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Showing content with the highest reputation on 04/08/20 in all areas

  1. This shows is 3 hours of activity of the 'finger' prom, captured from around 9am - midday on the 31st. 1000 frames captures every 2 minutes, 50% stacked in AS!3 and sharpened in Registax. Aligned in ImPPG (what sorcery is this?!) then compiled into a video in PS Tal100r PST mod / Altair Hypercam174m / 2.5x Powermate Quite please with how this turned out Prom-30b.mp4
    17 points
  2. I am quite pleased how this turned out as it is only my second attempt at a panorama, and I know I did not really level the tripod that well. Taken last year on holiday in Mozambique in mid-July around 4am local time, this is a 10-pane panorama using an unmodified Canon 70D, 14mm lens (22mm equivalent on the crop sensor) at f/2.8, ISO 3,200 and each exposure was 25 seconds. Three of the galaxies are easy, one a little trickier, and one might need a closer look. The image was stiched using Microsoft ICE and then processed in Lightroom.
    15 points
  3. First proper planetary session with this telescope last night, first sessions were squandered on viewing Neowise , subsequent session ruined by wind turbine turbulence. Off to a poor start last night, despite Jupiter glaring down by 10.30, by the time I got to the observatory a thick haze had formed and Jupiter could barely be seen naked eye. Having made the effort I decided to give it another half hour but it deteriorated to the point where it took the 16" SCT to glimpse the moons. Just at the point where I was about to give up for the night Jupiter started to appear again dimly, no
    11 points
  4. You're not wrong. I have started, and I like what I've managed so far, but for the life of me, I cannot remember how I processed it. If we get enough clear nights with no Moon, then I'll collect more OIII, but I don't think that I'll ever get beyond 4 panels.
    11 points
  5. This has been a long term project for me. I first had a go in 2008, but failed miserably - on many fronts. Filters with halos, no platesolving, and total confusion about the effects of imaging the inside of a shpere all proved far too much. I came back to it in 2018 and gathered some data. Last year I got a bit more. This year, things went very smoothly, so I am putting it to bed for the moment. This is sixteen panels. Most of them are 45m binned 2x2, but the middle ones are about 70m 1x1. Stacking and ddp stretching was done in CCDStack. All other processing was done in A
    10 points
  6. Forgive the hyperbole, it was only 580mph but also 37,000 feet. In late June 19, I took an overnight flight from London Heathrow to Johannesburg in South Africa for a two-week island vacation in Mozambique. I had packed a small telescope and a widefield camera lens to take advantage of the Bortle Class 1 skies on the island, and fortunately had the equipment in the cabin with me. After dinner the cabin lights were dimmed and most passengers it started to drift off to sleep, but not me. I could not resist some stargazing out of the window. At this point we were located somewhere over
    10 points
  7. MWP1 (Motch-Werner-Pakull 1) also known as The Methuselah Nebula is a rarely-imaged faint bi-polar planetary nebula in the constellation of Cygnus. It is one of the largest known planetary nebulae - spanning some 15 light years. It lies around 4,500 light years from Earth. Astrodon Blue: 16x300" Astrodon Green: 16x300" Astrodon Lum: 18x600" Astrodon Red: 16x300" Astrodon Ha: 35x1800s bin 2x2 Astrodon OIII: 37x1800s bin 2x2 Total Integration: 43 hours Captured on my dual rig in Spain. Scopes: APM TMB LZOS 152 Cameras: QSI6120wsg8 Mount: 10Micron GM2000 HPS
    9 points
  8. Fantastic. You did well to control the extraneous light. I did capture the aurora on a plane myself.
    9 points
  9. Posting this just for fun, my very first Jupiter and Saturn images taken with just the top half of the C11! Because of the low altitude of these planets, the bottom half was below the observatory wall! I've just ordered an 8" extension for my Tri-Pier. Looking forward to trying this again with full resolution! Each image best 50 out of 3000 frames, taken with ZWO ASI120-S at 2800mm.
