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Showing content with the highest reputation on 08/12/19 in all areas

  1. Hello all, I have finally processed my imaging data from this summer's (August) visit to Southern France; there I joined my trusted imaging companions Frans Kroon and Maurice Toet for a great week. I'd set my sights on a 6 panel mosaic of M31; each panel is exposed for 2 hours, so 12 hours in total using a Luminance filter. Some nights were plagued a bit by high clouds so I had to deal with mild gradients and noise in some panels. My processing skills are also a bit rusty, but I hope I managed to make it look ok. I did not do any major processing on it, mere stretches and curves and stitching the panels together. I always have a preference for b&w as it reminds me of the works of the early astrophotographers (another explanation is; I am lazy and don't like to tweak endlessly behind a computer ) Equipment: Homebuilt 10" f/3.8 Astrograph with Wynne corrector on a Mesu200 mount Sensor: ASI-1600MM-cool cmos -10°C (it was T-shirt weather all night long) Exposure: 6 x 2 hrs (5 min subs for all 6 panels), totaling 12hrs. Filter: Baader Luminance Capture and calibration: Sequence Generator Pro and Astro Pixel Processor. You can find the highest res version on my website, the full size is 68 MP. Full res M31 Thanks for checking it out, Regards, Pieter
    23 points
  2. NGC 4731 is deformed galaxy located approximately 65 million light-years away in Virgo. The shape is possibly related to interaction from the larger elliptical NGC 4967 around a degree away. Apparent magnitude is 11.5. NGC4731 with a size of 6.6x4.2 arc minutes, has been stretched and ripped by a larger neighboring elliptical galaxy, NGC4697. It looks like there is not too much information about this galaxy. IMAGE: Luminance: 30x1200sec Red: 20x1200sec Green: 20x600sec Blue: 20x1200sec Telescope: APO 120mm f/7 Camera: SX694 Flats, Bias and Darks applied Pre-processing and Processing: Pixinsight
    17 points
  3. I believe, as the title states, this is my best capture of the beautiful rosette nebula. The nebula in Monoceros is approximately 5200 light years away The Rosette nebula and the open cluster NGC 2244 are about 130ly in diameter, about 5 times the size of a full moon. I sent this image to my brother who doesn’t really have any interest in astronomy and he replied... ”wow! Is that where god lives!” Although I am pleased with this image, there are a few points that I would like to improve on, mainly the clarity and colour of the stars, they are a bit bloated and were magenta at the end of integration so I ended up just desaturating them. The nebula was low in the sky when I started imaging and there was a wind so I lost a few subs and the sii wasn’t as sharp as I would have liked. it’s 17.5 hours in total, 5.5 hours Sii and Oiii and 6.5 hours Ha, all 30min subs shot over moonless nights with a revelation Astro ed100 f6 doublet with an atik 460ex and astrodon 5nm filters captured with Artemis capture, calibrated and integrated with APP than transferred to ps6 where I basically tried loads of things that I probably couldn’t reproduce in the same order again!! (Need to start keeping notes!) It’s a mixture of SHO with an HSO added in Lum, just a bit. Anyway, thanks for looking I hope you like it. Bryan
    16 points
  4. IC 1871 – Part of the Soul Nebula Description IC 1871 is a very busy region of the Soul Nebula, Sh2-199. The Soul Nebula itself is often referred to as IC 1848 but in fact, this is the designation of a star cluster within the nebulosity. The Soul Nebula is located within the Perseus Arm of the Milky Way in the constellation Cassiopeia at a distance of around 7,500 light years from the Earth with IC 1871 situated on the north-eastern edge of the nebula. IC 1871 is rich is Ha emissions but less so in OIII which makes this region an ‘interesting’ challenge especially for bicolour imaging as displayed here, despite there being other regions within the Soul Nebula where there is a greater density of OIII emissions. If I could afford a 3nm SII filter, I would have used that too but I can’t so I didn’t! The nebula also plays host to some fascinating dust lanes that produce some great additional features to contrast against the bright ridges of glowing gas clouds. Within these gas clouds, large cavities have been sculpted by radiation and winds from the region's most massive stars. The dense star-forming clouds of IC 1871 are an example of ‘triggered star-formation’, a theory that suggests that the compressed edges of the cavities caused by the outwards push of the radiation and wind cause the region to produce successive generations of new stars. Image Stats Mount: Mesu 200 Telescope: Sky-Watcher Esprit 150 Flattener: Sky-Watcher Esprit specific Camera: QSI 683 WSG-8 Filters: Astrodon 3nm Ha, 3nm OIII Subframes: 15 x 1800 sec Ha, 28 x 1800 sec OIII Total Integration: 21.5 hours Control: CCD Commander Capture: MaxIm DL Calibration, Stacking and Deconvolution: PixInsight Post-Processing: PhotoShop PS3 Location Constellation Cassiopeia RA 02° 59' 41.0" DEC +60° 41' 4.0" Distance ~7500ly
