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Showing content with the highest reputation on 02/10/20 in all areas

  1. Hi. full ASTROBIN CTB1 is very cool and medium dim SNR G116.9+00.1 in Casiopea. Below I caught 58h in Ha, OIII and RGB 70x1200s Ha 80x1200s OIII RGB average 8h QHY695A, Ioptron CEM60-EC, TS APO100Q Have a nice trip through the photo Tom
    17 points
  2. This is my biggest ever project, something I never thought I was gonna be able to do. A 15 panel mosaic of the North America nebula region shot with both my setups at the same time. I used my ASI294MC Pro with the AT106 to shoot Tri-band and Ha and my QHY183M on the TS65Q to shoot Ha and Oiii so the total integration time is 150 hours but the imaging time is half of that. Before the mosaic I have the cameras swapped between the 2 scopes but I changed them over for a closer field of view and pixel scale between the 2. I started shooting the mosaic in April this year and I finished it last month. Using APP, I extracted the Ha shot with the 294 and Ha filter and the Ha and Oiii shot with the tri-band. After that I stacked all the Ha and Oiii for each panel and blended them all in APP. I used pixinsight Starnet++ to remove the stars from both Ha and Oiii, I blended them into the HOO image and worked on it until I was ready to put the stars back. I'm really pleased with the result, it might not be perfect but I can say that it's my best astro image so far. I hope you like it too. Emil Astronomik 6nm Ha Clip-In Filter: 450x300" (gain: 200.00) -15C bin 1x1 Baader Planetarium O3 1.25" 8.5nm: 450x300" (gain: 11.00) -20C bin 1x1 Baader 1.25" Ultra-narrowband 3.5nm Ha: 450x300" (gain: 11.00) -20C bin 1x1 Altair Astro triband: 450x300" (gain: 200.00) -15C bin 1x1 Integration: 150.0 hours Darks: ~50 Flats: ~30 Flat darks: ~100 Bortle Dark-Sky Scale: 6.00 Mean SQM: 19.14 For the 158mpx, full resolution (11972x13212) photo please follow the link to my astrobin account: https://www.astrobin.com/full/1mtzac/0/
    17 points
  3. Taken through hazy high cloud (yet again) but primarily as I had finally put together a three scope widefield system and needed to align them all. I hadn't gotten it quite right and also discovered a spacing issue which led to some weird corners hence a decent crop, but a lovely object and one to which I return to a lot. This is approx 25-30 x 180" each of RGB. Thanks for looking
    14 points
  4. We had a rare evening of excellent seeing from the UK. With Mars at 40 degrees altitude and 22.4" diameter, lots of fine detail was recorded across the disk. Syrtis Major and Hellas region are central in the two images attached here. Peter
    13 points
  5. Out observing Mars this evening, the last time was on the night between Sunday and Monday. In the last session I saw the Syrtis Major area in magnificent detail, seeing was stable and in the excitement I forgot I wanted to draw a sketch of it (a neighbour stopped by and we observed together). Before going out tonight I made a practice sketch from memory based on the session before and saved it in my sketchbook even though it was just a test of sorts. Never done any planetary sketching really. Tonight I saw an area I hadn’t seen before and this time I gave sketching it a go. After a while I saw a familiar vista rotate into view, the dark patch I had just drawn at the five o’clock position turned out to be Syrtis Major right where I started observing the session before. Really enjoyed the connection between sessions and the good seeing tonight. Some thin cloud but it didn’t really matter that much. Here are the two sketches, first the one from tonight’s session, the Elysium region I believe, and then the test sketch of Syrtis Major based on the view from four nights ago.
    12 points
  6. At over 22 arc seconds in diameter Mars is an awesome sight in the eyepiece, with detail almost throwing itself at us. Below is last night's sketch which shows Syrtis minor almost bang on the meridian. It was another one of those nights when you feel you've seen all there is to see, but you just can't step away from the eyepiece.
