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Showing content with the highest reputation on 27/10/16 in all areas

  1. OK... So after pretty much one month after getting the 12" Flextube Dob I get to use it on some DSOs. The forecast was OK but also for fog rolling in. I took the chance and lugged myself out with a whole bunch of gear for the first time. Setting up was at least reasonably quick and aligning the RACI to the Telrad (which had been aligned previously to the scope) and then checking the primary collimation (very quick using the Cheshire!) I was good to go. I could see plenty of stars but there was indeed loads of humidity the dew attacking everything pretty much as I was setting up -
    20 points
  2. Simeis 147 the Spaghetti Nebula Ha. 65x600secs from the DSW widefield setup, equipment in my sig. Stacked in DSS post in PI and PS CC Thanks for looking.
    13 points
  3. Now its getting dark at a sensible time, and my latest project complete - I gave my 6 year old son control of the imaging setup for an extended run so he could have a go at a colour image. I showed him a pic of M31 and he decided to go for that one being as it isnt too hard. So for the first night he used the CCD to collect a stack of Lum before collecting the colour data with the DSLR in place the following night. Obviously, he couldnt stay up to help me pack away (way past his bedtime!) so I kept an eye on it for him.... thankfully we had a couple of uninterrupted nights of clear sky.
    11 points
  4. This is my RBG data from rural Sweden with a Canon 60Da and a 5" ES apo refractor (22 x 480") and Ole Alexander Ødegård´s Ha data from rural Norway with his mono modded Canon 6D and a 12" TS imaging Newton, so almost 5 hours total. I could probably have been a bit softer in the processing but it is also nice with a bit of drama in the picture. I have been starring on it enough now and would like to hear what you think, so any comments are welcome!
    8 points
  5. Free to use telescope can be found at the link below, you select your object and give the scope a few details about the photo you want to take and your email address, then wait for a couple of days for your picture to be emailed to you. http://mo-www.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/OWN/Own.pl Sorry if everyone already knows about it!!
    7 points
  6. I never seem to be pleased with my editing of the M45-data I´ve got but now I think I´m getting there! This time I pushed the faint nebulosity even harder but still managed to keep it together... sort of. I could have sharpened the nebulosity more but I like the dusty, fluffy look. This is a bit over 15,5 hours of data, captured using Canon EOS 1100D and a Canon EF 300/4L IS lens. My mount is a HEQ5 Pro Synscan, guided. 31*3 minutes 87*5 minutes 55*8 minutes All at ISO 800. I hope you like it, don´t think I will do much more reprocessing of this one now. No use beating
    5 points
  7. Since I haven't collected any decent data for a while I have been playing around with old data. This is M31 from a couple of years ago with some Stratton treatment. Not really technical or scientific but I liked it as an uncluttered desktop image...might try some other DSO images now...
    5 points
  8. Preparation continuing...
    5 points
  9. Last nights results. 4x120s plus 10x60s plus 20x45 plus 60x30s, Matching darks, flat and bias. DSS and new found methods with StarTools. 150p Canon 1300D I need to re stack without the 120's to see a difference, I think I will do a couple of different stacks to get an idea how effective the longer subs are. My clip in LP filter arrived today Cheers Nige.
    5 points
  10. I have been wanting to capture this target for some time as I have been fascinated by the strong 'serach light-like beam' of OIII streaming from the heart of the nebula and have been pleased to have been rewarded with some clear skies in the last few nights. The image comprises 16 x 1200s of Ha and 9 x 1200s each of SII and OIII, giving a little over 11hrs total integration. A friend helped tweak my reducer last weekend - thanks Mohamed - and provided some much needed encouragement as I have been down in the dumps having fractured my wrist 10 days ago (ouch & argh ). Processing usin
    4 points
  11. Spent an hour this afternoon replacing the two tent pole sections that snapped in the spring. Should be there by about 2pm with a bit of luck.