    14 points
  5. First light with one of these duo-narrowband filters. I have the IDAS NB1 filter. Captured last week from my street lamp infested back garden. The first night was only meant to be a test but it was clear 2 nights later and I added some more. Gathered 6 hours of data so I had to do something with it. Canon 6D astro modified William Optics GT71 with Flat6AII (spacing still not right) FOV around 6° x 4° at 4" per pixel! Image still heavily cropped due to not aligning the camera angle correctly. 79 x 300s lights at ISO1600 Flats and Bias applied, no darks.
    11 points
  6. WR134 in Cygnus. Low for this time of the year, and was sinking fast, so had to capture over a period of 3 days in my severely LP location. The blue flash was really difficult to extract, in fact the entire image was difficult to process. Definitely one to repeat in dark skies. Ha 20 x 600 Baader 3nm Oiii 8 x 300 + 4 x 900 + 5 x 600 Baader 8.5 nm RGB (for stars) 4 x 150secs binned in all channels. Total 6 hours 20 minutes WOZS71 & Atik460EX + x 0.8 FR HEQ5
    10 points
  7. Been a while since I've been out with my advance setup due to weather and mainly observing when the chance to go out arises. Always wanted to have a go at M31 and this time of year is perfect for it., so here it is: Now, compared to some of the images I've seen recently posted on here of M31, mine pales in comparison. This is due to the setup differences. My one does look rather good on phone screens however Having no tracking capabilities does hinder what you can do. This was taken with around 400ish 2.5 second exposures whilst battling with patchy clouds. (As well as darks and bias too, no flats). Overall though I'm extremely happy with the result, I wasn't expecting as much detail as is present, it probably helps that my camera lens is fairly fast. When the next clear, moonless night comes around I think I will get some more data and see if I can improve it further. Clear Skies.
    6 points
  8. Since I received my little Evostar this summer I've been using it as much as I could almost forgetting my 10" dob at times because of my time limitations at the current moment. The little scope has never disappointed and I've both had the joy of observing Saturn and Jupiter while also taking a couple images with it when the weather would allow for it which it really hasn't the entire november almost. I was excited to try and get my first shot of the nebulosity in the Pleiades and the Running man nebula together with the Orion nebula while still keeping my expectations a little low since I live in a bortle 7-8 area. I hope you enjoy the final results: M45: 27X1min 800ISO, Nikon D3300 M42: 60X1min 800ISO, Nikon D3300 Everything mounted on my star adventure mount that I've started to love even more:) Feedback is of course strongly appreciated! Clear skies! Victor
    4 points
  9. My first attempt at this target. Not the easiest because surrounding trees and buildings really limit the time you can get on target. Furthermore IC 2177 never really clears the light pollution zone from a neighbouring town. All that aside this is 17 x 120s of Ha and 10 x 120s of OIII, calibrated and stacked in APP, processed in PI and Levels applied in PS with a small amount of noise reduction. Taken with a Canon 200mm lens with an ASI1600MM-Pro at gain 139/offset 50, a ZWO-EFW and ZWO-EAF; the whole thing controlled from an ASIair, unguided. Comments and criticism welcome. Thanks for looking. Adrian
    4 points
  10. The final part of my 50th birthday weekend was a couple of nights in a very nice hotel near Rye. On the way back, we stopped at the Observatory Science Centre just to maintain the astro theme, and spent a pleasant few hours looking around the science exhibits which Lorna and I really enjoyed, and then going into the three Domes which were open. Very impressive beasts they were too, makes you appreciate what a counterweight really should look like! Dome B had a 36" Yapp Reflector Dome E had a 26" Thompson Refractor Dome F had a 38" Congo Schmidt Scope Well worth a visit if in the area, and I think I will head back at some point for one of the open evenings when the sky is clear; it was open Saturday night but was about 45 mins from the hotel and the skies were not great, plus the moon was quite bright. Some pics to show a flavour of what it was like.