    12 points
  7. Nice night last nice, first clear one in a while, and no wind to boot! Quick capture of about 8000 frames, stacked best 2000. F20 on the 12 LX200gps. I really noticed the northern polar clouds last night visually. Some real times of cracking transparency. Ed
    9 points
  8. Ordered yesterday delivered today great service FLO. One problem there were a few more clouds (and lots of wet stuff) in the box than expected...
    9 points
  9. Some nights bear fruit, and sometimes not what you'd planned - in this case, I'd intended to run a few hours on Mars to make an animation of it's spin Technology said no! Various things decided to misbehave - collimation was being a pain and Stellarium refusing to Sync the scope being the main time-sinks. Time for radical action: Take off the imaging train, slap in a diagonal and take a look with the old Mk1's. It's easy to forget, as primarily an imager, how stunning the views can be! Mars was showing plenty of detail to my eyes and shone like a marble on black velvet! Brain and PC rebooted, back on with the camera etc for take 2. Luckily, apart from a smattering of wispy high cloud, the night was still glorious and the issues where put to bed In the end I was able to gather 30 stacks of 500 frames, 1 per minute for 30 minutes (and a detour to the moon, because it was so shiny!). Not quite enough for the animation I had planned, but plenty for my new favourite software WinJUPOS! Celestron C8, asi178mm, Astronomik ProPlanet 642 IR BP filter, ROI capture @640 x 480: Raw SER files stacking in AS!3 Resulting tifs sharpened in Pi with the Restoration Filter Aligned in imPPG De-rotated in WinJUPOS (animation compiled from the tifs with PIPP) 1:1 400 x 400 crop 2:1 resample Sharpened tifs, animated. 30 minutes doesn't show much rotation, but it's there! The detour netted me this too, which makes me happy - the moon has been so low in the sky I've not been able to get the scope on it for ages! Frustrations aside, a clear night is good for the soul!
    9 points
  10. After a day of changeable weather the late evening sky mostly cleared of clouds so out I went. Seeing was quite good. Mars is climbing quite high now so the view at 22:30 BST was the best I have had so far of Mars this time around. The polar cap is very small now and seems to have lost it’s intense whiteness. Syrtis Major and Mare Cimmerium were the most prominent features. Overall a nice view of the Red planet Takahashi FC100-DZ, Binoviewers at x217
    8 points
  11. Hi, Below are a few images that I took on the evening of 27 September, conditions were not perfect, with the usual annoying breeze and fast cloud coming in from the west. Images taken using my Intes MK67 Maksutov and ZWOASI178MC camera. All images were shot as RGB24 and AVI output format. Then processed through Autostakkert, and then tweaked using a combination of GIMP and Affinity Photo. I am little disappointed because I could not fully carry out some of the advice that I was given, in my last Mars image post. I am basically trying to get a faster FPS rate without sacrificing resolution (ie) which is what happens when you start binning at BIN2. With my ZWOASI178MC camera and SharpCap 3.2, there does not seem to be a way in which one can "reduce" ROI size, when working within a large resolution capture area of say 1920 x 1200. (or so far, I have not figured out how to do it) When imaging with the ZWO178MC and SharpCap, one is unable to use the mouse to draw a smaller ROI box and the adjustment numbers which are displayed alongside the ROI box, only seem to effect "Pan" and "Tilt", and have no reducing effect on the ROI box. I am now thinking of imaging at colour space RAW 8 (to give me "8 BIT" capture) and also switching my output format from AVI to "SER". Does anyone else do this? Will it result in me obtaining a faster FPS rate, to give me better images? Very grateful for any feedback on this. Probably a lot of us out there who are not using the best settings on our cameras to get the best images ! Regards, Steve
    8 points
  12. Hi all, with a small window in the cloud forcast i wasnt going to waste it so i thought I would have ago at the planets, something I havent done for a few years. The seeing was poor and I had to relearn how to use my old scope and camera. I got jupiter and Saturn but gave up getting Mars as moon glow and mist put an end to the session. So here they are, taken with my old and dusty SW 127 mak and a ASI 120 mc ( that old usg 2 is so slow! only managed a max of 5 frps! } I know they could be better but im pleased with the results. Hins and tips welcome thanks for looking.
