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Showing content with the highest reputation on 12/01/17 in all areas

  1. Not much to say except this is the first time i have managed to get the four trapezium stars.... just about, so i'm a very happy chappy. Next time this is getting 10hrs instead of 1hr.
    23 points
  2. Hi all, Just thought i'd share my first moon shot using the etx90 and my 6D - I've had similar results using a telephoto. The Moon by Matthew Doogue, on Flickr
    11 points
  3. Tonight's Venus and Neptune Conjunction. Nikon D3200 DSLR, x2 teleconverter on the Skywatcher 200PDS. 2 second RAW exposure, ISO 3200. Closest approach ( I think ) according to a new feature I found on Stellarium v0.15.1, was at 21:06hrs UTC, when the pair would be below the horizon. I caught them at 17:42hrs when they were a little way above the roof tops. Seeing was terrible yet again, but I'm happy with the capture. I could just make out Neptune in the finderscope, and got a slightly better view through the camera viewfinder, so I was sure I had the pair both in the field of view.
    11 points
  4. Not posted for a bit, but I did recently capture some half way respectable OIII data for the Crab, which I've here combined with some Ha/S/Lum data from last year - some of it reprocessed. This is with the C9.25 with reducer and Atik 460, which I think gives a nice image scale for this object if you want to see the pulsar properly and a bit of structure (but don't bother at this scale without an off-axis-guider). Colourful Ha(red)/S(green)/O(blue) palette :-). (About 12 hours all in) Tim
    10 points
  5. These shots were taken at the beginning of December but I've only just got around to processing them properly. They were inspired by some of Gina's Ha widefields, I thought I'd try putting a very fast lens in front of my Ha filter and DSLR to see what I could get. The first three shots were taken with a Carl-Zeiss 35mm f2.4 lens wide open. This is 45 minutes on Orion and Monoceros, showing Barnard's Loop, the Angelfish and the extended nebulosity above the Rosette. Can just make out the Christmas Tree and Cone at this focal length. Next up is Cygnus, with the NAN, Pelican,
    7 points
  6. The QHYCCD PoleMaster polar alignment system is generating a lot of interest and it certainly seems to work very well indeed. The process is very simple and following the on-screen prompts makes it quite easy to achieve a very good polar alignment but the instruction manual does come in for a lot of criticism. Sooooooo ....... I''m sure you can guess what's coming ....... My own version of the Polemaster manual - enjoy! PoleMaster User Manual English UK Northern Hemisphere.pdf
    6 points
  7. I'm on a bit of a processing roll, catching up with several image data sets captured over the last few months. Here is my rendition of NGC 281 - The Pacman Nebula. The data was captured in November and December last year and constitutes the first light image for my new Altair Wave Series 102 ED (with 0.8x PlanoStar reducer / flattener) that I purchased at the UK Astro Show back in October last year (with Barry-Wilson's help in selecting how to spend my dosh - thank you Barry, I'm a very happy astro-imager!). Capture details are: Altair Wave 102 ED with 0.8x reducer, QSI 683-WSG
    6 points
  8. This has been sitting on my hard drive waiting to be processed since early December. Taken with an H-alpha modified Sony A7S on a Takahashi Epsilon 180ED (500mm focal length at F2.8). 440 x 30sec exposures at ISO 10000 giving a total integration time of 220 minutes (3h 40min). Sky quality was 20.7 mags/arcsec_squared and ambient temperature around 0C. Mark
    6 points
  9. The 6D is ok with Ha as it stands, use as is. A test image with a 6D and nifty fifty at f2.8, this was just 7x30sec exposures. As you can see no problem with Ha.
