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Showing content with the highest reputation on 11/05/18 in all areas

  1. Hey, guys, In april NGC 5033 was one of my targets. Interesting astronomical detail that the Seyfert nucleus of this galaxy is not in the kinematic center of the galaxy (the point around which the stars rotate). This has been interpreted as evidence that this galaxy has undergone a fusion. The displacement of the Seyfert core from the kinematic center can destabilize the rotation of the gas at the center of the galaxy, causing gas to fall into the core. This unbalance might explain the distortions in the spiral arms. I processed the galaxy inner core without luminance, purely from the RGB data. This made it sharper and more detailed. Here is my version, 13 hours LRGB. I hope you like the picture. https://www.astrobin.com/343052/0 http://www.spaceimages.de/en/astrophotos/galaxies/ngc-5033 Jens
    13 points
  2. May, 07-2018; 06:46 TU C14 HD + ASI 290 + L filter Stacked 200 frames by Avani Soares Parsec Observatory
    10 points
  3. In order to maximize my imaging time during clear skies, I've recently started to capture bright star clusters when the moon is too bright for any other deep space object. My latest LRGB attempt is below, the globular cluster M92. Apart from the inevitable light pollution gradients, removed during post processing, the effects of the moon light pollution appear to be minimal. The image was taken with my Esprit 150 and represents about 3.6 hours integration time. Alan LIGHTS: L:11,R:10. G:11, B:11 x 300s, DARKS:30, FLATS:40, BIAS:100 all at -20C.
    10 points
  4. Hi everyone. I made use of the good weather we had last weekend to get back into imaging, first proper outing since February! I choose NGC7023 as it's a nice easy target for beginners lol! Taken from my street light cursed back garden over 2 nights: 64 x 180s at ISO800, Canon 600D on 200p F5 Dithered plus 10 darks each night 30 bias and flats for each night Pre and post processed in Pixinsight. I think this one would benefit from a darker site and more integration. It may seem a bit black clipped but if I lift it more it starts to introduce blue/black mottling and light pollution. Even heavily stretched after stacking there isn't much detail in the outer dust field, but it's definitely starting to appear but just falls short due to the low exposures. Overall, I'm happy with my limited processing experience. I will definitely visit this again in the future. It's been a positive project overall. The AZ-EQ6 performed flawlessly, guiding was good, platesolving was effortless and I've sorted out my flats. Need to use A/V mode and an exposure value of +2. This shows the histogram on APT all the way over to the right. But if I open a flat in the free Iris software, it gives a peak ADU value of just under 7k whereas a fully saturated flat (15 seconds of flat panel at max brightness) gives a peak value of 15.3k. I can also now confirm that my coma corrector needs the spacing sorted as the stars in the top right corner still have coma. I was unsure initially if guiding was an issue but i dont think it is. I have also found a nice quiet darker location to image from. Not a dark site but maybe bortle 5 and more importantly away from streetlights! Clear skies everyone!
    8 points
  5. This image was captured with 6 hours of data from Tablemountain near Ellensburg, WA and Goldendale WA. Details are as follows. Atik 383L+ Camera and TMB130ss refractor on an Atlas EQ6. Captured with Sequence Generator Pro and processed with Pixinsight 1.8.05 L: 21x10mins = 3.5 Hours binned 1x1 Ha: 6x10 mins= 1.0 hr binned 1x1 R: 6x5mins= 30 mins binned 2x2 G: 6x5mins= 30 mins binned 2x2 B: 6x5mins= 30 mins binned 2x2 Thanks for looking. Ajay
    7 points
  6. But this time in London... After the excitement of the lovely dark skies in the Isle of Wight, I was brought back to Earth with a bump a few nights ago when the viewing in my back garden was truly horrible by comparison. It does seem to happen like this, where I get spoilt by a great session in dark skies and then wonder why I bother observing in London. However, forecast looked good for tonight and I really wanted to have another crack at the eagle and swan in London as the weekend was my first time of seeing these lovely objects. So I got up at 3am for a quick look. I went very low mag for this session with my night vision, only 1x and 3x (using my afocal magnifier which vignettes very significantly as you can see from the photos below). But I was really pleasantly surprised tonight and have got my London astro mojo back ? I started with the North America nebula and Gamma Cygni. Although not as bright and clear as in the iow, these objects were both quite high in the sky at 3am and this clearly made a big difference compared to a few days ago. Lots of detail available in the eyepiece and at 3x despite the vignetting the views were really good. ? Then onto Sagittarius to finish off the quick look. With the 1x I actually got all 4 (actually 5 with Sharpless 54) of eagle, swan, triffid and lagoon (lagoon just peeped over the rooftops at about 14 degrees high) in the same fov. All bright and obvious but given the low mag they just really looked like fuzzy patches. Finalky I popped in the 3x and got some more defined views of the eagle and swan. The lagoon and triffid had disappeared behind a tree by this stage disappointingly. The views had started deteriorating and I could see the sky brightening with the sun approaching, so packed up. But a nice little session and I’ve got a smile on my face as I head back to bed for a couple of hours...