    8 points
  13. Here's my latest effort, NGC-281 The Pacman Nebula. At approximately 9200 light years away it's quite a large beastie covering around 40 arcmins. It was discovered by E. E. Barnard way back in 1883. Total integration time was 900 minutes even split between Ha, Oiii and Sii. All processed in Pixinsight.
    8 points
  14. Hi All, best of the bunch. I'm convinced the colour and fuzzy nature of the image is an aspect of the camera. There was some thin cloud last night but that helped things especially visually. So if I can move any further forward it may be time to go Mono with a filter wheel or if the iPhone project I'm going to attempt works then who knows.... Any suggestions always warmly welcome. Its all about the journey Kit: Celestron C9.25 xlt, QHY5III290C, 2.5 x Powermate. Processed in Registax & tweaked in Gimp. Thanks for looking. Steve
    8 points
  15. Mars imaged yesterday evening using my Tak 150mm refractor with ASI224MC and 3x Barlow lens (approx 3.3m focal length). Best 50% of 3000 frames. Processed using PIPP, AS!3, RS6 and DxO PhotoLab3. The views through the eyepiece at 272x were sooooo good CS, Andy
    8 points
  16. I haven't had much luck with Jupiter with my setup (Celestron 6SE, Canon EOS 60D). This image from last night is probably the best so far - but would I be right in saying the dark cloudiness are artifacts from over processing? (I tried to reduce them as much as possible.) Anyway, I suppose it's all a learning curve and trying to squeeze the last bit out of your equipment until you decide on the upgrade! (Time: 20:30 CET; Barlowed x2; 7000 frames captured, best 20% used)
    7 points
  17. Hi All I’m normally lurking in the Planetary Imaging space but I thought I’d venture in here for the first time. Aren’t there some fabulous images in here? I normally use a dedicated camera set up but just thought I’d have a pop last night. It’s taken through a C9.25 and 10 mm Delos. Thanks for looking. Jarvo
    7 points
  18. I shot this last week, but just got around to processing it this morning. Thanks for the peek. Clear Skies John
    6 points
  19. Far from good seeing but at last its kind of recognisable - to me anyway This is a stack of the best 25% frames from 20000 taken using my ASI 290MC tonight. The moon was very nearby but I don't get many nights without clouds so thought I would still give it a go. I left the scope outside for 6 hours before taking this to make sure the temperature had stabilised and that definitely helps. Also reduced the gain on the ASI 290MC This is with the 2x Barlow so about 4700mm Gain 159 exp 3.4ms This is no Barlow so 2350mm Gain127 exp 1.3ms
    6 points
  20. Dear Stargazers, I have updated my visual back on my 180 Mak recently (https://stargazerslounge.com/topic/363512-lightweight-visual-back-for-a-180-mak-with-micro-focusing/) and have to report that I am very happy with the micro-focusing option I have now. Last night I had the chance to test the new setup with my ASI 224 MC camera. The prime focus length when imaging is 2400 mm with an ADC in the light path. Here some sample images: and first time imaging Mars, getting ready for opposition. I just made one mistake, I removed the ADC, which you can see in the image. Let me know what you think and hope you enjoy the images. Clear Skies, Alex
    6 points
  21. My first time ever shooting the Veil. This was the first decent night we've had in a very long time. We've had terrible weather all summer so I haven't been able to image anything for a couple months. This is also one of my first images with this new camera. New camera, full moon, moderate light pollution (Bortle 6), faint target, not optimal filter, and only a couple hours to work with, I certainly wasn't expecting much. I'm happy with what I did get though. I'm honestly slightly more impressed with the full field of stars than I am with the nebula complex itself. QHY247C WO Redcat 2" Baader Moon and Skyglow iOptron CEM40EC 38x180s lights, 30 darks, 20 flats, 20 dark flats Processed in Pixinsight with final touchups in Photoshop.