    6 points
  10. Following viewing the conjunction earlier, the skies stayed clear so I've turned my ED120 onto the double stars in Orion. The usual "warm up" acts of Rigel and Sigma were straightforward and very crisp. The more challenging Eta Orionis was quite routine and very clean from 150x upwards. Theta (the Trapezium) lovely and the E & F stars glimmered next to their brighter companions. Up to 32 Orionis which can be tricky with a separation of (I believe) 1.4 arc seconds. This was nicely resolved at 225x. Then I pressed my luck on 52 Orionis and was pleased to see the "kissing double" finally show
    5 points
  11. A qwick one tonight dodging fast moving cloud, seeing not too fantastic, theres a lot of haze. kit- AR127L, 1200d in 1:1 crop mode. 48 frames outa 250 staxed with regi and shot from my obsyroom open window. thanks for looking ,clear skys, charl.
    5 points
  12. The large crater Petavius is one of the most impressive and interesting craters on our Moon. It undergoes great changes of appearance as the sun rises and changes its course in every lunation (orbit around Earth). The crater is 182 kilometers in diameter and about 2.1 kilometers deep. The central peaks are more than a kilometer in height. The walls of the Petavius are abnormally large in relation to the diameter of the crater presenting a double border on the east and west sides. The east wall climbs about 11,000 feet. The crater looks oval rather than round, seen from Earth, but this is an
    5 points
  13. And I really do mean smash and grab. Here's the best two single frames of about 15, one barlowed at 1.5x and one without. Captured during a small gap in the heavy stuff through the fainter wispy stuff. I saw the gap, setup the 102, got about 10 without the barlow, switched to get another 5 and that was it before the cloud was too much again. The Present Mrs Foster wouldn't have even noticed I was gone if I hadn't told her first. Both are processed lightly for the sparkly naked eye full moon look (or at least that's what I think) The full disk first, a little bit of detail on the
    5 points
  14. I'm observing it right now. 19:20IST both in view. 40mm eyepiece skywatcher 150/1200 Venus on top Neptune in center.
    5 points
  15. The Elephant Trunk Nebula. Full Moon and cloud dodging tonight to acquire this one.30 x 2min 7nm Ha subs. Zwo ASI 1600 Mono Cool . Set at unity gain . Altair Astro 72 ED scope.
    5 points
  16. I forgot to share this one last month. Between travel for business and brutally cold weather closing down my nearby imaging location in the mountains I have not had time to image this year. This was taken at the beginning of December and contains a very busy wide field splitting the constellations Taurus and Perseus. The better known DSO's are M45 the Pleiades reflection nebula and NGC 1499 the California emission nebula. The center of the image contains a dark nebula which I am not familiar with and the rest of the region is quite heavily laden in ISM interstellar medium dust. This image
    4 points
  17. Having seen StargeezerTim’s very nice Flaming Star nebula with DSLR and UHC filter, I thought I’d have a go too. Turned out to be a bit trickier than I thought. First off, Tim has a 200mm lens where mine’s 300mm. So the framing had to be fiddled with - in fact the framing turned out to be a big headache cos I couldn’t see anything on Liveview with the UHC filter in place. Tim – if you see this I’d love t know how you dealt with this! Maybe I could have framed it without the filter, then moved to a star bright enough to focus on with the filter, and then go back to the nebula and hope
    4 points
  18. I bought a few eyepieces from my friend paulastro today and thought I'd try them out on Venus. Generally I tend to use a binoviewer for lunar and planetary observing, but tonight I used the TMB Planetaries. For Venus I used the 4mm! The subtle detail was not so easy to see using Cyclops viewing and floaters were much more obvious than while using both eyes. Mike
    4 points
  19. Hi, Sarah. I have the 150P and can confirm it is not that heavy - but it can be awkward to move both parts together. This would be even worse going up and down stairs. I don't have to navigate stairs and still prefer to move it in two parts. As has been written above, viewing through a window is not ideal (as you know already) but the Dob is not well suited to that anyhow - although I don't know what your window is like, of course. And, as I read it you are going to be up and down stairs quite a lot so it could end being a case of 'why bother'? That wouldn't be good. Also, I'm guessing yo
    4 points
  20. Here is my image of NGC1499 - The California Nebula: Shot details are: William Optics Star 71, QSI 683-WSG8, Baader 1.25" filters, HEQ5 Pro RGB: 24 x 300s each H alpha: 13 x 1800s H beta: 16 x 1800s Total Integration Time: 20.5 hours This one didn't come out how I had in mind. It was an experiment with a newly acquired Hydrogen Beta filter. I had hoped that the HBeta filter would introduce some blue to the image, but however I tried to process this one, very little blue colour was inclined to come to the party! Anyway, once I resigned myself to the lack
    4 points
  21. This mosaic of 13 images took just 2 nights to gather the data, it took almost the same time to process. I think it counts as wide field as it's taken with my 135mm lens on a modified 1200d. I also used a CLS filter and my Star Discovery Alt-az mount. Each image is 45x45s at 1600 ISO. Monkey head to Horsehead mosaic. Nige.