    4 points
  11. My first attempt at using StarNET to reduce stars. I felt the 'no stars at all' version was a bit 'posterised' so after doing some curves on the nebula I blended the two. Not sure what I think... I'm aware the colour on all images is a blotchy (this was done with a triband filter so colour is challenging). This was just an experiment which would be better used as an L- layer over an RGB. Before: After: Blended:
    4 points
  12. Nice to see the results under these bad conditions, well done. Like vlaiv did (and Carole, just as I was about to press "Submit Reply"), I had a bit of a play with the M45 JPG above and found there's much more hidden in there than originally exposed. Processing the JPG file is not ideal of course as much faint detail is already lost. This is a bit of tweaking in PI and PS.
    4 points
  13. The Vacuum chamber lives!!!! Just did a trial run with a glass of water, and it degasses like crazy. Holds a vacuum too. Pic to follow:
    4 points
  14. Actually that's not the case John. I'm pretty sure I've watched complete transits before during an all nighter. I checked around opposition next year and as an example, Io makes a transit on 8th/9th June 2020, starting at 11.48pm on the 8th and finishing at 2.05am on the 9th, 2 hours 17 mins later so is quite possible to observe. Admittedly the altitude at the start of this example is only 2 degrees at the start but I'm sure there are other more convenient ones, the point being that transits can actually be fairly quick.
    4 points
  15. Hi all, So, we finally got some clear skies tonight and I went out with my XT8 to observe M42. Of course, I knew that the pros always say take time to look at your target, 20-30 mins. Of course,, common sens dictates that they are right. But to be honest, I never looked at anything for longer than 5 mins before moving on, even though I was always aware that I should be patient and that if I was, I would be rewarded. So tonight, when I locked onto M42 with my 10mm BCO and UHC filter (which did actually help, which suprised me), i got a stool and sat and looked and looked..for about 25 mins. And lo and behold, it slowly opened up, revealing amazing structure and I viewed it as never before. I guess my post is to let newbies like me that the rewards for being patient are well worth it! I've seen M42 so many times, but never as "intimately" as I did tonight. Cheers
    3 points
  16. That's really two pictures in one, both stunning. The small one posted here is beautifully balanced and natural whereas the full res is something you explore a bit at a time with wonderful tiny details to discover. Great stuff Pieter. I'd encourage other members to check out your website, too, for unusual targets superbly imaged. Olly
    3 points
  17. Also I have done some stretching with M42. The bright centre is always a problem, but luckily you have not stretched it too much so i managed to cope with it. Carole
    3 points
  18. Those are excellently built mounts. I have the bigger brother (tal2m) and they are as robust as they look. You can always make a slight hack by removing the rear setting circle, allowing the mount to be raised to 90° latitude, making it a super sturdy alt-az mount. Please don't scrap it....
    3 points
  19. Hi. I received this filter on friday. I had serious doubts about the purchase because I intend to use it with my unmodified canon 200d and with my asi1600MM in front of the RGB filters. And I am not sure if this filter will work properly with this set up. I tried it yesterday and it really has surprised me. This is M42, 25 x 45", no flats, no bias and instead of darks I left automatic noise reduction. Almost unprocessed. Only stacked iin DSS, BDE in pixinsight and curves in Photoshop. The most suprising thing is that M42 was close to an 80% illuminated moon. Under these circumstances, I think the result exceeds my expectations. Thanks for looking
    3 points
  20. The annual Geminid Meteor Shower may already be underway. It is expected to peak during the night of 2019 DEC 13-14. Its radiant is in the constellation Gemini. That is the direction toward which the meteor tails point, but the meteors are equally likely to appear anywhere in your sky. The Geminids are debris from the asteroid 3200 Phaethon. The Geminids have been presenting an increasingly intense shower in recent years. At the peak between 120 and 160 meteors per hour may be seen by some sharp-eyed folks. The show begins after Gemini rises in the early evening and intensifies until morning twilight. Although observers south of the tropics will have to wait until midnight. The waning gibbous Moon during the shower’s peak this year may present some interference. Descriptions of the shower or perhaps even lucky photos would be welcome additions to this thread.