    6 points
  22. Got mine a few weeks back. Not had much chance to use it as yet but initial results look very promising. Adrian
    5 points
  23. A bit of a sentimental title, agreed. I used to go to Iceland in winter quite regularly. Walking through ice caves and hunting the northern lights. Maybe this routine will return some day. Anyway: If you have witnessed the aurora you know that it can change quite rapidly. In this picture some highlights from a particularly active night at the shores of the glacial lake Jökulsárlón in Iceland I changed the position a bit to capture the action in the sky and as the intensity varied quite a lot, I also changed ISO. The top image is 20s at ISO 3200, the middle and bottom image are 20s at ISO 800. The 14mm lens was used wide open at f2.8 The Samyang lens had a hero's fate in Iceland. It was attached to my camera on top of a tripod. Iceland is a windy place and as the equipment was left unattended for a few seconds it was blown over. The lens took the hit and fell apart. The camera survived without a scratch.
    5 points
  24. I 've recently aquired an sxv-h9 mono camera, to see what's all this fuss about mono. Athough it is an old camera, it has a very succesfull and classic sensor. I can see why!
    5 points
  25. Using the 102S frac on Celestron GoTo, I had to aim low, and that leaves me the southern sky only! 7.00pm – sky quite light and clear, Jupiter low, aligned on him using the lovely new 17.5mm Morpheus (great look, feel, performance, big eye lens and plenty of eye relief for a glasses wearer – a fine EP). The Galilean moons showed up with the ‘scope, Io and Europa forming a short diagonal across the “usual” line. Better view going from x34 to x67. Mushy x150. On to the doubles (GoTo [via SAO numbers] performing very well for each): 54 Sgr – (2)+1, 46” – still only Jupiter naked eye – easy split x34, faint companion at 1 o’clock, primary slightly orange. Good start. Beta Cap – (2)+(2)+1, 3.4 and 4.4 minutes, wide visual triple – very easy x34, fainter companion at 10 o’clock, faintest at 5 o’clock, with seen separations exactly as expected. Very pleasing, the evening’s highlight! S710 Sgr (South’s Catalogue) – 6.3” – no split x34, got it x67, fainter star right above. Omicron Cap – 22” – easy split x34, fainter star at 8 o’clock. Sigma 2325 (Sct, Scutum) – 12” – easy split x67, much fainter companion at 8 o’clock. All going very well, so something tighter next: Rho Cap – 1.6” – sky darker now, but more faint stars in the x34 / 2.22deg field anyway. This one needed more mag – x200, diffraction rings came in and out of view, but no split – at x240, I believe I detected some up-down elongation, and that was the best I could do. Low altitude, some thin cloud, a rising full Moon, and diffraction rings all contributed to the difficulties here. All in all, a very successful two hour session, finishing with a quick look at Saturn and Titan. Doug.
    5 points
  26. Mars will be hugging the Moon all night tonight!!! Should be a lovely spectacle. I don't think it will do much for telescope viewing but through binoculars or naked eye it should be a treat
    4 points
  27. Woop woop! Back in the mono! Wanted one of these for ages and this package came along and I couldn't refuse! Now I just need a scope...
    4 points
  28. There is nothing wrong with your computer. Do not attempt to adjust the picture. Flo are now controlling the website. Flo control the horizontal, and the vertical. Flo can deluge you with a thousand channels, or expand one single image to crystal clarity... and beyond. Flo can shape your vision to anything our imagination can conceive. For the next hour, Flo will control all that you see and hear. You are about to experience the awe and mystery which reaches from the deepest inner mind to... The Stellalyra telescope Please stand by.
    4 points
  29. Yes, Alan, my "stinking" ED103s gave "stonking" views! Vin, the wooden tripod isn't a Vixen, it's a home built (not by me) affair which I've had about 10 years, fixed height and very robust - in fact, these days it carries the FS128 on a Tak EM2 mount. The fixed height isn't a problem as I use a variable height observing chair. Your TeleVue scope sounds great, I'm sure it would probably match the ED103s in a head to head. I really like the Vixen oversized aluminium tubes though..they look impressive but are actually very lightweight. Clear skies all! Dave
    4 points
  30. Wheels fitted. My wife wants to use it to collect the autumn leaves! Thank you to Stephen my neighbour for drilling the holes in the aluminium and steel.