    4 points
  12. LA LA LA LA LA. Fingers in ears and eyes shut. first rule of fight club...
    4 points
  13. Hi. This is the calibrated and stacked file of the Andromeda galaxy imaging run from last week. Its from my terrace so moderate LP and thus gradients. I've tried processing it and resulted in lots of retakes. (Same story again !!!) But I thought I might invite the helpful folks here to process this data to know what can be achieved. Details: Canon 1100D (unmodded) , 130 PDS, HEQ5 Pro (with much better guiding!! cant believe that yet) about 40 x 3 min subs @ ISO 400. Darks, Flats and Bias. Here's the link to stacked file: https://www.dropbox.com/s/wq66kji8m4l1ni7/M31_180s_snrwe
    3 points
  14. Seems an easy target but it isn't. Need time to improve S/N ratio. There is a huge Ha area on the left, I was fooled and tried to remove the "gradient" Hope you like it! Thanks! The nebula Messier 78 (also known as M 78 or NGC 2068) is a reflection nebula in the constellation Orion. It was discovered by Pierre M\xc3\xa9chai n in 1780 and included by Charles Messier in his catalog of comet-like objects that same year. M78 is the brightest diffuse reflection nebula of a group of nebulae that include NGC 2064, NGC 2067 and NGC 2071. This group belongs to the Orion Molecular Clo
    3 points
  15. Quite a long post with a few pics and links but I hope you will find it of interest. Abell 78 is a PN with an interesting history that I couldn't find too many pics of so I thought I'd give it a go. This is 11x20min Ha, 9x20min OIII as HOO and some 3 min R,G and B for some star colour. The last pic is just the OIII. It's a pretty small PN but is nicely framed between two clearly different stars. This is the full FOV from my MN190 and Atik460. What's interesting about this PN is that after the central star had created the original PN (the red outer shell with some OIII
    3 points
  16. myself and my good lady will be arriving Saturday about lunch time
    3 points
  17. Chanced it and got parole early. Base camp established! Happy to lend a hand to anyone who needs it, just shout up, I'm down the end with some Leffe
    3 points
  18. Very impressive. Right im off to find a 6 year old to do all my astrophotography.
    3 points
  19. Dave To help balance I put one of those long magnetic knife racks on my small dob. That way one can simply place plate weights on it then slide them about to achieve balance, simples HTH
    3 points
  20. OK so about an hour ago I was on asking about how to gain good night vision. I went outside for about an hour and started to see hints of the milky way. It was then that I bright flash came across the sky and lasted for at least three seconds. It came over from behind my house, so I don't know how long it had been burning before I saw it. It was so big it was burning yellow and its trail across the sky was so bright it had a large affect on my night vision. Is this normal? Whether it is or not, it still frightened the living hell out of me lol. Thanks, Corkey
    3 points
  21. Great report Dave ! My 12" dob is still my most used scope despite the posh fracs that I've recently acquired. When the conditions are decent a good 12" can really dig deep into the sky and produce stunning planetary and lunar viewing too I find that I need quite a bit of weight on the back end of the scope when I'm using heavy eyepieces - most of mine are heavy ! I have 2 weights which I can put in 2 positions on the lower section of the tube to vary the counterweight effect. I've sort of got to know what combination works and as the scope nose dips I usually need to up the wei
    3 points
  22. Dave, I'm replying to this so I can have a proper read of your report later. All sounds excellent so far though, nice one! Im hoping to have a similar experience this weekend with my VX12L at Lucksall.
    3 points
  23. Glad you got out and are enjoying your new dob, Dave. Dobs rock Wait until you get under a crisp clear sky with it without the moisture. That sort of aperture will knock your socks off on DSOs. Paul
    3 points
  24. Damian just to add to his misery,he tripped over a guy rope, i tried not to laugh,but i wish i`d seen that! Mike
    3 points
  25. I have arrived at Lucksall.
    3 points
  26. This image was produced from data I took last year which I came across when cleaning out old files for archiving. At the time I did several Ha OIII L RGB combinations most of which were pretty garish but I hadn't done a simple HaRGB, so here it is at last, better late than never I suppose. It is a two panel mosaic taken through my C6 hyperstar with an Atik 428EX using Baader 1.25" filters, Ha is 18 x 300 sec and R,G and B is 12 x 480 sec each per panel. I hope you like it, thanks for looking. Mike
    2 points
  27. Hi all, I managed to get 15 x 360sec subs on the Iris nebula last night before the clouds spoiled it all. Taken with my SW 100ED native fl, canon 60D with cls clip filter, guided and dithered with the Mgen. Stacked in DSS and played with in my newly acquired PI. Hope you like it. Thanks for looking.
    2 points
  28. I thought this picture was quite amusing. Although the 127mm Maksutov is small in size it has a longer focal length than the 14" reflector!
    2 points
  29. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-37788444 Sadly, although somewhat inevitably... Unless it's another NASA hoax!
