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Showing content with the highest reputation on 18/02/19 in all areas

  1. TS130 f6.6 G3-16300 Riccardi APO Reducer und Korrektor 0,75x SkyEye Observatory 70x300 L 40x300 R 40x300 G 40x300 B
    18 points
  2. Leo Triplet (M65, M66, and NGC 3628), The Leo Triplet is a small group of galaxies about 35 million light-years away in the constellation Leo. large version at astrobin https://www.astrobin.com/391520/ Date: 4th January and 2nd February 2019 Mount: Skywatcher EQ6-R Pro Telescope: Orion 10" f/3.9 Newtonian Astrograph Camera: Nikon D5300 self modded full spectrum Total exposure: ~3 hours Subs : 300sx36, Flats, Bias, Darks ISO: 400 Guide Scope: Orion 50mm Guide Cam: ASI120MM Filter: Optolong UV/IR cut Corrector: Baader MPCC Mark III Coma Corrector Capturing
    18 points
  3. Another image of these lovely galaxies, this time from Berkshire. Taken between 15th Jan and 4 Feb, 6 hours of Lum and 2.5 hrs each of RGB, Esprit 150, SX-46 and Mesu200, processed in Pixinsight and Photoshop. Thanks for looking Dave
    15 points
  4. Well its almost here and in the final stages of assy, can't wait to try it out.
    12 points
  5. Captured with Firecapture Processed Autostakkert, ICE and Photoshop Wish I could move the slight "steps" around the top of the limb at the 11 - 1 o'clock positions. Appreciate any advice how to do that.
    10 points
  6. Dear all, yesterday evening, I set up my 5" MAK on the terrace and had a look at the lunar terminator. A cone shedding some light to a dark and large crater attracted me. After doing the sketch, enjoyed looking up the craters in my lunar atlas books and in the "Geologic History of the Moon" (Don E. Wilhelms) to learn a bit about what I have sketched. Grimaldi: With a quick check in the maps it turned out to be basin Grimaldi. Named after an Italian physicist and with a diameter of around 170-170 km, this pre-Nectarian basin filled with dark lava (Eratosthenian age) is dominating
    9 points
  7. Although not quite finished, my new observatory is more or less operational, so thought I ought to try it out. This is the first lunar image I've taken (through a scope) for several years. I'd almost forgotten how much I love the Moon! Final image is a stack of 11 shots taken through my Esprit 100 at prime focus, using a Nikon D300 to capture the photons. Stacked in AutoStakkert (first time I've used this software, and seems pretty good), with very minor wavelet processing in Registax 6 (don't really know what I'm doing with wavelets, so just fiddle until I'm happy), then final tweaking i
    9 points
  8. Here is my latest effort to image my favourite class of DSOs. M106 and other galaxies in the nearby FOV. Taken over 3 nights with some high cloud and the moon intruding on the third set. Total integration time 5.9 hrs which is a personal best. Calibrated and stacked in APP, I couldn't get StarTools to load the separate channels, so I combined them in APP and loaded this file into ST for further processing. I have spent quite a few hours in the elusive quest for more detail/less noise, this is about as good as I can make it, I think. There was an annoying flare on the first night's data wh
    8 points
  9. The completed two pane mosaic of this often imaged galactic pair. The combination of the TEC140 and QSI690 has enabled such fine detail to be teased out with a very rewarding result that has taken two day's worth of processing in total, circa 16 hours of concentration. I finished last night at midnight and have aching eyes this morning, then some much needed objective feedback from my imaging partner Steve Milne gave me the boost to complete the final tweaks and balancing of brightness, colour, and depth between the two panes. Thanks Steve. Hints of IFN swirl around the pair and I have en
    8 points
  10. An LRGB image of M15 that I captured on 31st August last year using my 6" refractor and mono CCD at 0.69arc-sec/pixel. Similar process to those of M3 and M13 that I captured earlier in May, just multiple 30s subs, so 26mins L and 20mins each of RGB. CS, Andy
    8 points
  11. Last time I did this target was back in 2016.Also called the Whirling Dervish, and if you look close at the main feature you can see why. Always a challenge to get images from Bromley but at least this one is doable, but it was a first quarter Moon being the image I got on Valentine's night and stayed up most of the night to do it, and had the dome on the Pod Zenith Table as it was near the Zenith.Ha 20 x 600Ha 4 x 900Oiii 12 x 300 binned x 2Sii 12 x 300 binned x 2Also took RGB for the stars, but not managed to superimpose them successfully so have left them out.Atik460EX, SW130PDS and HEQ5 +
    6 points
  12. This mount atop a Manfrotto 3051 seems a perfect match for the FC-100DC, and smaller scopes can be used without issue. My 120ED doublet was too much for vibration-free views.