    3 points
  22. Its good to be doing Venus again even with less than ideal filter system I tried as much as I could to bring out any subtle detail that is there. The bright patch is real, as its showing on all the captures. Seeing was awful so that's not helped either. Also I think the IR block filter i am using is blocking some UV not just IR If i can get a BG 39 to go with the W47 I think a lot more detail will come out. W47+Altair IR block 245mm Orion ASI 290MM
    3 points
  23. Terry bought me a new flight case for Christmas to house my CCD camera, filter wheel, filters, guidescope, TeleVue FF/FR, WO extender and cables. Been busy this evening fitting it out. Looks great and I know my gear that is specifically for imaging is now together in one case
    3 points
  24. Another quick tip for all of us D.I.Y'rs... If you have a lot of fuses in your project, you may want to make an indication for them so you can find a dead one easily. Tiny LED's added on the load side of your fuses can go to an Off state if the supplying fuse blows. No Glow = No Go. (Example 1, EXAMPLE 2) (This, I find, can be useful for my aging eyes, or where there is an abundance of fuses.) I mean, if you want sexy in your power supply, this is Wow factor. (I simply use my eyes, or one of my meters...)
    3 points
  25. I had a brief gap in the cloud lastnight so grabbed my self a few frames of my fav DS object, its my firstlight with this setup. seeing wasn't it best, very hazy and it was only clear for about 45min. 20x 45 sec, iso 1600 + 5x 20sec iso 1600, just lights. I'm very pleased with the little C6-N ,its just the right size for shooting from indoors. thanks for looking, clear skys , charl. over did this one for fun.
    3 points
  26. The XW's are some of the best eyepieces ever made IMO! Mike
    3 points
  27. 3 points
  28. 3 points
  29. I think one of the things that drives upgrades are the fact that most astronomical objects are relatively unchanging with a given set of gear. The obvious perception is that something better or larger will open up a new take on things. If this is your perception then it is one of the classic signs of "aperture fever".
    3 points
  30. If anyone is doing this with a big scope they might also want to go asteroid spotting
    3 points
  31. Heads up if your near the wimborne area orion 10" £95 good buy i would say https://www.gumtree.com/p/binoculars-scopes/orion-10-inch-telescope-super-mirror-large-finder/1209616108
    2 points
  32. They are superb, but the Delos range matches them I feel, and with a parfocaliser ring I have the 8mm Delos playing very nicely with the XW trio I have Beautifully parfocal now. Might just slip a 6mm in as well
    2 points
  33. I pulled out the EQ3 and 150 f/8. Found Venus, and watched the sky darkening and identified one or two that may have been Neptune, doing fov calculations in my head - first light through that scope for me. Then put the ST102 on instead, and tried the 6mm - CA awful. So hauled out the 8.5" dob. 30mm framed them nicely, and letting Venus drift out of view gave a slightly improved colour. Tried 17mm and 6mm but couldn't tell the difference between disc and soft focus. Focuser is screw-in plumbing parts and EPs far from parfocal, collimation is out and mirror coating is gubbed, so stuck
    2 points
  34. Thanks - Meade UK have just contacted me on twitter to discus them using the image
    2 points
  35. All good stuff from rockystar, Sarah. Keep going and take your time. There's no reason to rush - despite your obvious enthusiasm ? - and worth trying to make sure you're happy with your purchase. Keep asking questions ... and happy hunting!