    7 points
  7. From my other report you will be aware that I have been observing with an Astronomy Club based in North California. Yesterday morning a club member sent me an email wanting to know whether I would go to the dark site again to try and observe Omega Centauri. He kindly picked me up and drove up the mountain road to the observing site. The site has a 17.5 inch Newtonian based on a Eq mount which is solar powered. Ross had his Celestron 9.25 SCT and I simply took some Celestron 12x70 Binos. The sky in Livermore had been crystal clear all day and this continued throughout the night. You cannot imagine the quality and transparency of the sky and this mountain location. Ross and I had agreed on a number of objects to observe but NGC 5128 (Centaurus A) and NGC 5139 (Omega Centauri) were the prime targets. This is the observing list - NGC 2371 and 2372, NGC 2392, M68, M83, NGC 3115, NGC 3242, M67, M95, M96, M105, NGC 3384,NGC 3607, NGC 3608, M13 with NGC 6207, M12, M10, M14, M4, M80 and M9. Finally the big event. I could see the main stars of Centaurus with the naked eye. I panned for Omega Centauri with the binos and there it was - big and beautiful. We then viewed it with the 9.25 SCT and the big Newt. You cannot imagine the size and brightness of this GC. A sight I will never forget. With the Newt I then search for Centaurus A and again a great view in these crystal claer skies. I ended the night viewing the Antennae galaxies again with the 17.5 inch scope. So there it is after many yaers of waiting I have seen this fabulous DSO. I will always be grateful to Ross and the support from TVS Astronomy Club to allow me on to their private site to use their equipment. I attach a few photos.
    7 points
  8. Rupes Recta and Rima Birt May 07-2018; 06:28 TU C14 HD + ASI 290 + L filter Stacking of 175 frames out of a total of 2000 by Avani Soares Parsec Observatory
    6 points
  9. very cloudy here today but a few gaps, seeing isnt its best but nothing a frame cull wouldn't sort out. theres some nice proms on show, a nice one on the oncoming limb with some fly away bits. hope you all have clear to view. clear skys. thanks for looking. charl. prom oncoming limb upper. prom oncoming limb mid. prom off going limb upper. prom off going limb lower. AR2709
    6 points
  10. M81 & M82 taken in april from Bortle sky scale 8. HaLRGB composition with 9.8 hours integration time in total. I tried to capture the starburst in M82 with 2.5 hours of H-alpha, but the results were rather disappointing in that respect. I realised that I need to triple the integration time in Ha to be able to get it, but the dark season is now over in Stockholm. IFN showed some hints but I decided not to go after it due to the weak signal. While processing the image, I came to an interesting conclusion, namely, that it isn't always wise to go after details if the the whole image aesthetics doesn't support it! Better to give the image a dynamic ghostly feeling than destructive sharp details. After all, it was a joy to process and to overcome each obstacle in the complex processing of HaLRGB composition. Finely, a long session with Wim, the Pixinsight guru had a great impact on improving star colour amongst other improvements. Thank you Wim! This is for you! Acquisition details here; https://www.astrobin.com/346017/ Thanks!
    6 points
  11. A delightful spring-time galactic pair and the first time I've imaged these galaxies. The recent clear and sunny weather has brought some good evenings for imaging and I can see that this target has attracted many others with its beautiful colouring and active central core regions which show characteristic red supernovae remnants. The image is rotated 90 degrees so the whale can swim serenly by . Details: WO 132FLT at F7 10 Micron GM1000HPS QSI683 with Astrodon filters Lum 18 x 600s; 15 x 600s RGB each; 12 x 600s Ha; total integration 12.5hrs SGP for capture & PI for processing Home Obs, Totnes Thanks for looking!