    8 points
  10. Well this was a surprise as I was told I would have to wait until September for it. Came today, but was not expecting such a huge and heavy box. chair stood next to it for size comparison. Also never seen such solid packing before. Also was not expecting such a huge case for a telescope. Well no wonder it was so huge, because it accommodates all the accessories too. So here it is. Not going to be able to use it just yet, as I need to get a Vixen Dovetail and a focal reducer and adapter. It is much bigger and heav
    8 points
  11. Well, she lives!!! Lorna happy I got the scope assembled this evening, all quite straightforward I’m glad to say. I’ve collimated it using a Concenter and a Hotech laser. Seems to be good, but a star test will tell. I also backed the mirror off slightly so it was not gripped by the front clips as tightly. Only thing remaining is to spray the top ring black but I don’t find it too offensive and would rather be using the scope. 1st light report later hopefully, sky looks good so far.
    8 points
  12. I'm persevering and although far from perfect by any means, I feel I'm getting slightly better photos of Jupiter - a lot more recognisable at least. Heritage 150p scope. 8mm EP + 2 x Barlow. Huawei p20. ISO 50. Shutter 1/30
    8 points
  13. Baby mak has arrived. Just a little Bresser MC100/1400 mak. Wanted something smaller and lighter than a 127 mak. Will start a thread on it later.
    7 points
  14. Lunt 60mm DS, Zwo Asi 178mm, 2.5x powermate. Autostackker3, ImPPG and Photoshop CS2 was used to image the solar disk.
    5 points
  15. My spin on this is that you have to 'enjoy' the experience in one form or another. Either ...That means you get a buzz from seeing the reality of the Universe..... from having a beer on the back porch and seeing the ISS ...to teasing out the Jet from M87 data after several nights of collected subs. It all connects you with the bigger picture which is quite life affirming. Or..... you maybe just like to be under the stars ( Ok...the Sun as well for our Solar buddies), with a bit of solitude and that feeling that you are set apart from the full-tilt life style the rest of the
    5 points
  16. Sometimes I think the emphasis on cool down issues can be over exaggerated. The 127 is a small bodied scope and cools quickly. A few years ago a friend brought his 127 Mak round for me to play with. As he lifted the tube assembly out of its foam lined carry case, he told me he hadn't used the scope for about 18 months. I mounted it on a Vixen Porta mount, aimed it at Jupiter which was high in the sky, and was amazed at the immediate sharpness and definition in the image. It performed straight out of the box, so by keeping the scope in a coolish room you'll pretty much guarantee a good view fro
    5 points
  17. First attempt at Mars with the C9.25 and a Powermate 2.5. I think I can process it further but some artifacts are preventing me from that.
    5 points
  18. This is really not easy thing to explain as it involves quite a lot of math an physics, but let me try the simplest possible explanation. It is about perpendicularity. When you have straight line - at each single point light gets diffracted perpendicular to that line. Long straight line just means a lot of light gets diffracted in just one direction - perpendicular to that line. All of that light gets "summed" (because telescope focuses light) so it all ends up in one straight line of light. This is what you see - your stalk produces single line of diffraction. Curved shapes and
    5 points
  19. My pennyworth.....it's horses and courses really. My first scope, mainly for planetary and doubles, was a 102mm f13 (Vixen objective) achro refractor. It still gives excellent views of doubles, but it is only 102mm aperture which limits resolution and of course limiting magnitude - there are many doubles of interest with faint secondaries. It is also long and unwieldy. I then added a 127 Mak, which IMO is a truly excellent scope for the price, and enabled me to get to tighter doubles and fainter secondaries. To get lower, I then bought a 180 Mak which has enough aperture to reach many of
    5 points
  20. Two "90's" in action tonight - 90mm F/11 achromat refractor and 90mm maksutov-cassegrain. Very similar optical performance. Nice views of Saturn and Jupiter Both these scopes together cost less than 100 quid - don't tell the expensive ones that were left indoors tonight
    5 points
  21. Thus is Jupiter and Saturn captured with my skymax 127 using a svbony webcam, 1000 frame ser in sharpcap, then autostackket3, registax and ps, best I've had yet, not as good as most here but steadily improving against my previous attempts. They appear yellow as low down on horizon and full moon that night, will try altering colour levels slightly in ps moro to get more white.