    2 points
  21. Managed 6 x 1 minute subs before rain stopped play. C11 with focal reducer. Atik 4120EX OSC processed in PixInsight. Not the best and I know some of you can do better. The tail is there, just needs more time to bring it out. See Inverted Lum.
    2 points
  22. Redid the data from November using some of my new found Photoshop skills. Samyang 135mm and Moravian G2-8300 with Astrodon RGBHa (3nm). 25 x 300s Ha and 12 x 300s each of RGB. Precious little to show in the G and B channels on these nebulae but they are clearly there. Developed RGB and Ha masters in Pixinsight up to the none linear stage and then blending done in Photoshop after removing the stars from the Ha master with Starnet++
    2 points
  23. An update which hopefully will prove useful, I have been in touch with Mike Schuster on the PixInsight forums throughout the day and he pointed me towards his new script MureDenoiseDetectorSettings (which initially was not showing up in PI even though I have the latest version and all of the repository updates and it had even downloaded but for reasons unknown was not visible in PI under MURE, but after adding it in manually it works great). Using two uncalibrated flats and darks it gives the gain and gaussian noise that you need for MURE, no need to divide by 16, they work straight out of the box and provide a very pleasing result. So for the data above, the gain is correct and the Gaussian noise is 27.71DN.
    2 points
  24. hmm, I think you might have a point re something rubbing against the filters - the marks do look like they could be concentric about a point somewhere off to the left of frame. I had a mini-panic a couple of years back after changing filters - I suddenly started getting huge long blooming-like streaks off all the stars, turns out that the ribbon connector from camera to filter wheel (I've got the internal 5-filter version) had become displaced and was fouling against the shutter plane. It could well be that that ribbon cable is still causing issues, rubbing against the filters out of shot as they rotate past. I shall investigate. Hope they're not scratched. I think I can rule out reflections - I shoot in a rural location and can control all the light around me, so no stray light at all, moonless, and those two were taken of different targets at different times of year, so different orientations. Oddly I can't find the same pattern in the flats at all (there's an example flat segment in the first pic above) whatever kind of weird stretch I try to put on them. Can't figure out why it doesn't show in the flats - can the filters have different transmission properties for very dim light over a long period vs relatively bright light for a few seconds ? Maybe a good thing that the flats aren't correcting this, or I'd be none the wiser. I think I got away with it on my CED214 below, but I'm not particularly hopeful for the SH2-206 I'm currently processing - it doesn't seem a very interesting target anyway, at least with my data, and now I've got a damaged channel - maybe I should go Ha monochrome.
    2 points
  25. Really remarkable images (both scaled down version and full size). Hope you don't mind me noticing following, but really that is in my view something that is robbing your work of perfection. If it were not for those small details, I would really consider above images perfection in AP. You are slightly oversampled (at 100% large image does not render stars as pin points, but rather there is softness to them - which means slight oversampling. There is also issue of "fat" diffraction spikes which means atmosphere was not playing ball and there is no detail to justify such resolution). Going with lower sampling rate will improve SNR further - which is great already, this is probably the best rendition of this galaxy that I've seen (not talking about M31, but this little fella): This is first time I've clearly seen bar in this galaxy and how it's twisted. Going with lower pixel scale would give you additional SNR and smoother background while all things would still be visible in the image. Second thing is obviously edge correction of your setup. It is fast newtonian astrograph and sure it's going to suffer some edge softness on larger sensors, but in this case, it sort of hurts mosaic because overlaps can be easily seen, like this: also, not sure what software you used, stitching is not quite perfect - as this part shows: And the third one is obviously blown cores of M31 / M32. I'm aware that I might be considered too harsh with my comments since you produced some splendid images, but I do really think that above things can be easily rectified (add a few filler exposures for the cores, be careful about stitching / blending part and do bin of your data in software) and then you will be closer to perfection in your work.