    6 points
  12. Observing session after midnight on Friday the 11th of May 2018. Mainly just browsing around. Easy (obvious) doubles, open clusters. No really challenging stuff, so perhaps something for everyone here. A few sources mention some well-known regions as open clusters; I gave them a go to see whether that knowledge enhanced my observing experience. It didn't, but they are nice bits of sky all the same. So don't mistake my 'ho-hum' comments for lack of enjoyment. 6" f/6 newtonian on manual alt-az mount with slow-motion control. Clear, but not wonderful. Terrible LP at this location. Lyra A nice, tight region to scan at leisure. Putting some names to faces: ** Epsilon Lyrae (Double Double) - 5mm eyepiece for very clear split ** HD 178849 - 24mm EP ** HR 7272 - 24mm EP OC NGC 6791 - 24mm EP. Not much there to be seen, perhaps due to +9.50 magnitude. ** Zeta Lyrae - 24mm EP OC Stephenson 1 - 24mm EP. Apparently, the region around Delta Lyrae is an open cluster. Nice view. OC Iskudarian 1 - 24mm EP. The region between / south of Delta and Zeta. Hm. Might as well call the whole constellation an open cluster. PN Messier 57 - 24mm EP. The Ring Nebula. Used 13mm and 7mm to make it stand out a bit more. AV helps. ** Beta Lyrae - 24mm EP. ** HR 7140 - 24mm EP. Can't see the actual companion, but it's a nice pseudo-pair with HD 175634 C with attractive colour contrast gold and blue. Cygnus Easy to get lost here, with so much going on that many named targets are difficult to isolate. I most often end up just scrolling around in wonder. Tonight, for once, a focused effort to pin stuff down. OC NGC 6910 - 24mm EP. Also known as the Rocking Horse Cluster; a personal favourite. OC Collinder 419 - 24mm EP. Not much to it. ** RS Cygni - 24mm EP. Cool! OC NGC 6871 - 24mm EP. Gave it some time, and it began to grow a personality. Will return. OC Biurakan 2 - 24mm EP. Wouldn't seek it out for its own sake, but fits nicely in FOV with NGC 6871. OC Roslund 5 - 24mm EP. Another starry bit named. OC Messier 29 - 24mm EP. Also known as the Cooling Tower. A favourite, proper asterism. OC Berkeley 86 - 24mm EP. Too many stars around it to confidently pick it out. ** Beta Cygni (Albireo) - 24mm EP. Must see. ** b3 Cygni - 24mm EP. Heads a neat semi-circular asterism. OC NGC 6811 - 24mm EP. Enhanced with a 13mm EP. Fainter than its surroundings, it's a nice delicacy well worth seeking out. PN NGC 6826 (Blinking Planetary Nebula) - 13mm EP. Had fun with this. It actually blinks with AV! Look away to see more. Not a concept easily explained to one's significant other. ** 16 Cygni - 24mm EP. Nice. ** Theta Cygni - 24mm EP. Neat little pseudo-asterism with nice colour. ** V2080 Cygni - 24mm EP. ** Omicron Cygni - 24mm EP. Nice colours. OC Messier 39 - 24mm EP. Took me a few attempts to locate this one; didn't really have its "Get Your Cluster Here" sign turned on. Then again, it was past 4 a.m. by then and starting to get light.
    6 points
  13. The Sky at Night TV program is being broadcast at 10.00 pm this Sunday 13th May on BBC4. The episode is ' Gaia: A Galactic Revolution' I am looking forward to seeing the first results of this space probe which is trying to create a 3D map of our galaxy.
    5 points
  14. Hey-ho So then, just as i thought the DSO season was well and truly over for me until late August/early September, as it turned out last Saturday night (May 5th) was mostly clear, so i set about trying to finish the NAN image i had captured in Ha a while back (see thread below): So all i needed was some OIII. It's obviously not the ideal time of year to capture this i know, as it's so low on the horizon, but beggar's can't be choosers so i tried my best to make the most of the small amount of astro dark time available and just make the best of it. In the end i managed 9 subs, two of which were sub-standard due to passing clouds, but as is my want these days i still asked APP to stack them (using the Quality setting) and it didn't seem to affect things. So in total this is: Ha: 7 x 480s, 6 x 1200, 13 x 1200 (a little over 7 Hrs) OIII: 9 x 1200s (3 Hrs) RGB (with IDAS-D1 filter): 20 x 60s The usual Flats & Bias, stacked in APP and processed in PS. Gear used: Nikon D5300 (modded); SW 80ED (510mm FL); HEQ5-Pro; SGPro and PHD2. The RGB subs were used solely for the stars. I still need to get better at merging them with the NB channels, i'm not as good as i'd like to be at controlling them. Although in this instance, i did mask the stretching of them, and it definitely helped, but i need to practice this to get better at it. I think the fact that the RGB stack (even at just 20 mins) contained some nebulosity didn't help things. When it's just stars and nothing else, it's so much simpler to combine them. So this is just a Version 1 for now (i'll try an sSHO next). I used Ha for Red, OIII for Blue, and used one of Carboni's Actions to synthesize the Green channel. Then went round and round in circles trying to find a colour balance to my liking (on my rubbish monitor!) so i'd love to hear what you guys think. Too dark? Too much saturation? (i tend to do that, lol). I also couldn't decide on orientation, so have included two different ones. Which do you guys prefer? All C&C welcome. Don't hold back! I'm always looking for ways to improve. Clear skies!
