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Showing content with the highest reputation on 03/09/20 in Posts

  1. I decided to reprocess my M100 data from last year. This time, I decided to present the image in a much wider field of view, which has the benefit of highlighting the various background galaxies. The other notable changes are that the blue spiral arms are emphasized more and the overall brightness of the central galaxy has been increased. At just over 12 hours integration time, this was taken with my Esprit 150. Alan The original version is here:
    18 points
  2. Omega Centauri My first image here in the lounge! This April was a great month for Astrophotography. My main challenge is moisture in the sky (90% humidity) and of course as I image from a bottle 8 zone, light pollution. At 11 pm everything is most often soaking wet and I normally call it a night. But the weather in April was better and I managed to get a couple of hours of good data every other night. Here is a higher resolution image: https://voelcker.com/omega-centauri My "export to jpg" process definitely needs improvement! Details: Acquisition: 130mm Apo
    14 points
  3. Finally finished processing my first mars this season. Plagued by thin high cloud saw the histogram yoyo-ing etc. But I did manage to get a few decent runs ok. Telescope - Celestron C11 Camera - Asi290mm Filters - Baader RGB
    10 points
  4. Well, it has to happen - The Last hurrah for the loaned solar scope, as it’s been returned Very grateful to be trusted with it for nearly 6 months Of course, seeing was dreadful, but I don’t think we can be too fussy when the sky is clear - so, this is 4 hours on Monday morning 8-12 condensed into 6 seconds Interestingly, this final data was when I discovered AS!3 can do batches of stacks, rather than doing each one manually for 120 frames! Could have used that nugget a few months back! Process for this was: Open all .ser file in AS!3, analyse, place grid and stack (25%)
    8 points
  5. First SHO palette image I've done. The processing was NOT easy! I started from scratch multiple times, but I've got the hang of it now. I think a lot of it had to do with the Sii and Oiii data being quite bad. I think it's time I moved over to PI... Total integration time is roughly 5 hours in 180 second sub exposures. SW 80ED DS-Pro ZWO 7nm SHO filters ZWO ASI1600MM Pro SW NEQ6 Pro ZWO ASIAir Pro SiriL StarNet++ Adobe Photoshop CC
    7 points
  6. My first serious attempt in a couple of years. Atik 460M. 10 x 5 minute Ha 6Nm, 9 x O111 5 Nm with WO GT81 no reducer (don't have one) on a CEM120 guided with PHD2. No Flats or dark's or bias. Kindly processed for me by David Shaw from our Society. There are lots of things that are wrong in the image some of which will (in time) be corrected by lots more subs and Flats. However I feel that from Bortle 8 skies and a 98% moon I am quite satisfied. It is a start.
    7 points
  7. My first attempt at Mars. I'm really pleased with how it turned out, despite being taken in poor conditions! Celestron C11 at f25 (7000mm). ASI120MC-S camera, 20ms exposures at 30 gain taken with ASIStudio ASICap. Best 100 out of 18000 frames, de-rotated with WinJupos. RGB channels were processed separately with Autostakkert and Registax, with final processing in Photoshop.
    7 points
  8. I set up my CPC800, with ASI224MC camera in the early hours to get some Mars images. There was cloud about but mostly Mars was in the clear. I did not use an ADC as Mars was at an altitude of 44 degrees, but the barlowed colour images stil needed a tweak of colour alignment in processing. Larger images are with x2 Omni barlow lens. Monochrome image taken with infrared pass filter. 5000 frame videos, best 20% processed in Registax6, and Photoshop Elements. Mars now has an apparent diameter of 19", getting closer to its opposition size. The South Polar Cap seems to be getting smaller.
    6 points
  9. I had my C8 SE out for some visual observing but did not get much done (full moon). There was some action at Jupiter so I put the ASI224MC and the ADC on to take some images. 5000 frame videos, processed best 20% with Registax6. The result was better than I expected with Jupiter at an altitude of 14 degrees. The image shows the Great Red Spot, some nice cloud detail, the shadow of Io and there ought to be a transiting Io there somewhere.
    6 points
  10. This GIF is an animation of 3.5h Jupiter's rotation There were 130 images for this animation, totaling more than 400 GB of videos and a final average of almost 1.8 million frames (~ 13,838/video). At the beginning of the night the seeing was not so good, but it improved considerably over the hours. This may include acclimatizing the telescope and reducing heat dissipation from the ground into the atmosphere .... Many details with good sharpening, including GRS and NEB outbreak. First image: 2020-08-29 22:45h UT Last image: 2020-08-30 02:11h UT Equipment: C11 "+ PM2
    5 points
  11. SH2-115. 8 hours Ha + 4.5 hours each SII & OIII = total 17 hours. (FSQ130 & FLI ML16200) I could have and perhaps should have given this a lot more time......but some things just not coming together for me ast the moment to make that happen.