    4 points
  31. I was inspired to sketch for the first time last night too, although I just grabbed a pad and a pencil, I might try colour next time. When comparing my effort and what I remember seeing with maps and images from last night it all starts to make more sense. I couldn't really make out anything below the main central belt, very indistinct, except for a few fleeting glimpses of a lighter area (Hellas). I hastily drew around a 2p coin to make the circles, about 25mm across for reference. As it turned out I didn't use the second circle on this occasion, just did it in case I messed up the first. This was through my 8SE with 8mm eyepiece.
    4 points
  32. Another 2 test shots from the observatory, dating to August 9 and 10. NGC884-869, The Double Cluster (5 hrs 25 min in 5 min subs) and M13, Globular Cluster (3 hrs 15 min in 5 min subs), shot with the Altair Astro Hypercam 269C Pro TEC (gain 565, offset 25, @ -10°C), calibrated with 50 flats and 48 darks, processed in PI. 8 inch Newton/MPCC mkII/8x50 QHY5 finder guider on NEQ6.
    3 points
  33. EDIT: Changed the subject as I will place my all efforts for this opposition here. Had my first proper run at Jupiter and Saturn with my C6, ASI 178 MM, Wratten 29 filter. I'm lazy so the C6 still has its 6.3 reducer/corrector screwed in, and then I barlowed it out to an unknown focal length... Reasonably happy with the results though. Both are 2 minutes of 10 millisecond frames.
    3 points
  34. Here's my first processed image using the ASI6200 with my FLT98. I've binned it 2x2 in software as little real resolution is lost. It's a centre crop to just show the galaxy. L = 3.9 Hrs total at gain 0, RG and B = 1.6 Hrs total each at gain 100 (3.2 x actual gain), and HCG mode. Sky brightness -21.34 using Unihedron. Processed in Startools. Small final adjustmests in Photoshop. I also tried blending in some Ha to Red but it just made the red patches brighter without really adding much so I left it out. Click for full size. Alan
    3 points
  35. Hi All So after all the help I got with the Iris Nebula. I thought I would revisit my Tulip Nebula. Also the EZ processing scripts are magic. 85 x 2 min Subs. over 2 or 3 nights, separated by a month, flipping weather Thanks for looking Mike
    3 points
  36. Thought you might like to see this .. I have an Ikharus 10”RC .. once made by Ian King ..I love the scope ... but a few people have mentioned the fact that the focuser is attached to the mirror cell .. and with the weight of the focuser and camera hanging off the back it’s quite easy to put it out of collimation . I had a couple of options .. sell the scope and buy another with the decoupled mirror , or modify mine .. ! I was especially nervous as the mirror is still in the cell as I didn’t want to disturb .. all turned out well though .. modified a tilt adjuster I had for the focuser attachment , and I have been plying around to see if the new set up places the leader beam in the middle of the secondary.. and it seems pretty good .. so will disassemble and clean the mirror properly before final assembly.. will post some more pics later ..
    3 points
  37. Had a break for a bit as I got side tracked by aquariums. Started up again last night with Mars. Cloud was coming in fast so I shot just 2000 6.5 millisecond frames each of R, G and B around 23:00 UTC. Processed in AS!3, Registax 6 and Gimp.