    5 points
  15. Well the TOE 4mm has arrived ? should get to use it soon, hopefully midnight tonight.
    5 points
  16. Bit better conditions today, AR2709 plus prom. Dave
    5 points
  17. 60mm Lunt Double stacked with 60mm Coronado and PGR Blackfly cam Much happier with todays image. Click through for full size
    5 points
  18. This was delivered by hand by Padma from NASA ?
    5 points
  19. My neighbour shouted over to me to look up this afternoon and saw my first ever sun halo. Quite an impressive sight. Managed to get a snap on the phone. I suppose that means the forecast rain is on the cards.
    5 points
  20. On the night of May 8 I didn't just get some data on M13, but also on M51. I gathered about an hours worth of data using the ASI178MM behind my little APM 80mm F/6 triplet. By accident, half the data weren't collected as FITS files, but rather as SER, but I managed to combine the lot, although the subs converted from SER to FITS by PIPP weren't flatfielded by Astro Pixel Processor. Still nice result. Combined with the data from my first take the result is clearly better. More data are needed, but I really like the results I am getting from the ASI178MM on DSOs
    5 points
  21. Smidge darker than last time out . Some great contrast with full fields and fainter companions showing. 23mm giving x43 and a 4.5 Tmb giving a stable x222. Super seeing and transparency. Of interest , ΟΣ 525 splitting open a delicate 1.8", easy with bigger apertures. Really pleased with this one. Both Σ 2483 and Σ 367 give remarkably faint companions to tease out in a low power field. Helios did make some ace achros, these early models certainly get results. I used a WO erecting prism diagonal with fine helical focuser. North being anti-clockwise from west on the views. It's a boon for focusing on ancient fracs , under clear skies ! Nick.
    5 points
  22. Hi all. I managed a few hours of clear skies last Wednesday night and randomly decided to go for this little cluster. I had issues recently with rotator induced tilt so i dropped that but i think i still have something going on in the bottom right corner. I also decided to drop my light pollution filter, reduce sub length and increase gain to 50 as there's a large drop in read noise and only a marginal decrease in dynamic range. I found this remarkably noise free, but it's also a bright area so testing will continue. The cluster is what i was after so i centered that and ended up with the framing below. Hope you like it. Imaging telescope: Takahashi Epsilon 130d Imaging camera: Zwo Asi 071 Mount: SkyWatcher AZ EQ6 Software: Sequence Generator Pro Seqence Generator Pro Resolution: 4852x3194 Dates: May 9, 2018 Frames: 88x150" (gain: 50.00) -20C Integration: 3.7 hours Darks: ~30 Flats: ~50 Bias: ~50 Avg. Moon age: 23.43 days Avg. Moon phase: 36.49% Bortle Dark-Sky Scale: 4.00 Astrometry.net job: 2054861 RA center: 305.775 degrees DEC center: 40.752 degrees Pixel scale: 2.294 arcsec/pixel Orientation: 182.642 degrees Field radius: 1.851 degrees Locations: Back Garden, Cork, Ireland Jpg Richard.