    2 points
  36. sorry, should have said" reduce chance of shorting, not that you cant - people can be vey inventive in that regard
    2 points
  37. He, he that's not snow it's very close stars! Nice photo. Cheers, Steve
    2 points
  38. 2 points
  39. Interesting stuff! I've not tried them at the same time but alternate sessions. Sounds crazy almost but my best view of Jupiters Great red spot was with an ED80, it was sooo red! Although others were reporting the same GRS views that night so it could have been more the night rather than the scope....I like to think it was the scope Isn't the 200pds leaned towards imaging with an over sized secondary for better field illumination? In which case probably not the best scope for planetary contrast but the resolution would have been better if the seeing was good. This is another point! I
    2 points
  40. Oh, and if your son is just five years old it will be a challenge for him to get to the eyepiece of the 150 Dob on most occasions.
    2 points
  41. You've got it backwards. Offset is (effectively) the number of electrons (after amplification, determined by gain) that corresponds to an ADU value of zero. So if I read out a pixel and get a value of 15 electrons, with an offset of 14 I will get an ADU of 1, an offset of 15 gives me an ADU of 0, and an offset of 16 also gives me an ADU of 0 since everything with an electron value below 16 will be clipped to zero ADU (black). That's why as you increase gain you increase the offset. Higher gain values lead to higher minimum electron values (i.e shifting the histogram to the right), so
    2 points
  42. So here is the twin paradox with 3 identical clocks. From the perspective of clock 1 clock 2 is moving in the x direction at 3/5 c while clock 3 is moving in the x direction at -3/5 c. Looking at the left hand diagram (which is drawn in the frame of clock 1) clocks 1 & 2 are synchronised at t=0 x = 0 as they pass . Clock 2 then meets clock 3 which is synchronised with it. Clock 3 then meets clock 1 and the times compared. I have labeled the paths of the clocks (their world lines) with the "Proper Time" recorded by them as they go along. The proper time of clock 1 is the time it
    2 points
  43. The 150P dob is very light and easy to move around - especially in two bits which makes it a bit easier on stairs - and it reassembles with ease - no flaff at all really 1-2 mins max. Yes you can fit wheels to it but it really won't be necessary. It will however be difficult to point out of a window - which isn't ideal anyway. Maybe a tripod would be better for your lad. Here's the dimensions: Dimensions (approx) Tube Height 45" / 115cm Width 8" / 20cm Base Height 30" / 76cm Width 19" / 48cm Overall (as pictured) Height 50" / 128cm Width 19" / 48cm Hth
    2 points
  44. Warpout, as said above, if this is your first filter, then UHC makes the better choice. I use mine on more objects than my O3 for example. i started out with the skywatcher UHC from FLO and it served me well for a couple of years, it improved many nebula noticeably. i have now moved on to the much more expensive astronomik version, which is noticeably better than the skywatcher. but you get what you pay for with filters seems to be the rule, there don't seem to be any shortcuts. if your scope uses a star diagonal, then also consider that the filter can be screwed into
    2 points
  45. My AVX mount came with a "cigarette" type 12 volt power cord. In the nose of it lives a 5 amp fast blow glass fuse. And it's blown a few of them when the motor drives have failed. I went to a local store called Radio Shack and bought replacements. Since the second warranty repair I've fed the mount only battery power and have had no further troubles. Batteries produce pure DC power. My CCD's cooling system likes a 2 amp protection, but it has never had a problem. As Ray said, the fuses are for circuit (wiring) protections, not the electronics. In my experiences, by the time a fu
    2 points
  46. Been out in the back yard braving the wind to do a bit of full disc lunar imaging. Never the easiest to capture, but here is tonights full moon. Using Canon 100D and Skywatcher Equinox 80 ED refractor Single 1/640 second exposure at ISO200
    2 points
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