    6 points
  13. I made a 16" one and motorised it with Stellarcat motors and ArgoNavis. I use a wifi dongle to control it with Skysafary on my phone.
    6 points
  14. Yes, I meant something like this, about 2.5 hours with my newton 150p and ASI120MM+Primalucelab RGB filters: Each frame was processed with AutoStakkert2! , but then individual images had to be composed to show the motion. An AZ would hve made it more complicated due to field rotation, I guess, but maybe it can be dealt with too... I just don't know Fabio
    6 points
  15. Poor seeing plus wind etc today, best I could do, took some proms but having trouble getting them to stack without artefacts. Dave
    5 points
  16. Hi everyone No laughing out loud please; a nearby gibbous moon and a faint reflection nebula. I started optimistically at 3 minutes and nearly fried the sensor. So here we are in 40 exposures of 60s. It is there I think. You just need to use a little imagination! Thanks for looking and here's looking forward to the next 5-minute+ nights because I think that's what this is gonna need... tair3s on canon 700d: 40 minutes @ ISO800
    5 points
  17. Photo taken in non-ideal conditions, only to take advantage of a gap between clouds. As it was done on a clear day, it lost a lot in resolution and contrast. We can easily see how Jupiter's appearance is different from one year to the next, especially the equatorial zone has completely changed. https://www.astrobin.com/391379/
    5 points
  18. stolen through some gaps in the permacloud. seeing was fazey but fair. and a birdie transit as well. kit Old Faithfull, 1200d taken from obsyroom open window cos im lazy or old or both ?? wishing you all clear. thanks for looking. charl. wide. closer. birdy transit. well i think its a bird or a very large bat.
    5 points
  19. I thought id have a crack at the Rosette nebula to test out my new IDAS NB1 filter and I'm very pleased with the result. First thing you'll will notice with the filter is that due to the higher cut off point and different wavelengths the histogram saturates pretty quickly under a near full moon. The large majority of this is Halpha but its very pleasing to obtain anything under a bright moon especially a part colour image. At this point id say its one of my best astro purchases! 51X2.5min under the moon
    5 points
  20. I have had a great week of observing the moon. The binoviewer in the FC100DC with barlow and 18mm Celestron Ultima's or 16.8mm ortho's give stunningly impressive views, despite the fast moving cloud on a couple of nights. When I removed the binoviewer and fit the 2mm HR, the view at 370X was sharp and detailed, and very comfortable. The HR is a joy to use for lunar observing! This is going to be a great eyepiece for Mars when its 5 or 6 arc seconds!!
    5 points
  21. I observed the moon a couple of days ago with the TSA120/2.4mm HR and at .32mm exit pupil the image was superb. With binos the low power views were stunning as well up to about 250x. The HR's unleash the power of this telescope...
    5 points
  22. I've really been wanting some binos to help my poor old eyes to find faint objects easier. Found a used set on Amazon.
    5 points
  23. https://astrob.in/391497/0/ Had some subs from weeks before which was not enough for any details. Almost full moon last night figure it's been too long with too many cloud so what the heck. Added another 64 subs under 80% plus moon and wasn't so bad. Maybe I shouldn't be so afraid of the moon.
    5 points
  24. Just a ten second exposure with a Fuji XT2 with XF16mm lens wide open. Want to get more into this very wide field malarkey. Just need more clear skies...
    4 points
  25. About a week ago I gathered 3 hours of lum data with my Esprit 100 and ASI1600MMpro (89 x 2 min @ gain 139, offset 50, -20°C) to add to 3 hours of RGB data collected simultaneously with the Esprit 150 and ASI071MC. I posted the result previously: Now when I stretch the lum data I see something that could be IFN and wonder if anyone else have looked for IFN around these galaxies and if it would be worth while getting more data to bring it out better - I stretched the hell out of the current data so it is in no way a pretty image. I do not see any IFN in the RGB data collected with t
    4 points
  26. I definitely have floaters and the 2mm highlights them nicely, but I can kind of limit their influence by positioning the eyepiece horizontally and rolling my eye occasionally to get them to move. I remember a time when I had no floaters at all, or at least I can't remember seeing them in my early astro days.