    4 points
  23. Here is 155 mins of data taken with the Esprit 150/Mesu 200/G2-8300, less than ideal with a loss of Astro darkness and the moon still up for some of them. These targets are now disappearing behind the neighbour’s house so no more data for a while. I’m having a go at doing all of the processing in APP, but still not there yet. Not sure why the calibration and stacking hasn’t eliminated all of the satellite trails and the noise reduction isn’t as straightforward as in StarTools, but it’s pretty intuitive to use, sliders are good! Details below, please don’t ask why the weird number of colour subs, it’s a long story... L 7 x 300 secs R 8 x 300 secs G 9 x 300 secs B 7 x 300 secs Thanks for looking
    4 points
  24. I've never done any wide field before, but after wearing myself out with many late nights I was feeling too tired to drag the imaging rig out last night! I decided to just use a static tripod, my canon 200d with 18-55mm kit lens and a remote shutter. I stacked 85 shots of 16s at Iso1600. Stacked with deep sky stacker and edited with star tools
    4 points
  25. Hi. Centered around the faint Galaxy NGC5689 can be found the Galaxies NGC 5682/5693. A nice grouping imaged with a dual set-up of a 80ED + Atik 314+ mono and a second 80ED + Atik 320E. 18x600 secs Lum. 6x600 secs RGB. Images aligned and resized in Registar software. Full calibration frames applied. Cheers. Mick.
    4 points
  26. Did a few tweaks to the May 8-9 data from M13 Just a touch better I feel than the first processing I did (shown below) More data are needed of course, and perhaps a bit wider field to capture nearby NGC 6207. IC 4617 is already in the frame
    4 points
  27. From the 7th May 2018, just before midnight so astronomical dark (except for the West London H&F light pollution haze - so it's never properly dark). Bottom part of the constellation Virgo, the bright star to the right side of the image is Spica; see UniMap ID image. Visible in the original 50MB TIFF image are Stars down to the magnitude 10 range. Hand held, against a window frame (2 second Mirror Up before shot timer). Nikon D800 with Nikkor 85mm f/2.0 lens at f/2.8, 4 off 2.5 seconds exposures, ISO800; IDAS-D1 Light Pollution Suppression Filter. Processed with DxO PhotoLab, Deep Sky Stacker & Photoshop.
    4 points
  28. My best Jupiter shot so far: Meade 90mm f8.8 refractor. Camera was modded Logitech C310, with 2x barlow. 20 sec video, stacked in AutoStakkert, processed in RegiStax.
    3 points
  29. Jupiter and Io Photo taken on the same day as the one I consider my best photo so far. The seeing had already degraded considerably in relation to an hour before so it did not get as detailed as the previous photo. I'm just going to laugh if this top pick is on AstroBin and the other is not! https://www.astrobin.com/346263/
    3 points
  30. I came across this in my local branch yesterday. Haven't tried it yet but I do like the label.
    3 points
  31. That genuinely surprises me.. I've tried them all apart from the 42mm (which I understand is a superb low power unit).. I always felt that the longer focal lengths from (and including) 13mm upwards were the best, although all are very comfortable to use. My personal favourite is the 22mm (the only LVW I still have), and I sold my Pentax XW 20mm in favour of the 22mm - it's that good. Actually, if I was nominating a "World Cup" mid-wide angle eyepiece team it could very well consist of XW 3.5, 5, 7 and 10mm "up front", 13mm, 17 and 22mm LVWs in "midfield", and XW30, ES 34mm and LVW 42mm "at the back". In goal perhaps a vintage 50mm Japan Erfle for a laugh??. FWIW I felt that the LVWs are significantly superior in every way to the Hyperion's, especially at the edge of the field and in terms of contrast?. Dave
    3 points
  32. Well I missed the postie earlier in the week so had to do my own delivery, but very happy with my new acquisition
    3 points
  33. Again seeing wasnt good and above the roof but at least i can see it...c9.25 and zwo 120mc.
    3 points
  34. @John I know you like a bit of equipment history. Well I have just received an email from one of the TVS astronomers telling me that the 17.5 inch Newt that I used was given to them by Dr Jack Marling the founder of Lumicon. He was one of the founder members of this club.
    3 points
  35. Don't try collimating the refractor yourself! If you bought it here in the UK, send it back to the vendor. There's a five year warranty on every Tak, so touching the collimation may void it. Also, you don't want to risk injuring the fluorite element in the process. Some UK Takahashi vendors are very capable at re-collimating the lens cells, but if not its something they can pass back to Tak who will correct the problem for you, or if absolutely necessary, may replace the scope.
    3 points
  36. I'm after the following: 3mm, 5mm, 6mm, 30mm, 35mm, 45mm, & 55mm Clave' (3rd generation) Just need to start saving some money first
    3 points
  37. Final eyepiece ??? . I will put a bet on that it is not. There is no cure for being a collectionist , apart from bankruptcy☺ I think you are trying to be FLO customer of the year . And you are surely winning at the moment. Some nice eyepieces you have though?