    2 points
  30. That's two South Wales plus two North Wales bara brith at the tea tent. Who's going to judge !
    2 points
  31. 2 points
  32. Its on charge as we speak, and with EHU i can recharge it
    2 points
  33. goodstuff Jules. there's plenty of fields around to fly it in and I'd love to see it. @Tim might bring his too
    2 points
  34. Here are the rest of the bunch from my mosaic night. They are all labelled to the best of my knowledge. Thanks for looking! Meade 10" ACF, ASI224MC. FC, AS!2, RS6, Gimp and ImPPG Plato crater and Montes Alpes mountain range above it. Two panel mosaic that didnt link up with my other photos. Moon_042150_g4_q43rs620_stitch by SolarT RM, on Flickr Archimedes in the center, Aristillus with the central mountain peak in the crater, Autolycus beside it. Montes Apeninninus mountain range behind them. Moon_042029_g6_q37tamegimpcurves2 by SolarT RM
    2 points
  35. Got round to fitting the new x-idler today. Here is the old one I removed first. It includes the very ugly clip-in adjustable tensioner I designed a while back (the white bits). The extra width this added to the printer is what is causing the current issue. I then assembled the new tensioner with the adjustment at the front. Finally this was fitted to the printer x-axis. Before and after shots: This actually reduces the overall width of the printer by 52mm. It now sits within the dimensions of the base enabling a fume enclosure to be const
    2 points
  36. I've had my mirror re-coated more times than I've washed it!!!
    2 points
  37. Well, after over 2 1/2 hours of imaging, I calibrated and reviewed the subs this morning and had to discard most of them due to cloud cover. I suspect I've still included subs affected by feint clouds as the resulting image is very noisy. Worst affected was my RGB where I ended up with very little data (hence the subdued tones). This is only 45 mins of 30s L subs with about 5 mins each of RGB. I only processed it quickly as there isn't really enough data yet. Saturday is looking clearer and if so, I'll hopefully add much more data to this. So, here's my first attempt at NGC1333:
    2 points
  38. PIPP will convert your file to a usable format. I am ignoring the question of whether RegiStax should be used for deep sky objects, though Deep Sky Stacker would seem to be the more natural choice. Cheers, Chris
    2 points
  39. Here is one stretched 15 min subframe from last night. No calibratiin frames or processing, so it is dirty and noisy. Just had 4 hours sleep. Back to bed now.
    2 points
  40. Whilst I was ruminating on the subject of stacking I thought I'd have another look at the DSS manual, and by chance came across a theory part that I hadn't seen before. No doubt others have, but here's the link anyway: http://deepskystacker.free.fr/english/theory.htm One of the details that caught my eye was the paragraph titled "Can I combine two (or more) resulting images?". Specifically this text, as I think it may have some relevance to Nige's question: " Absolutely, the square root rule applies with a small twist. When combining two images the SNR increases by 1.414 (square r
    2 points
  41. well after what seems like days got my first image i think (for me is okish)really is a steep learning curve from a colour dslr,i know ive dust bunnies and more data req,only used 5x1min subs,its a bit rough but believe me its a big step forward
    2 points
  42. This is always a tricky observation for me but the presence of 7331 nearby makes getting to the Quintet much easier. I don't have young eyes, which doesn't help! In the 20 inch under similar SQM values to Gerry I begin by sensing that there's something there and then have to coax it out. The cluster is small and tight with very uneven brightness within the components. I have to say I can't really make out their separation well enough to tell one from the other but I can see the Quintet as havng structure, certainly. The original discovery was made in Marseille, a couple of hours' drive to
    2 points
  43. It may well be the best you ever see. It sounds like a good one. I'm out a great deal all night and have only seen one that was in an entirely different class to 'the best of the rest.' It was a bolide, so it broke into fragments and blazed in brilliant red and blue light. I'm in SE France and another SGL member was in the desert south of Beirut. He saw it as well through the windsreen of a vehicle. Fortunately I was with a few others at the time and the collective yell that we let out was probably heard in Paris! Olly
    2 points
  44. Smashing report - I agree with all the above - my SW 12" flextube was a fine instrument and gave me great views of everything. I only let it go cos I eventually succumbed to aperture fever and upgraded to 16". Eventually I'll self build a 20". Have fun with it.
    2 points
  45. It's no coincidence if it happened when you had decided to go out and take your first serious look at the night sky; nature planned it to get you hooked on stargazing.
    2 points
  46. Great report, Dave - and especially encouraging for me since I'm planning on getting a 300P Flextube next! Doug.
    2 points
  47. I haven't had light pollution issues since leaving the big city back in the late 80's, I have the opposite problem now. Too many stars, so many in fact that while dark adapted I often become overwelmed and need a small dose of brite light to get back to my guide stars. Using something to cover you and your eyepiece I did for years it works very well and if folks aren't trying it they don't know what they are missing.
    2 points
  48. Just one point Mike. One question last time was very miss leading as the answer involved naming aa sci-fi tv series to which a particular creature was from. The answer was The Clangers. We all know that the Clangers are science fact....and not fiction.......
    2 points
  49. These boards are public - please DO NOT post Chris' email address. Try the PM first, if someone does have Chris' email address, then it would be common courtesy to ask Chris' permission first prior to sharing it (via PM). Ta Ant
    2 points
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