    4 points
  22. The reality is there is a lot more than 5 galaxies in this image. This second image below was quite painstaking to put together as Astrometry.net refused to work on either the Pano or each individual frame. So, iPad in hand, I used Sky Safari 5 Pro to trace out each visible constellation (tricky when thousands of stars are visible), picking out as many DSOs as I could locate as I moved along the image. No doubt I missed one or two, but at final count there were 43 identified. I hope SGL does not compress too much otherwise some of them may vanish from view. If you want a l
    4 points
  23. And a couple more. One with the central Milky Way setting in the west, and another looking east just before sunrise. Both from the same session which started at 2am and went to dawn. I had just tracked the HST across the sky at 80x when I took the second image.
    4 points
  24. My Tak FC-76 under the Carina region of the Milky Way in the very early evening on Benguerra Island in Mozambique last year. Shorts and t-shirt astronomy. I can always get behind that (and those skies!)
    4 points
  25. Managed to get around to processing some of the other data captured 2 August 2020. Depending on your flavour I have produced the images in greyscale and false colour. Images 1 & 2 show AR 2768 Images 3 & 4 show a close-up of the prominence on the south eastern limb. Thank you for checking in. John
    4 points
  26. An old photo of my Tal100r objective showing the very blue hue. I'll hopefully post a better photo shortly along with a few others in the collection.
    4 points
  27. Oh here is the camera balanced very carefully across the ledge and my table.
    4 points
  28. Progress over last 8 weeks. far far from perfect, but better than when I started
    4 points
  29. I stayed out much too late to observe the Red Planet and was not disappointed. I was able to clearly discern Planum Australe (south polar cap); the darker regions Terra Sirenum, Terra Cimmeria, Hesperia Planum, and Tyrrhena Terra; the lighter Elysium Planitia; and a bright albedo region in Hellas Planitia. I was able to get a decent image of Mars at about 39 degrees above my horizon. I used the Orion Starshoot Solar System 5 camera with my 127mm Mak to capture the images, and Registax 6 to process. I included a composite with images of Mars from July and August for comparison.
    4 points
  30. Been after a Megrez 72 for a while and my wish has finally been granted, along with a nice 2” Revelation Astro diagonal and WO Finderscope to complement it.
    4 points
  31. My little Bresser Messier MC100/1400 mak arrived this afternoon. Wanted something smaller and lighter than a 127 Mak. As it will be used mainly for lunar / planetary an F/14 scope will be fine Comes with the usual cheap plastic diagonal and red dot finder which are now in the bottom desk drawer filed out of the way. Build quality seems fine and a quick terrestrial test showed nice sharp optics and the focuser felt nice and smooth and was easy to get pin sharp focus. Fitted SW tube rings and an Astro Essentials 18cm dovetail bar. For a change on a Bresser the finder shoe had th
    3 points
  32. He has the dedication and patience to tune his SCTs through the night - and to travel to locations with excellent seeing that allows his scopes to excel. For us lesser mortals we have refractors
    3 points
  33. This is my 4th DSO after starting in the hobby in June. This attempt is my best to date. More than happy to receive feedback. Process and equipment below: North West UK 1/8/20, 02.30am Bortle 6 skies Equipment: - Canon 800d unmodified - Skywatcher Evostar 80ED - Altair lightwave 0.8x field flattener - Rowan belt modded SW HEQ5-pro Acquisition: - No guiding, no acquisition software, manual polar alignment - Lights: 34 x 90 second exposures (total integration 51 minutes), ISO 800 - Darks: 20 - Bias: 20 - Flats: 2
    3 points
  34. Thanks all and SGL the scope has now been sold
    3 points
  35. Two completely different images of Fleming's Triangle, but which is better? And does the [NII] bring anything to the table? This one was made in 2017 with the 130 apo, 0.75x reducer and Trius 694 with 6 hours in NHO from Bortle 8 Ruislip This was made last month, 130 apo, TS flattener, ASI 1500 12 hours in SHO from Bortle 4 / 3 Dorset. 3 nm Astrodons and 10 min subs in each case This wa processed in AstroArt 5 This
    3 points
  36. A few years ago I went through the same pain that you are having. An observatory doesn't have to be a wonderful all singing and dancing extension to your house. I built a simple wooden box just big enough to house the rig and everything is controlled from within the house. It didn't cost a lot but it absolutely transformed my enjoyment of the hobby. From spotting a gap in the clouds I can be imaging in 5 mins. If it clouds over I am packed up in less than 5 mins. Polar alignment just once a year - and as its an annual occurrence I can take my time and get it bang on. No carrying valu