    2 points
  26. I'm sure that you can pull it out a bit better and also - flat correction will not hurt the image either
    2 points
  27. Building up the suspense nicely Robert Dave
    2 points
  28. I had a go. Just for the future, try to learn to do flats as the dust bunny by the interesting star pattern above shows up. I managed to deal with the Vignetting using gradient exterminator, but again flats would deal with this and it's not always possible to use GE to sort out the vignetting. I also did a crop for a close up. Carole
    2 points
  29. This was quite an image processing-heavy image to be honest as I was rather battling with the OIII Data. However, I essentially produced two colour images, one with fairly garish colours and one with my usual more subtle 'muddy' colours. The garish version used Ha mapped to red and originally, OIII mapped to both green and blue channels but early on in the process, I used Noel Carboni's 'synthesize green from red and blue channels' action to produce different green and blue channels. I used PhotoShop's Hue/Saturation tools to achieve the strong colours I wanted. For the more subtle version, I mapped Ha to red and OIII to both green and blue and processed them again with Hue/Saturation and Selective Color (sic). I also used a strongly stretched mask produced from the OIII data. I then blended the two images together with the garish version at 53% followed by further Hue/Saturation and Selective Color (sic) adjustments to achieve the finished (are they ever finished?) image displayed here. For the fun of it, here are the two images that I blended together before the final Hue/Saturation, Selective Color (sic) and opacity % adjustments were made, together with a copy of the final image to show the progression:-
    2 points
  30. I did a bit of processing on your M45. Some Nebulosity there as Vlaiv says. Longer subs would be better but you would need to be guiding with the SA.
    2 points
  31. Here's my attempt in PixInsight Crop DBE x2 Background neutrlisation Photometric Colour Calibration Split Luminance RGB: Star repair script Masked stretch Further star repair Luminance: Histogram transformation Curves Transformation HDR transformation Curves Transformation LRGB combination LRGB: LRGB combination Star reduction 50 % resampled
    2 points
  32. I may have Takitis but it is not yet in the terminal stage
    2 points
  33. Thank you to everyone who helped with this. I have ordered her the following based upon the advice received https://www.firstlightoptics.com/beginner-telescopes/skywatcher-heritage-130p-flextube.html I am looking forward to learning how to use it with her over the coming years
    2 points
  34. I loaded a fits image, and 6 secs later it hade a solution. I used standard settings in the indi simulator which is configured with my asi camera and skywatcher scope parameters. In all fairness, the target image wasn't very far from the park position of the scope, so that helped. I haven't tested it with my real mount and camera yet, so I don't know how it will perform in the field. Normally the solver won't need to do a blind solve, because it will use the scope position as a start in solving. Anyway, I'm satisfied with this feature.
    2 points
  35. The white cylindrical altitude bearings? Diameter: 20mm Length: 18mm I believe it takes an M6 screw. Over the years I've owned telescopes across the Skyliner range, from 6 to 16 inches and it seems the bearings are all the same size.
    2 points
  36. Something else to look out for with Jupiter are the mutual occultations of it's 4 main moons, which happens approximately every 6 years, when the orbital plane of the four Galilean moons is edge-on with that of the Sun and Earth. This last happened in 2014/15 and will happen again in 2021. Here is a gif animation that the I made from a series of images when inbound Europa was partially occulted by the outbound Io on 26 Feb 2015, together with a still image of almost maximum occultation which occured at 22:21 UT. The gif has an elapsed time of about 75 minutes and starts with Io and it's shadow in transit across Jupiter, then Euorpa appears inbound from the right. They're not my best ever images, but they are fun events to observe and these fairly rare mutual moon occultations only take a few minutes to complete, so you need to be ready for them. Unfortunately the bad news for 2021 is that Jupiter will be very low down and close to the Sun in the dawn skies, however, the good (well better) news is that these mutual events occur over several months, so with a bit of forward planning, perseverance and clear skies, there is a possibility of seeing one or two of them from the UK in the March/April 2021 time frame. Regards, Geof
    2 points
  37. A minor misdemeanor John. I recall announcing an event (either a transit or conjunction) proudly and enthusiastically to the forum, only to be politely informed that when it occurred Jupiter would, infact, be below the horizon at the time! DOH!