    4 points
  27. You might be interested in this extract from a note I made in early January when I was evaluating the new Burgess Supermono that was reviewed recently by Bill Paolini. The scope was a TEC 140. ‘We had a rare clear night here in Surrey UK yesterday and I spent more time with the eyepiece (the Supermono) and a couple of others. Observing the Trapezium, nicely focused and centred in the TEC 140 at x98, the F and E stars pinged decisively into view. The most striking aspect was the relatively bright transmission rather than the precision of the view. Changing to a 9mm Tak Abbe ortho, x109,
    4 points
  28. Hi did not use a rsj but had some box section and used that works just fine Harry
    4 points
  29. Dear all, the sunny weather today once again lead to a H alpha sketch of the solar disc. This time I once again did it with natural charcoal on mould-made paper: Telescope: Lunt LS 50 THa B600 PT Eyepiece: Celestron X-cel 10mm Date & Time: February 18th, 2019 / 1200-1230 CET Location: home terrace, Dusseldorf region, Germany Technique: natural charcoal on white Hahnemühle Ingres mould-made pastel paper Size: 24x31cm Clear and sunny skies! Achim
    4 points
  30. I let the dog out in the garden before bedtime last night only to be confronted by the most stunning Moon Halo. I couldn't resist getting my camera... I then wondered, what is going on here? Good old Wikipedia has the following to say about it: "A 22° halo is an optical phenomenon that belongs to the family of ice crystal halos, in the form of a ring with a radius of approximately 22° around the Sun or Moon. When visible around the moon, it is called a moon ring or winter halo. It forms as the sun- or moonlight is refracted in millions of hexagonal ice crystals suspended
    4 points
  31. Grabbed a test image of M42 after the double cluster. Its just 18min per channel as it was in the process of disappearing behind the fence...lol 6x180s (R,G,B)
    4 points
  32. I think Valentine's Day must have gone to my head and I have let the splendid abundant colour of this icon image shine through. I have tamer versions but I thought, what the heck. I wish I had the weather in south Devon to have captured this but have had very few clear nights since October 2018, so I am doubly pleased to have made the investment (time, effort as well as £) at e-Eye. Details: Tak FS106 at F5 10 Micron GM1000HPS QSI683wsg-8 with Astrodon filters 26 hours integration - Ha 24 x 1200s; Lum 36 x 600s; RGB 24 x 600s each channel e-Eye, Spain
    3 points
  33. First light with the Altair Astro GPCAM3 290c. Explore Scientific ED80 APO Triplet Skywatcher AZ-GTi WiFi 14/02/19 Waxing Gibbous mineral moon at 67%. 3 pane mosaic, 50% of 1000 frames per pane, stacked in Autostakkert, stitched in MS Ice, wavelets in Registax.
    3 points
  34. Cloudless nights has been sparse the last 6 months since I got my new ZWO ASI 183MM-PRO. Probably just the prophecy holding true! But I just had two nights last week where I could get some hours in during the moonless part of the night. Unfortunately my rig had some issues on the first one, so only got like 40 minutes in, but then almost 4 hours the next night. Unfortunately I had to go to work the next day, so had to pull the plug early.. ______________________________ Gear: Skywatcher 150PDS Celestron Advanced VX Mount ZWO ASI 183MM-PRO Baader 2'' Neodymium Filter Expl
    3 points
  35. Nowadays there seems to be a growing community who believe that you're not "doing it right" unless you use PI. I'm not going to try to convince anyone that Photoshop is the best option - for some it clearly isn't, but it's exceptionally good at what it does. That does not mean that any of the other packages are not also very good. In the hands of a skilled processor I'd guess that decent data could be turned into an outstanding image in any of the packages on offer. With a much less skilled operator (such as myself) it's going to be a struggle no matter which package is used.
