narrowband filters - Antlia - a Chinese company - very kean pricing v's the incumbant premium brands, based on just this one image I am impressed with the result s as the subs for this image were all taken over three sessions of the weekend 26-28th February so full moon conditions. Camera ASI1600MM - gain200 / -20degC 36 X 300s for each filter, Ha / Oiii / Sii - 9hrs total subs Stacked in APP, processed Pixinsight and PS CC Two colour pallettes , first is a straight forward Hubble SHO and the second a blend of various pixel math ratios and equations.
    4 points
  19. One really clear night up here on 4th March, so I made good use of it. Firstly I started on M42 and managed 22 minutes, between trees. The results are in another thread in here. Then switched back to NGC2244 and got more data on this target to add to data from a couple of nights ago, then this started heading behind the trees as well. So I managed 2 hours on M51 (24x300s). The kit is ZWO ASI294MC Pro cooled to -10°C and gain of 120, SW Evostar 100ED Pro on a EQ5 mount using PHD2 & APT. Stacked with darks, flats & dark-flats in DSS & post processing in PixInsight.
    4 points
  20. Managed 4 hours and 48 minutes on the Spaghetti Nebula, using my Sigma 50-100 mm F/1.8 zoom at full aperture and 100 mm, with the ASI183MM-Pro, and Baader F/2 H-alpha filter. Stacked, gradients removed and automatic stretch in APP, and some tweaks in Gimp I should perhaps use a bigger aperture for this, and create a mosaic, but I am quite pleased with this first effort on a difficult target
    4 points
  21. Interesting possibility mentioned on the BAA website here
    4 points
  22. Cambridge Double Star Atlas is one of my faves!
    4 points
  23. @tonylumley - got out with the new prism last night. Had intended to do a side by side comparison but it’s so much better it wasn’t really necessary. Messier open clusters really pop and focus to pinpoints in a way they weren’t with the SW supplied diagonal. Lots of contrast, inky black backgrounds and nice colour transmission. Eta Cassiopeia looked stunning. More than anything it feels as if I am looking through the telescope rather than at an image, if that makes any kind of sense at all. Posted some more detail here:
    4 points
  24. New Zwo ASI 178mm camera for my baader k-line scope arrived yesterday for my dual solar imaging rig. Already up and running this morning, lol. Great camera for solar imaging.
    4 points
  25. I have just received my Nagler 3-6 zoom. I had one years ago but sold it on. During the past year I started using Ortho EPs again and enjoy using them but adding a Barlow caused inward focusing problems. So to get some extra mag I bought the nagler zoom. By the way I have been using baader extension rings on my ethos EPs for years without any difficulty.
    4 points
  26. Arrived a couple of days ago Lunt 1.5 to 2 inch adapter
    4 points
  27. And this time it was Amazon that dropped something off. A phone / tablet holder for the AZ100. Nice liitle holder that’s all metal. Just adjust the jaws so they are almost touching, lock with the big locking wheel on the back then use the top knob to adjust the upper jaw and lock the phone or tablet in place. Works much better than the simple type of holder with just one locking knob on the back. I had already made a mounting bracket with a finder shoe that fits one of the dovetail saddles so simoly fitted a mini tilt head with a finder foot to the holder.
    4 points
  28. This set up lives in my living room. TS Photoline 115 Triplet Apo and a Stellalyra 6" Classical Cassegrain on a Teleoptiks Ercole Mini Giro and a Berlbach Report Tripod. The whole rig weighs less than 20 kg including diagonals and EPs and I carry it fully assembled on to the balcony outside and am viewing in seconds on the Apo at low power, and not too much later on the CC6" which cools quickly. The Apo gives lovely sparkly wide field views, sharp as you like and contrasty. Fits the whole of Orion's belt in one view and the CC6" gives surprisingly bright detailed views of DSOs like
    3 points
  29. Heya, Had another clear morning with fair seeing. Seeing was around 1.2 arc-seconds to 1.5 arc-seconds for most of this, it barely supported the 120mm aperture, but I wanted to get moderate-high resolution captures of the two AR's while they were still around and active before going back to work. There's a rather large prominence off the limb near AR2806 and the opposite limb has a great eruptive surge prominence region that was pretty active all morning that is rounding the Eastern limb. Might be interesting soon. PST etalon + double stacked 1.7A 8mm blocking filter tilted in a Skyb
    3 points
  30. Dear all, I'm just coming in from the terrace where I did a charcoal sketch of the H alpha solar disc. We can see the active regions AR12806 (in the bottom) and AR12807 (a bit lower than the center). The sketch is left/right mirrored. Telescope: Lunt LS 50 THa B600 PT Eyepiece: Celestron X-cel 10mm Date & Time: March 6th, 2021 / 1430-1500 CET Location: home terrace, Dusseldorf region, Germany Technique: natural vine charcoal on white Hahnemühle Ingres mould-made pastel paper Size: 24x31cm  Clear and sunny skies! Achim
    3 points
  31. I've posted more times in this thread in the last 12 months than the previous 12 years (yeah, I know the thread isn't that old but I like headlines!) Just received this very day via SGL's classifieds :
    3 points
  32. And then suddenly, your scope is the limiting factor......
    3 points
  33. Just bought the 12.5mm Morpheus Thanks peeps. I've only been here a day and already I've learned masses. You lot are SO friendly and helpful!