    3 points
  38. After been away for work I returned back home last night, and with skies been clear I decided to have another go at imaging Jupiter, which is now at opposition. Seeing wasn’t great, but I decided to use my Celestron 4SE Mak to image with my ZWO ASI 120 mc camera fitted. Didn’t use my ZWO ADC this time. Results were not as great as a few nights back, but OK’ish considering the seeing conditions. First image below is form last night at opposition, and to compare it with my first images I took on the 7th with my C8 SCT a few days ago for comparison. No GRS in view this time alas.
    3 points
  39. Here's one from my dim and distant past. Circa 1985, Astro Systems (Bedford) 6 inch F/6 (David Hinds primary mirror) on a Fullerscopes Mk II equatorial built for me by Dud Fuller. Saw Halleys Comet with this one
    3 points
  40. At almost 13 seconds of arc Mars, despite its low angle, was rewarding to sketch. Albedo features revealed themselves quite easily.
    2 points
  41. Quark Chromosphere, DMK41 mono, TS 60ED
    2 points
  42. theres a great set of proms on the oncoming limb with bits starting to lift, hope you have clear to view. here a qwickly processed shot. charl.
    2 points
  43. Pauls the expert, but I second the Cliffs of Moher, also Brandon Mountain, the Burren and the John F. Kennedy Arboretum. The whole area around Cork is wonderful but I'm biased because 1/4 of me is from there Don't worry about clothes - Primark was founded in Ireland look for a 'Penneys' and you'll be able to clothe yourself for 2/6
    2 points
  44. To reduce all the cables, I mounted a small form PC (a Gigabyte Brix) onto the brace, along with 12VDC power distribution from HobbyKing. This powers everything except the SBIG camera including the PC, focuser and fan (and in future the dew heater), so there's only 2 cables between floor and scope (1 once my new QHY cam is on there). Wiring is all zip tied along the trusses where possible to keep it tidy. The PC communicates via wireless. The last real addition to the scope so far to bring us up to date is the shrouds - these were a present from my wife and made by Heather at Scopeshrouds - they are very well made and will be excellent at blocking out stray light. I do need to mask off the various power lights in the dome (on the power distribution, wifi router that the Gemini plugs into, the PC, etc!), but most point away from the scope at least.
    2 points
  45. The spider shown in the previous post was a custom build by Klaus Helmi (who I believe makes hardware also sold by Teleskop-Express). It's really a lovely piece of kit - very well engineered, and much easier to adjust than the previous spider I had on the SPX which was made by Protostar. The secondary cage is bolted together by two countersunk M10 bolts that screw into star inserts inside the 4 connecting 1.5" pipes. The star inserts were from Jetpress and can be found here: http://www.jetpress.com/Products.aspx/otelfxlw12/TubeConnectorNuts/ (it took me a while to find something like this). The design of the spider allows a dew heater to be placed behind the secondary with wires feeding along the vanes and down the hollow threaded stalk. The spider vanes thread through the aluminium tube - slight rework here as I realised the star nuts sat beyond the spider mount points! While this was being built, I asked another friend who is a welder to make up a central brace, again, following Rolf's original and something along the lines of this drawing:
    2 points
  46. John, go on, buy it, you know you want to. Then you can sell it to me in 3 months for a fiver, sorted ?
    2 points
  47. Alternatively, use a camera with very small pixels. I am getting very encouraging results with my ASI178MM at a focal length of just 480mm: These are just L-band images, but I hope to add R, G, and B data soon.
    2 points
  48. A coin, a clamp, and an eyepiece (my final buy).
    2 points
  49. And here is the final eyepiece. A Takahashi 28mm 60 degree Erfle. It has about 20mm usable eye relief with its eye cup rolled down, or removed. Takahashi's largest AFOV ep. About on a par with Vixen LV eps. The eye lens is much much nearer it's cylinder top than either LE or Abbe Ortho eps. Eye cup aperture is wider. Being 1.25 the Erfle is light. Less than a TV 32mm Plossl. Same robust feel and checkered rubbery grip band. And Japanese made My final eye piece, I am glad it's so pleasing. And intentionally an Erfle as was my very first, a Vixen 32mm. Many thanks to @FLO for ordering the Tak, & the other rarey eps I have bought from them recently. This 28mm joins Vixen 32, Antares 32 & 40, TAL 12, Fullerscope 20 & GSO 30 in my Erfles case. 5 lens fun. Need to get to use some now!
    2 points
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