    3 points
  36. Hello Thought i would post this image of M109 taken yesterday . 60x1min Luminance subs 30x1min Red subs then the clouds came in Gain was 194 according to APT which seems to always chose this level Taken with my new ZWO 183MM pro camera which replaced my 450D I don't think this galaxy gets much attention ? Scope was SW ED72 with field flattener and guided Its not great but still I'm still learning . I'm struggling to get any colour as yet M51 was taken a week ago same exposure regime but the computer played up so colour subs were spoiled If anybody
    3 points
  37. Mine look like that what's the problem? Alexandra
    3 points
  38. Hello all, I just wanted to share something that I recently found out and it has worked for me like a treat! I have a Sky-Watcher 72ED and the Field Flattener for it. I had to purchase a "special" adapter ring for my DSLR which is actually a Canon Bayonet adapter but instead of a standard T2 threads, it comes with M48 (2") threads so it will fit to the Field Flattener's M48 thread. I have a fully screwed imaging train which makes it challenging for framing objects properly. I was thinking of having a manual rotator in the setup so I can rotate the camera and properly
    3 points
  39. I'm of the opinion that when we started to "get serious" about CCD astro-imaging PS was about the only game in town. It built up a reputation based on the early successes and was adopted by the amateurs as being the "package of choice". you weren't "doing it right" unless you used PS and/or some of the add-ons developed by the astronomy community. It was never a dedicated astro package - it was for use by serious photographers and professionals. As the years went buy it changed both in content and complexity to better meet the market needs of the professional. Most of the needs of t
    3 points
  40. Hi everyone, This waxing gibbous moon was shot on Valentine's Day in LRGB. 1 minute per channel using an ASI1600MM-Pro. 20% of frames kept and stacked meaning about 1500 in total. Thanks for looking!
    3 points
  41. David, I've had both of these and still have the AZ4. Whatever the spec says, the AZ4 is FAR more steady and will take a heavier load. The azimuth slow motion on the AZ5 comes out at such a strange angle from the mount that you will never be able to reach it if you have anything but a short scope - or you have very long arms! True, the AZ4 doesn't have slow motions, but it is smoother to push around, or at least mine is. The AZ5 is prettier, but then looks aren't everything .
    3 points
  42. Monday night it finally cleared and 2 am - 5 am on Tuesday morning I had my two Esprits directed at these two Messier galaxies. I collected the RGB with the ASI071MC (OSC) sitting on the Esprit 150 (38 x 5 min at gain 200 offset 30) and the Lum with the ASI1600MM (89 x 2 min at gain 139 offset 50) sitting on the Esprit 100. Ideally I should have collected the Lum with the larger scope but both galaxies would not have fit on the smaller chip of the ASI1600. Still, the lum collected by the smaller scope helped a lot. Stacking, aligning and a few other minor things in PI, the rest processed
    3 points
  43. Hi. Imaged this edge on Galaxy in Leo a couple of nights ago.Had to contend with strong Moonlight,so tried to find a target well to the East and rising. Settled on NGC3628. This is one of the Galaxies that make the famous Trio in Leo. This is an LRGB image of 4hrs in Luminance,and 2hrs each in RGB. As the L and the RGB were captured with different cameras,some cropping was unavoidable. Usual scope and cameras were used. Calibrated with darks/flats and bias. Mick.
    3 points
  44. A quick image after a fabulous observing session this evening with exceptional seeing, 40 frames of 100 stacked. Kit - Skymax 102, Nikon D3200 Process - Pipp>AS!3>IMPPG
    2 points
  45. Box section as shown by Harry and Davy-T would be a better bet. Just to clear any misunderstanding regarding the "Todmorden" mount, the sections are connected via lengths of steel studding, the mortar is just for bedding. I use 2p pieces to provide three point of contact on mine. ?
    2 points
  46. Yes I used one many years ago for the 4" F13 frac I had at the time with the home made EQ mount. Very solid it was. Mine was great value as I scrouged it from work at the time (worked for Budge at the time) and we had demolished something and it was going for scrap.?? I still have the EQ in the garage.
    2 points
  47. This is why it took a 30" for me to see it around 40 years ago. Right now, a much smaller telescope can be successful, good seeing and tight star images are the key. ?
    2 points
  48. Shane (Moonshane) and I tried adding occulting bars to ortho eyepieces to see the Pup star a few years back. It's worth a try but I can't recall that it worked for us back then. One issue is that the occulting edge itself seems to cause some additional diffraction which does not help with spotting the tiny gleam of the Pup star shining through the diffraction that surrounds Sirius A.
    2 points
  49. I've returned to this area again and again over the years but looking back I think this is the most detail I've ever managed. Taken last Thursday through a C9.25 sct with x2 barlow. Processed in registax and tweaked in photoshop. We've had a good run of clear nights this lunation !
    2 points
  50. 5.05 - 5.50pm, Sunday - Moon nearly full, lowish in east, between houses, so I grabbed the chance to view more treats on the terminator, using the ED80 Apo. (It's been all Moon lately, as it goes cloudy after dark.) Mags - x40, 80, 120. Craters west of Mare Humorum close to the terminator led to Byrgius with its floor in shadow and a notch out of its western rim, right on the terminator. Immediately north was a region of overlapping craters, resembling a foot (same size as Byrgius) with two big toes. East of that, a group of three tiny craterlets, then the little de Vico. Continuing
    2 points
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