    2 points
  38. Must try to crack this one finally. Need to get either the Mewlon or 8" f8 down to our local site away from the houses as I think that is what kills it for me locally. I don't think the number of planes from Heathrow help much either. I managed Zeta Herc recently but only when it was high over head.
    2 points
  39. The data coming from the camera is described as 'linear' because if pixel B recorded twice as much light as pixel A it will look twice as bright in the image. If pixel B is 10x as bright as pixel A it will look 10x as bright. This is fine for daylight photography but doesn't allow astrophotos to present all the information they really contain. The histogram is a graph or map of the brightness distribution in the image. At the initial linear stage it will run in a straight line from dark to bright, like this: The histogram is easier to see in the Levels window: This graph shows all your pixels. Left to right shows dark to light while the vertical axis shows the number distribution of pixels in the image. Not surprisingly we see a huge number of very dark pixels on the left - the background sky - and a very small number of very bright ones on the right, the stars. Unfortunately the bit we are interested in, the galaxy, is not really much brighter than the background sky so doesn't show clearly and it is made up of pixels of similar brightness so we can't see much structure in it. When we 'stretch' the image (which we can do in Levels or Curves) we brighten all the pixels but we brighten the dark ones by much more than we brighten the light ones. this will brighten the galaxy and increase the contrast between its darker and brighter regions. We avoid reversing any pixel values, though, so the image remains honest. Here I've modified the curve: So that's what stretching means. It is the most important single intervention in processing and can be done with an endless variety of added subtleties. Olly
    2 points
  40. As I was inputting the date on the mount last night I noticed it has been many weeks since my last session, way back in October. November here was the wettest on record. So when the sky cleared just before dusk it was too good an opportunity to miss in spite of the 50% moon. With no clear plan I just headed for Triangulum and looked at what I could find on the charts... I used 15s subs throughout although the last two objects would have benefitted from longer subs (but I found field rotation to be a bit of an issue for longer subs in this part of the sky with my alt-az mount). No calibration frames. StarlightLive was the capture engine and Jocular used for everything else. Other details are on the images. I always start with something obvious to check the I haven't made some silly mistake during 2-star alignment and the obvious thing in this constellation is M33. This is a little too large for my sensor but even so a lot of detail in the arms can be captured. The next 'object' is VV 338, an interacting(?) pair consisting of NGC 672 (the brighter of the two) and IC 1727. I observed this for quite a long time as more details were emerging with each sub. The IC galaxy has an interesting structure with several knots lined up along its central part, and a highly-disturbed outer part, resulting in a 'umbrella handle' hook at the top. On the DSS image there are many blue (presumably recent star-forming) regions. This would respond well to colour. Sticking with the VV catalogue of interacting galaxies, here is a field with two such groups, VV 1034 being the group to the upper right with the face-on spiral, and VV 1035 the very close pair below-left of centre. For VV 1034, the face on is NGC 974, type SABb, and to its right is type S0 NGC 969. It is well worth looking at the DSS image for these galaxies as the spiral in particular has a beautiful appearance which I have failed to capture, including some extremely graceful and thin arms. For some reason my charts actually identify the very close pair sitting above these two galaxies as VV 1034 (one of these is NGC 970 while the other has a lesser denomination). VV 1035 is identified as NGC 978 but is clearly a pair of galaxies (listed as E/S0 and S0). There are a few mag 18+ galaxies visible in-between the two VVs Next, a quick look at a galaxy close to the VV groups that appeared to be interestingly flat on the charts and turned out to be so. This is NGC 973. (actual exposure is 9 x 15s = 2m15). This is reminiscent of NGC 891 with its central dust lane cutting the appearance into two. The galaxy below is IC 1815 and has a similar distance of around 240 MLYs, so I wonder if these are also interacting. I can never resist looking at Arps. This is one of two Arps in Triangulum and I have to say it is one of the faintest I've observed, requiring a lot of stacking to pull