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Showing content with the highest reputation on 17/12/15 in all areas

  1. 6 panel mosaic using star71 scope and QHY9 ccd, stitched in MS ICE processed in PS 5
    14 points
  2. Following on from Sara's brilliant image of this, I have a wider view. 45x2 mins each RGB. 65x3 mins Lum.
    7 points
  3. I was hoping for less of auroral activity tonight but it turned out ok anyway. clear skies! -TW
    6 points
  4. Good Evening all and hello from a forum newcomer. Was hoping to post a new image or two as a first post but the weather has put paid to that, so thought I would introduce myself with a few images taken earlier this year. Imaged with a Canon 1100D modified, ED80 Sky Watcher for Horsehead and M31 Celestron SCT for the Whirlpool. Fingers crossed for good weather over the Xmas break. Thanks for looking and Merry Christmas to you all.
    5 points
  5. I suppose you could ask why the Orion Nebula is so popular or why people look at double stars or small features on planets and the moon; or why do people flock to see the Mona Lisa. I think it's that we like things that are renowned for whatever reason, a challenge or beautiful or even just to develop a 'list' of things.
    5 points
  6. Well, my post seems to have revived interest in the Calendar and, like me originally, it's clear that many members did not know that they could add events. I will add a few more for the next few weeks and perhaps others will do the same.
    5 points
  7. This is the closest I've come to a completed image since September, and with clouds for the foreseeable and a full moon over Xmas, it might be next year before any more imaging gets done. This one is deceptively difficult, if it wasn't obscured by the stars and dust of our own Milky Way this would be one of the brightest galaxies in the northern sky, but hidden behind our own galactic muck it takes a little bit of coaxing to get some decent signal. 6.6 hours in Luminance with an Altair Astro 6" RC and Atik 460ex, captured in Sequence Generator Pro during a rare and unprecedented break in the w
    4 points
  8. Hi Below are a couple of u-tube links showing the construction and installation of martin mobberley's 19.5 inch newtonian on an AE Optics mount . https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dUCJGpMfv4Q https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=91YN86jBR1U
    4 points
  9. Taken with ASI 120 & C9.25 - through a fleeting gap in the clouds Don
    4 points
  10. I have just built a dob base for non used 200p and I am converted. Set up time 25 seconds. Kids (under 5) can use it easily Cheap as chips to build the mount
    4 points
  11. WOW, absolutely shocked with the response from you all, thanks I will take your advice and hold of with eye piece for a while my son is 23 and has a good income so I will let him make his own mind up it looks like we have a lot of learning to do and questions to ask all of you, once again a massive thank you to you all.
    4 points
  12. The Rosette Nebula in Monoceros RGB - 45x 300 seconds @ ISO800 H-alpha - 18x 900 seconds @ ISO800 Modified Canon T3i AT72ED w/ 0.8x flattener Orion Atlas EQ-G http://www.astrobin.com/232498/ i think i like how this turned out... i might wake up tomorrow and decide i hate it. Still trying to figure out the best way to integrate the H-alphas. Added them to the reds and used it as a luminance layer for this one. I love the modded T3i, but the more I use narrowband filters, the more I want a mono sensor comments/critique always welcome!
    4 points
  13. If I get time, I'll write it up properly & put it on line somewhere.
    4 points
  14. I'd say no. Stay with the eyepieces you have for now. The consensus is probably right; the ones supplied are not the best. Neither is the one you have linked - by a long chalk. Best advice is use the EPs you have and figure out what you want to do with the hobby. Learn the scope, educate your eyes and then you have a foundation on which to base your choice of upgrade. For now, just enjoy yourself and have fun with your son.
    4 points
  15. Well, I think its never boring watching threads/posts about people searching for new objects for themselves There are always new objects to find and no matter how hard we try we will never see everything Me I'm still tryin' to see the Jellyfish.....
    3 points
  16. Tried pritstick? [emoji6] Sent from my SM-G901F using Tapatalk
    3 points
  17. Here we go first light with the Apo... Just cropped with the iPad to enlarge it, so some quality is lost, but no chromatic arberation so I'm quite happy
    3 points
  18. Re-process with better conversion.......I hope!
    3 points
  19. Alex welcome to the thread, and do please keep an eye on our events thread found here http://stargazerslounge.com/topic/254340-wakefield-and-district-astronomical-society-wadas-events-page/page-1 And please come and join us either at one of our observing sessions or even one of our meetings! Good luck to your grandson tonight Eric, shame you can't make it. Matt try to make it if you can. The wakefield traffic last night was a nightmare I was stuck in it, it was all due to the M62 being shut... Typical for a glob if you ask me!