    3 points
  37. Got to have spares scopes for parts. Only trouble is, these scopes never fail.
    3 points
  38. I'm saying nothing, Peter Apart from I'm glad you have excellent views of the planets with the new scope.
    3 points
  39. I am a happy 150 ED owner as well. Very nice scope and good that it didn’t disappoint Mr D
    3 points
  40. I'm happy to use whichever telescope is giving the best image on the night or object, many a time it's the SCT.
    3 points
  41. "Told You So"! Sorry, but you did prompt me Peter! ☺
    3 points
  42. A few screws - mainly for the vintage scope, a stackable filter cap for the camera and a 0.965 eyepiece that should fill the range nicely
    3 points
  43. Managed to image this with ease last night. I will try for a spectra tonight. Where do we send or post observations/images to?
    3 points
  44. You might find this old thread I started a few years ago helpful? It was a real comparison of two great scopes, either of which would be great on double stars. At F11 and F10 they aren't as narrow a field as some other Maks and the M603 is apochromatic. If you want any further info drop me a pm. Dave
    3 points
  45. Let’s see how this does around Cygnus then!
    3 points
  46. Managed to get out with the 150PL Newt and the 66mm frac to have a slightly more scientific go at Epsilon Lyrae. I estimated the seeing as around Pickering 4/5 (fair to good) so just about ok for this challenge. Jupiter and Saturn were 'boiling' low dowon over the rooftops. Zenithstar 66mm: At x75 the wide pair was split and the harder pair resolved and fleetingly split in moments of stillness. At x90 the harder pair was split most of the time. 150PL: Performance was actually not much better than the small frac, I guess down to the seeing. At x90 the harder pair was split fairly easi
    3 points
  47. Finally got the FS 60 on the mount- what a faff it must be 3 years since I last used it and that was in imaging mode and it was loaned out for last 18 months so the bits and bobs to get it set for visual might have been used elsewhere. Conditions were not ideal bits of whispy clouds & haze and to be honest the scope was a touch awkward to use on the EQ6 as it is on the ext pillar so it is almost a tiptoe stretch the that eye thingy. First up Tak LE50 mm giving x7 to find them - yes it doubles up as a finder scope. So in went the 2.8Tak LE giving x127 and after a coupl
    3 points
  48. Many thanks for the heads up on this Chris. I respotted my dob with the Catseye triangle centre spot and cleaned the primary mirror yesterday. A couple of trips in to get the mirror clips adjusted to removed astigmatism from pinched optics. The work was rewards with some lovely views of the shadow and Europa appearing at the limb. The GRS looked stunning in the moments of good seeing. Saturn was looking particularly good. Put my mind at rest with regards to the dob working as it should following it’s maintenance. Some of the best views of the planets I’ve had this year.
    3 points
  49. And so the Japanese don’t feel left out, the Takahashi 76mm f/7.5
    3 points
  50. Time, practice and learning are more important than kit. Even naked eye astronomy can be massively rewarding if you can learn about what you're looking at. Don't be intimidated by the incredible shots you see on here and elsewhere - as impressive as they are, they're no substitute for losing yourself among the stars of an evening.
    3 points
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