out its peculiarity. This is actually a close pair of galaxies at 599 MLYs distance where the slightly brighter lower galaxy (mag 16.1) shows little distortion, but on close inspection the upper galaxy (mag 16.4) has its long arms drawn out by the interaction. Unlike the other images here (where N is up), I've rotated this to show the appearance as a back-to-front question mark. Again, this is very clear on the DSS image, and in fact the arms are blue along their entire length, something worth returning to on a moon-free night with colour I think. I ended the chilly and relatively brief session seeking out a very distant object for a non-astronomical friend with whom I'd been chatting about distance scales in the universe. This is an unspectacular but nevertheless compelling object: a z > 4.5 quasar, corresponding to a distance of between 10 and 12.5 billion light years depending on the adopted model. It is listed as V mag 18.8 (which looks about right) but I had a hard time at first with this one (and I'd barely count it as an identification but it does just about rise above the noise floor) hence the longish stack. I guess some calibration would have helped...The more precise coordinates are 1h 34 21.6, +33° 7 55.9. Thanks for looking! Martin
    1 point
  41. For sure, definitely click on the full size image link and have a good look around. Beautiful image.
    1 point
  42. Dynamic Background Equalisation: a tool in Pixinsight to remove gradients in the image. The shadow of dust near the camera sensor. This will cause a dark area in the image. Only flats will help even these out. "no can do". I toned it down as much as possible. It's just below the bright stars above the galaxy. I can post an image where it's still visible.
    1 point
  43. Thank you very much! And yes, I live in the middle of Denmark's largest city so when I'm out imaging I always stay outside with my kit the entire time which means I'm sometimes limited by the temperatures outside;)
    1 point
  44. Thanks for your kind words Alan, I am happy with the image, it’s probably is my best to date, I just know there is some loss in definition in the stars in NGC2244, and the stars have no colour, but it was time well spent. Cheers Bryan
    1 point
  45. Hi Radek, The problem with LibRaw is the API interface change continually, so a program compiled with one version do not work on another system with another version of LibRaw. My interface library with LibRaw is in this case. For Ubuntu I have setup a PPA at https://launchpad.net/~pch/+archive/ubuntu/ppa-skychart but this is not compatible with Raspbian, this is why you need to compile this library. The instruction in the readme must now work without problem, but tell me if you think something need clarification: https://github.com/pchev/libpasastro/blob/master/README.md Patrick
    1 point
  46. Hi @Alkassim and welcome to SGL. What 'scope/OTA do you own ? I think the best method maybe to somehow make some kind of manual tracking mount. I have seen a few youtube videos of some SCT's manually tracking, with some success tracking the ISS/Zarya. Other satellites will be to small to decern any features, other than a point of light. I get a buzz when I see one whizz across my eyepiece field of view and find it very relaxing on an english summer evening, laying down and tracking them with a pair of binoculars; watching the brightness increase/decrease as it tracks across the night sky.
    1 point
  47. Hi Reggie, congratulations on the observation of Sirius B. One day I hope to spot it myself. Fortunately there's a few good years for Sirius B coming up. I'll need them: even Sirius A is elusive here.
    1 point
  48. Keep plugging away, it is going be well worth it.
    1 point
  49. The US legal system has the concept of punitive damages which isn't (generally) the case in the UK. So you can make a claim for way more than your actual losses and the court (or jury) can award them as a discouragement to others thinking of trying something similar. They generally get whittled down through a series of appeals after they are awarded, so initial claims tend to shoot for the Moon not expecting to get anything close to what is being claimed. Question is whether anti-trust regulators will decide to take a look at this whole mess and dish out fines or other sanctions. May be they'll consider the market to small-fry to bother with, but either way it is us consumers who suffer when companies behave like this.
    1 point
  50. Hi. yes. Note, there's an elastic band to hold it in place. These design types seem to have made the diameter of the cap stretch to the size of an average human head, with little regard for preventing light entering the mirror cell of a 130pds. Ridiculous.
    1 point
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