    3 points
  20. The fact that it i s such a distinctive shape I believe is one of the attractions. I don't believe it's a test of skill so much as a test of ones observing conditions. A large scope at a good dark site makes it possible. A small scope in a city is not going to see it regardless of how good the observer. I know many good observers that have not seen it due to the simple fact they haven't gone somewhere dark enough to give themselves a realistic chance. I saw it from a pretty good site with a visible naked eye limit around mag 6. I used a 20" Dob and an H-Beta filter. I don't believe any othe
    3 points
  21. Hi, I've not posted an image in a long white. Not because I've failed to collect photons but rather I've been slow with the processing and publishing. I thought I'd post a few images today from the Autumn/Winter. Hope you enjoy. All imaged with the following set up. William Optics Zenithstar 105mm @F4.5, Atik 16HR + Astronomics LRGB + Baader HaOIIISII, iOptron IEQ45 PRO mount, software processing PI1.8 All subs generally 20 or 30 minutes autoguided (i) Veil Nebula - 9 panels total light collected over 25 hours in Ha (ii) NGC7635 Bubble Nebula (3.5 hours) (iii) NGC281 Pacman HaOIII (5.3 hour
    3 points
  22. I have the HEQ5 and have seen a few AVXs in action as well. I had a similar decision to make between the two, although I didn't flip between the two as much as you are doing . There is precious little between them in terms of end result I think. EQMod is indeed very nice, but it is by no means a showstopper in using NexRemote instead. I think you will be happy with either, as there really isn't much between them from what I can see. If I had to choose again, I would actually go for the AzEQ5, as the AltAz option seems a nice touch and it also fixes a few of the niggles with the original HEQ5.
    3 points
  23. Sorry to hear that Matt but you never know the roads might be clear. What am I saying there's more chance of clear sky's. There I go again how about this. There's more chance of Damian not having Choco..... No ... more chance of Vicky not talking no that's no good either soupy buying another dob I give up. Try anyway to make it Mark
    3 points
  24. One of those fatal temptations. We 'just' did a nice Jellyfish, HaOIIILRGB. But, see, M35 was so close along with whatsisname, that little powdery fella, NGC (just looking it up...) 2158. Hmmm. But, blow me, the Monkey Head is not too far off either and there's that (looking it up now) Sh2-147 there as well. Pity this will need a 4 panel when it scarely needs more than a two panel, but there you go. So after about 50 hours and three scopes (2xTak FSQ106N and 1xTEC140) Olly and guests and Tom and Yves can offer you this; Or at half size, https://ollypenrice.smugmug.com/Other/Best-of-Les-Gra
    3 points
  25. Yeah!, Come on, let's not take the joy out of Christmas. I can concede that some are way over the top with their creations, but that is Down to snobby one-upmanship. I like to see the seasonal lighting in moderation. Unfortunately, many areas of my City are not in the mood for this festive time, due to the devastating floods that have murdered their Christmas. I would love to see their homes deluged in lights, rather than the unsightly heaps of belongings outside their homes, awaiting removal to destruction. So, have thought to just how lucky you are, not to be going through
    3 points
  26. Had a bit of a hiccup last weekend with the Star Adventurer when the tripod I was using for it decided to sheer and is no longer stable. Times are hard at present, so I had a rummage around to see what I could use as a replacement tripod. Very impressed with myself today as I have once again used Vic's Tool Kit. Dug out the 8SE tripod, which I am not using, took the Star Adventurer off the other mount and hey-presto! Now I've got a really good solid dedicated tripod for it and I've no need to go out spending - win win situation. I am getting good at this Astro-fixing malarkey lol
    3 points
  27. I'm glad you liked it. You probably dont see that much of it further south. Auroras are beautiful but they can also really ruin your night photography. Forget about using your telescope that night. Here are two more taken around midnight. -TW
    3 points
  28. Hello All, I thought I would join a forum and say hello as we as a family are buying our first telescope to look at the planets and maybe a star or two and might need some help along the way. So a little about us as the merry family. The family is myself (John) and my 3 children plus the wife. However this new hobby is mainly for myself and my eldest son (8 years old) but my 5 year old daughter is very keen as well to see the moon and stars. So for Christmas my son as asked for a telescope and after some research (over a fair few days) and being from an IT background I was very keen to see w
    2 points
  29. As we had clear sky for what seems like the first time in ages I decided to point at a nice easy reliable target. Managed 90x75 sec images with 30 dark and 10 flats. All done with Star adventurer, 70d and Tamron 90mm macro lens. I even got a shadow of the Witchead Nebula!