    5 points
  12. I had one last go at this data and wasn't able to get a better result than my previous, especially in the core which is what I wanted to focus on. This challenge has really pushed me and this was the first time processing in SHO too. Thank you FLO and IKO for making this possible and working with such good data. One thing I would've loved was to get a drizzled integration so you can push the resolution and limits in the core to make it nice and crispy and defined. Here's a rotated version since I like it more and a cropped, zoomed in one Good luck everyone!
    5 points
  13. I've been really enjoying seeing all the submissions so far - it's a real pleasure to see how much fun you're having with the data and it's very inspirational to see all the different 'takes' on how to process this - each one brings something different to the table! This is going to be hard to judge!!!
    5 points
  14. Hello all, This is my latest image of the Eagle nebula (M16/NGC6611) in the constellation Serpens, this time imaged through narrowband filters using my 8" Celectron SCT, at F10 - 2032mm focal length, with my astromodded and active cooled Canon 40D DSLR. The second image is a cropped and rotated version to emphasize the famous "Pillars of Creation" part of the nebula, made popular by the HST image of the same name. The color channels are SII, HAlpha and OIII as RGB, and color balanced to remove the heavy green color cast created by the strong Hydrogen Alpha signal.
    4 points
  15. No stacking, point and shoot. iPhone 5s, SW Evostar 90, 25mm and 2x Barlow. Also used digital zoom of the phone.
    4 points
  16. After much consideration, I have been brave and pulled the trigger ....... https://www.altairastro.com/starwave-102ed-r-fpl53-refractor-459-p.asp We’ll see what happens next!
    4 points
  17. Hey everyone, I've been itching to get out an I thought I'd take the plunge last night - even if the weather looked dubious. I ended up having a whale of a time, and although I went out to get Jupiter I quickly got sidetracked by Mars. Anyway, it's my first post on the forum, and judging by other's threads I wasn't alone enjoying the semi-clear skies!
    4 points
  18. Hi everyone, and thank you for all the replies. As anticipated, it was something incredibly simple and an oversight on my part. I wasn’t using the diagonal mirror for the eyepiece. It’s amazingly clear now that I have all of the required parts installed Thanks again! Erik
    4 points
  19. I never took to the 21mm because it had a slightly poorer outer field correction in the 12.5" than the other Ethos focal lengths. Axial sharpness was excellent, as was contrast but it was obvious to me why TeleVue didn't stretch the focal length past 21mm. Even using my glasses to completely correct astigmatism (I see none at 31mm with the glasses on), the edge of the field displayed some visible astigmatism when running through focus from one side to the other. Granted, it is WAY out in the field, but the 17mm was simply sharp to the edge, as was the 13mm. Compared to
    4 points
  20. Update from retailer, they'll refund if I return it to them and reaffirming that I'll "never get a refractor telescope that is completely free of dust particles". (Which I do understand but the level of what's acceptable obviously varies.) Scope will be going back shortly for refund then and will look to buy elsewhere. Any chance you can sort me one out then @FLO (also with a flattener and test)?
    4 points
  21. ES Reid checked over my StellaMira 80 that I bought from FLO and the scope has been faultless and a great performer. Definately worth having done .
    4 points
  22. A super little book chocca with sky maps.
    4 points
  23. At long last a clear night in these parts, and a chance to view the red planet in all it's glory. Transparency was good after all the heavy rain, and seeing reasonable. I managed to observe for nearly 2 hours with the 155mm f9 APO, until Mars was eventually obscured by an inconsiderate holly bush. Fortunately, despite the attentions of my cat, I was able to complete a rough " impressionistic sketch" during the pre dawn hours. Hopefully, weather and dust permitting, more will follow in due course. Take every advantage of this very favourable apparition. Cheers Chris.
    4 points
  24. Don't get into a discussion, just tell them your intention and under legislation your entitled to your refund, any reputable company would and should of offered this when you first notified them you were unhappy with your purchase.