    3 points
  38. B 143 widefield from my 'grab and go' set up. Canon 6D, Samyang 135mm f 2.8, Star Adventurer- 65x60 sec ISO1600. Processed in Regim and PS Elements
    3 points
  39. My understanding is that the NBP is a UHC class of filter. My way of thinking about this is that a UHC enhances things which I can already see so that's a "nice to have". The O-III shows me things well that are practically invisible otherwise so that has been a tool that I have always wanted in my tool box. There have been periods when an O-III was my only deep sky filter and I've not really missed not having a UHC. The UHC's that I have now don't get used all that much but the O-III's are regularly used and I would really not want to be without one. I know what I'd be missing Knowing what I do now, the O-III would always be a higher priority for me than a UHC I I found myself with no deep sky filters. That's my findings over the years given my observing preferences, scopes and skies. Yours and others may well be different though
    3 points
  40. Can we keep replies under this classifieds advert to expressions of interest rather than comments on the merits of the proposition please ? Thanks
    3 points
  41. Great report Vin. Although a reasonably experienced general observer, I am a pretty much complete novice when it comes to Mars to be honest, so I found this thread very helpful, thank you. It's really whetted my appetite for more prolonged and detailed studying of Mars...now I'm retired, and we have the best opposition of Mars for several years imminent, I just hope we get some really still, steady skies to make the most if it in coming weeks! You have a great setup there, btw. I owned a couple of SP102Ms in the past, and really enjoyed them, and the Vixen equatorial mounts IMHO are still today far superior than the chinese clones. I did "graduate" to a later Vixen ED103s (very similar to John's ED203SS, but operating at F7.7 rather than F6.5), and honestly, it was a revelation, a real step up from the SP102M in every way see below).. The later ones also come with a very good dual speed R&P focuser. When you think that these had a retail cost of c £1700, yet you can get a good used one for around £600-£700, they represent great value and willi last you a lifetime. I was eventually lucky enough to acquire a Tak FS128, but the two ED103s scopes I owned were both superb, and incredibly potent when matched with a GP or GP/DX mount. Thanks again for a great post . Dave
    3 points
  42. First Moon sighting with the Heritage 130p and a phone camera.
    3 points
  43. After having fun with my little refractor, what else is there to do but to photograph it?
    3 points
  44. I only own 2 scopes these days and they're both fracs, and they've both featured in this thread previously. So...here's a photo of what I bought with a Father's Day gift in 2019 from my daughter and son in law.. it's a hand-made miniature of a 19th century "Comet Seeker" refractor telescope. It was made in the USA by a model maker called Barry Crist in 2005, made out of solid wood and brass. The equatorial mount can move about in both RA and Declination too. It's about 17cm high maximum. These are now quite sought after as there weren't many made and the maker has now retired. It sits in our lounge and I often look at it on winters nights and wonder about the amateurs of 150 years ago and what they observed back them, in much darker skies I imagine. The last 3 pictures are of a lovely little book I got online around the same time last year, including a specimen page of observing notes/tips. If you're a true refractor fan, this is a real treat on those cold, damp evenings in front of the fire/log burner with a glass of your favourite beverage .. If you're interested, you can find it here: https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://www.amazon.co.uk/Half-Hours-Telescope-Popular-Amusement-Classic/dp/1330053397&ved=2ahUKEwiOvNW5ipTsAhWVrHEKHe-lCWIQFjABegQICxAL&usg=AOvVaw01RZbPsmLfejHObYGwS2-V Dave
    3 points
  45. Nice to read that you had a good view and enjoyed yourself Vin, I too was out and enjoyed similar views and conditions. I was using my fine ED103s Vixen, which I highly rate, it’s a stonking scope and a bargain used. Mars is truly giving this time round, not a dust storm in sight......thank goodness.
    2 points
  46. Quiet Sun again. A few small proms round the limb and AR 2775 still visible in double stack set up. The Sun is now getting very low and the seeing is not good, especially as I have to view above roof tops and it’s cold enough for many to have their central heating on.
    2 points
  47. We should observe together sometime David, that is if this virus is ever brought under control. Sometimes local seeing can kill definition. The sketch above represents around 20 minutes of study, continually adjusting the focus so as to maintain a sharp image, so it's not how I see things at first glance. ☺
    2 points
  48. The archetype Cepheid variable delta Cephei for example (~900 light years away) has a parallax of 3.77 mas so the distance uncertainty from Gaia would be 0.04/3.77 = ~1% . If we found a Cepheid with the same period as Delta Cephei in another Galaxy we would know it has the same luminosity so by measuring its apparent brightness we can work out how far it (and hence the Galaxy) is Robin
    2 points
  49. This! I recognise those 'manly arms' in the second video
    2 points
  50. Getting there. A few more tweaks to the poles, some wheelbarrow handles and a strut for the bearing and maybe something to guide the alt az movement and then back to fuzzy hunting.
    2 points
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