    3 points
  34. Received this New guide on Wednesday. Cheers Dave
    3 points
  35. Hi Gavin, I’m new to all of this having only had a telescope for a couple of months. Well, technically it’s my daughters. So I’m not as qualified as many members here. However spec wise our telescope is very similar to yours. I’m also in Southampton which in my apart of town is around Bortle 7. Still we’ve had some fun and success from the back garden. As far as dark sky’s go this is what I’ve found. The supplied eyepieces aren’t great. For me I had a 25mm, a 10mm and a 2x Barlow. The 25mm is OK but the 10mm poor and the 2x Barlow next to useless. I’ve now replaced all but the 25mm (
    3 points
  36. When comparing the two remember that one is a planet where you are seeing a rocky surface with dark markings through a very thin atmosphere, whilst on the other we see the top of a reflective atmosphere of hydrogen & helium. Also, whilst the sizes shown are no doubt accurate mathematical comparisons, don't forget the solar system s dynamic, and the apparent size to us of a planet depends on where it is on its orbit compared to ours. Mars was close enough to Earth in the summer for even my beginner telescope and cheap eyepieces to show me several surface features, including what turne
    3 points
  37. Hi @StuartT and welcome to SGL. As per @Waddensky says above. One thing I have noticed, (and maybe others), is that since my local authority, [Wokingham], have changed to LED from sodium street lighting is that the night sky is a little darker and better higher up. You could ask your local authority, (i.e. Oxford City Council or Oxfordshire County Council), to shield the offending streetlights, if you think the light-spill is invading and disrupting your sleep pattern or privacy. You could or may need to submit some non-astro images to highlight your case.
    3 points
  38. As my EQ5 adaptor is off at the moment.... 556 g with fixings and 32mm extra height. Nexus dsc with tray, balljoint and cables is 564g. The Pan & Tilt handle with bracket is 318 g . (On my coffee scales.} The bare mount as sold, with encoders and slowmos, is 8.2 kg on a spring balance. Eg no clamps, counterbalance or other options. Any one able to weigh other parts?
    3 points
  39. Not really. The light pollution filters available are not very effective against modern LED lighting, and they are not magically turning your skies to Bortle 1 anyway. It's sad, but to avoid light pollution you need to travel. Another approach is to change your targets. Planets, the Moon, double stars, carbon stars and some open clusters for example withstand light pollution very well and they are lovely in their own right.
    3 points
  40. Including the nexus, tray and cables, mine is 11.6 kg - with cw bar but no counterweight. Also includes the base adapter to fit an EQ5 tripod.
    3 points
  41. Also includes LBN445, LBN449, LBN453, v419 Cephei. Total integration: 7876 minutes/131+ hours (153/204 x 300/420s or 37h for Ha + 632/47 x 300/420s 58h for O3 + 153/185 x 300/420s or 34h for S2 + 60 x 120s for OSC). Cameras: QHY163M (16mp mono) and QHY247C (24mp OSC) CMOS cooled to -20 and -15 degrees C. Telescopes: Takahashi FC100DF Steinheil fluorite doublet and Stellarvue SV70T triplet apochromat refractors @ f/4.9 and @ f/4.8. Reducers: Takahashi FC-35 (0.66x) and SFFR70-APO (0.8x). Mount: Paramount MyT. Filters: 1.25" Astrodon 5nm Ha,
    3 points
  42. cant believe i missed the 3.7 ethos for sale, im never coming on this posty thread again . its a bit like "look what you could of won "
    3 points
  43. For doubles, I have the Cambridge Double star atlas. I image the pages to fit one atlas page on to four A4 sheets, then convert to B&W, and annotate each target double. I add in a few of interest which aren't on the atlas. So, where a star says 1.4 25.5, it means the secondary is 1.4 mags fainter than the primary at a distance of 25.5". All I do is take one sheet from my folder and have that at the scope. Being in plastic it doesn't suffer the elements.
    3 points
  44. I used a TAL screw in crosshair reticle. No longer available but do show up used occasionaly. Fits any eyepiece of about 25mm.
    3 points
  45. Hi, I was trying to take some deep sky photography in Orion with my Canon 60D and Tasco 9VR on an unguided GP mount. It didn't really work out but just on a whim I took a few single shots with the same settings (30sec exposure, iso 1250) of Mars and the Pleiades. Image brightness adjusted in post processing. I might see if I can get a better result tomorrow with a shorter exposure. Thanks for looking, Clear skies Peter
    3 points
  46. Mars is deeply disappointing for most visual observers. It is as you describe most oftentimes just a orange dot that looks very much like a star but a bit bigger. But think about what you're looking at and how far away it is and it becomes more magical, in my mind at least. You found M42 also and managed a photo of it which is recognisable and that is an achievement. I struggle to find targets manually so cheat and computerise the whole process but that throws up a whole load more issues and frustrations, not to mention cost. Wait until Jupiter and Saturn are visible though. Boy are
    3 points
  47. John Dobson's original design used an LP record as it has a grooved surface. The Sidewalk Astronomers, founded by John, later moved to a pebbly finish much as you describe and found a product called "Ebony Star" gave a smooth action. I had the pleasure of meeting John in Pontefract in 2002, courtesy of the West Yorkshire Astronomy Group. He was quite a character and told a good many fascinating stories, not just about astronomy. He was a very knowledgable guy.
    3 points
  48. There is a BST 12mm in the Sales/Trade section atm. It's one of the best budget eyepieces.
    2 points
  49. 2 points
  50. The postman brought me...a Rainbow Astro RST-135 mount! I've had an iOptron CEM25P pretty much since starting the hobby in 2018 and have been battling with DEC backlash issues for over a year. So once the last paycheck went in I fully intended to get a CEM70G as the upgrade to hopefully solve my issues and also use my EDGE 8 HD for imaging, but then I thought about having to set up 17kgs of mount every clear night...and plumped for the RST-135 instead! No mount balancing, no counterweights needed for my widefield rig and light (3kg)! I hope to get first light tonight and I'm hop
    2 points
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