    4 points
  25. Following on from my previous post, here are a couple of cropped versions that, I hope, show off the Pillars of Creation a bit better. Just shows how well the data holds up in my opinion. Again the data was deconvolved in PixInsight with a bit of MLT noise reduction but the leg work done in PS. Here it is in SHO (Note I have updated this to a different version in which I have deliberately left a little green; I know that's not fashionable but I think it adds a little definition): And here is a completely different starless process (which admittedly followed very similar steps
    4 points
  26. My name is Eckhard and I live in Cape Town, South Africa. At the moment I am setting up my rig in the garden whenever weather permits. I am busy planing a roll-off observatory and I hope I will be finished by the end of October. My main interest are the deep sky objects of the Milky Way. I started with Astronomy 30 years ago with a Meade LX200. While I travelled for many years back and forth between Europe and California, my LX200 stayed in California. I had wonderful evenings and mellow nights under the stars. After I moved the telescope to Europe this stopped, the sky in Berlin wa
    3 points
  27. Some decent seeing last night (predicted nicely by the Windy.com app), although transparency was poor with scudding cloud bands which played havoc with the histogram during capture. 16x 120sec captures derotated to 00:45 UTC. Mare Cimmerium at centre with Sinus Gomer (the finger like dark area) nicely visible. 8.75" Fullerscope on EQ6 Altair 224C with Baader L filter and APM 2.7x barlow and ZWO ADC
    3 points
  28. This image started off as something completely different. I was looking at the Tulip Neb to add to Ollys X ray Bow shock image. Some clouds came in and the mount moved, and started re-guiding on another star. It took a 30min O3 sub and I noticed a signal right at the top of the frame. I decided to switch to this image object. It took a few days before I found some other images of it. Turns out it is MWP1 a Planetary nebula. Just below and right of it is another ALV1 planetary. So a nice two for one in this area of Cygnus. This was a nightmare to process due to the amount of star
    3 points
  29. Although my 150 Esprit is one of the earliest, (as I had it for a review and couldnt part with it ) the optics were perfect. I have noticed a "trend" though over the last couple of years for some refractors to have dust between the lenses. One example even arrived with a hair lodged in there! Although it will make no difference to the view, it would be nice to think that there is enough QC process in place to eliminate the issue. The more telescopes that get rejected by the consumer, the more likely some change will occur, but will take some time. Hope you get sorted in the end Rich
    3 points
  30. For reasons unknown to me I have had a few clear nights now with the moon up and about, so I am shooting Ha with the RASA 8 and not getting much sleep. Have done the Tulip and the Propeller nebulae (HaRGB just posted) so last night I aimed at the Lion nebula Sh2-132. Here is 54 x 5 min of exposures at gain 139 with ASI1600MMpro and a Baader fast Ha filter. Looks quite intimate.....
    3 points
  31. Expensive overcoming weak links. I’ve no excuses now just myself
    3 points
  32. You wouldn't want to pick a fight with him. The Dalek looks a bit 'ard as well...
    3 points
  33. Thanks Ian. I can remember that fantastic narrowband image of the Dumbell nebula you did a few years ago with the edge11. And I thought exactly the same Just altered the contrast slightly not sure if it's a improvement?
    3 points
  34. I've bought a William Optics Megrez 90 and more recently a Tak FC100-DL new from retailers and they were both in immaculate conditon both optically and cosmetically. My TMB/LZOS 130 F/9.2 triplet is around a decade old and has had two owners from new. The objective of that is pretty much immaculate as well. If I had bought the scope that @Rich1980 has been supplied with second hand I would have been pretty miffed if the condition of the objective had not been disclosed to me by the seller and taken account of in the pricing. I have bought used scopes with objectives that neede
    3 points
  35. Shining a high intensity light into telescope optics is always a frightening experience. The unnaturally bright light and high contrast always reveals 'something'. Even so, I think the amount of dust/specks revealed in your photo is not acceptable for a new telescope. You are right to contact your supplier and ask for a replacement. You say your supplier checked the telescope before dispatch (I thought we were the only UK retailer doing that) so perhaps, in their defence, the dust/specks are not visible in normal light? Might be a good idea to look at the box address label to see i
    3 points
  36. Nothing like the other incredible images I've looked at here, but I finally got a single image with my old Canon. Been seeing details, but couldn't get them to show on an image.
    3 points
  37. The only downside with the 8-24 zoom, as with the majority of zooms, is that the field of view at the 24mm end is rather narrow - around 44 degrees. It widens to 60+ degrees at the 8mm end though. More minor issues are that the field stop that defines the edge of the field can be fuzzy at certain points in the zoom range and that the eyepiece is not entirely par-focal throughout it's range so it needs a focus adjustment after changing the focal length. The limited field of view at 24mm means that I've found that you really need to complement the zoom with a longer focal length fixed focal
    3 points
  38. Here's my entry to the competition. It's the first time I've processed an image in SHO (so thank you for very much for the data, if anything it has been great to practice on). It took me a few attempts to get something I was happy with and I've finally come up with this. I struggled with the stars on my initial attempts as they were coming out magenta as I have heard is common with SHO, and discovered Starnet++ which was a great help so after initial stretching of the Sii, Ha & Oiii created a starless image for each of the channels before combining into a SHO image. Some further proce
    3 points
  39. My thanks too to FLO for the IKI Observatory project and for making this data available. As others have said, the data is a pleasure to work with and I have really enjoyed processing it. I'm loving the various different versions posted thus far. I've done a number of renditions - pretty much starting from the data stretch each time - and I am posting my favourite six five - three full frame in this post and three two cropped that I will post separately. I hope that they are sufficiently different not to fall foul of the letter or the spirit of the rules. The data was deconvolved in Pi
    3 points
  40. Here's my attempt using PixInsight. Basic SHO combination. Curves to shift the tones towards the Hubble Palette. SCNR to tone back the greens a little and to suppress the magenta stars (inverted image). Ha as Luminance, stretched with HT and stars blended from a Masked Stretched version. HDRMT and LHE to bring out the details in the background and foreground respectively (with suitable masks). Combine Lum with SHO. Image rotated and flipped to give conventional orientation of M16. Cheers Bill
    3 points
  41. My first view of Mars through my telescope from the back garden. There were quite a few wispy clouds about that resulted in shimmering orange mess from time to time. Between those were some nice views through my old second hand c8. After missing about with a few filters, I settled on an orange one. The polar caps were clear, one larger than the other. Some of the larger features were also visible. I must dig out my dew bands next time as things were just beginning to dew up when I finished. I had some nice views of Jupiter and Saturn before this and ended with Venus.
    2 points
  42. I fully agree with John's statements mentioned above. For more than ten years, I'm using the Baader Hyperion Mk III with all my scopes, and, combined with a widefield 25 - 30 mmf eyepiece and a Barlow (in my case, the Zeiss Abbe 2x Barlow), it fulfills all the needs for observing the vast majority of celestial targets. Very sharp, neutral colour, good build quality, reasonable eye relief. Refocusing (only minor adjustments) isn't an issue. For very detailed views, I always rely on good Orthos. Stephan
    2 points
  43. A quick update... Firstly, thank you all for sharing your insight with this. I ended up making the decision to close the gaps in my available focal lengths (expanding on the 21E, 13E, 8E and 6E quartet) and, in particular, have something else to complement the 21E for lower power / wide field views. Below is the updated case which now includes a 30mm XW and a 10mm XW. This will be my main case as it covers focal lengths from 30mm to 3mm. After spending some initial hours with the XW eyepieces, I have found them to be extremely comfortable and very easy to use in terms of ey
    2 points
  44. It might be down to: 1. The low number of purchasers who do not request this test, I cemented my reasons on buying from FLO for this service (I personally think, when spending that much on a 120 or 150 it is a no-brainer). 2. FLO's QA process to ensure customer satisfaction. 3. Logistics - sending some to FLO directly, and some to ES Reid, from the UK distributor, overly complicated, easier to get ES Reid to test all.
    2 points
  45. It runs just the same with XRDP installed....
    2 points
  46. The Sky-Watcher 6" "Dob" includes a Dobson-style alt-azimuth base; no need for any other support. The base is like a turntable, allowing you rotate the Newtonian left and right. The yokes that rise up from the base hold the telescope, and allows you to move the telescope up and down. The left-and-right and up-and-down motions work together, in unison, and in motioning the telescope across the night sky. The alt-azimuth base was made popular by John Dobson several decades ago, although he didn't actually invent it. Rather, I like to think that the Earl of Rosse did... Althoug
    2 points
  47. That mount is an equatorial, which means that it needs to be tilted up a bit on it's Alt axis. Loosen the red arrowed fastener and tilt the whole head up until the little gauge behind the fastener reads 51 (or whatever your latitude is). You then need to place the mount down on the ground so that RA axis (blue arrow) points northwards, towards Polaris. Once that is done you will be able to rotate just the RA axis to keep an obkect in the field of view
    2 points
  48. Without wishing to derail Gina's thread, Rust (along with a few others) is a language I've noted as something to look into at some point. I am a little wary of new languages however. I reckon they take about twenty years to properly "bed in" and become stable enough to be reliably usable. Some newer ones that have quite vocal followings can be an absolute nightmare when you want to run multiple applications, often ending up in "Dependency Hell" when one needs specific versions of certain packages/libraries whilst another requires often conflicting/incompatible versions of the same. Few thi
    2 points
  49. I was quite taken aback when I first imaged Mars with decent 'seeing'. I had actually got surface detail !!! Previously I had recorded diddlerly-squat from the red planet. After seeing a sequenced collection of images somebody had taken on FB showing the rotation, I thought I would give it a go. Celestron Edge 8HD. 5 frames over 1 hour ( Best 7% of 10,000 each). ZWO 224 and Powermate 2x. Since Mars makes a gloriously long sweep across the sky at at a respectable altitude, in theory you could get a good 6 hour sequence. Sean.
    2 points
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