    2 points
  30. In case anyone had forgotten , this from mu wife's aunt. Last night , Waternish , Skye. Very clear skies ! Nick. Even better from Staffin,
    2 points
  31. LOL, yes it's a bit like asking which leg is the most important for a tripod... :-) ChrisH
    2 points
  32. If the FSQ85 is an alternative then, despite a recent thread in which there was a problem instrument, I would rate it above all comers in the small apertures. With reducer it can work at F3.9 and both Sara and I found that it really could do so. But it's a lot more expensive! Regarding the real world and the image circle, I think it's simple. Experiment shows that the FSQ85 can't cover full format and the Star 71 can. If I could have a big Sony chip I'd have one. No question about that. It's just that, at the moment, I'm working in a world of huge mosaics and in that world the big Kodaks are w
    2 points
  33. A couple of 15 second exposures from the 17.03 ISS pass. Was very fortunate in that the ISS was being hotly pursued by a thick bank of cloud! Any tuition on how to combine my ISS photos into a single panorama shot would be greatly appreciated.
    2 points
  34. Same here, although your excellent report of the tv aerial reminded my of the first light of most of my scopes. We usually try for moss spore heads, lichen and even managed a spider wrapping up his lunch. Clear skies ! Nick.
    2 points
  35. There's surely some good sport to be had here while it's cloudy. Using the lights to collimate your optics. Spotting asterisms in the hedge at the end of the road. Seeing how many miles distant you can still resolve distant lights before they blur into one. Happy Christmas everyone
    2 points
  36. A couple of shots I took back in October and have finally got round to processing, hope you like: Equipment as per sig, QHY5liic through a 2x barlow. Blurb stolen from wikipedia - Mare Nubium ("sea of clouds") is a lunar mare in the Nubium basin on the Moon's near side. The mare is located just to the southeast of Oceanus Procellarum.The prominent crater in this picture is Bullialdus. The relatively isolated location of this crater serves to highlight its well-formed shape. Bullialdus has a high outer rim that is circular but observers have noted a slightly polygonal appearance. The inner
    2 points
  37. Hi Alex and welcome to our "little" thread. I think Mark has covered it all - feel free to drop in and chat any time. The website will give details of upcoming meetings and events, as well as the WADAS events thread. Well, if the clouds keep clearing as they are doing, we might get a chance to spot the ISS passing over at 5.03pm at 58 degrees. I'll give Tim Peake a wave as it passes over! Hmmm, think it's just about typical the skies are clearing when we are booked for our curry. Don't think I'll be in a fit state to do any viewing after the curry..... Moon is already up and looking lovely a
    2 points
  38. I agree with Tom above. The AVX is more a step up from the CG5GT goto which I had. I also had the HEQ5. My only preference was for the Celestron software which had a larger database of objects and felt slightly more intuitive to use. Otherwise there isn't a lot to choose between them in terms of tracking and capacity - neither would be a mistake imho.
    2 points
  39. The FSQ85 will not cover a full frame sensor .....
    2 points
  40. 'Seeing' in this context usually refers to the effect of atmospheric turbulence on the sharpness and steadiness of objects viewed or imaged through a telescope. These effects cause a star image to twinkle and to jump around to a lesser or greater extent depending on the degree of turbulence. In a long exposure image, the net effect of this jumping around is that star images are smeared into small disks rather than tiny points and it's the size of this disk that provides a measure of seeing. Because stars of different brightness produce disks of different size, the usual measure used is FWHM
    2 points
  41. That setup looks mint Vicky! I don't think I'll end up making it to the curry tonight, something can come up at work and being sent to site this afternoon, don't think I will make it back in time. With the bad Wakey traffic yesterday taking an hour to get home yesterday and now this, not having any free time this week Matt.
    2 points
  42. Missed the Geminids this year - utterly socked-in and warm/wet. We're forecast to be approaching 60F for Christmas. Maybe higher, so sayeth the weather-liars on the TV. So I'd wager they were the best Geminids ever - because we couldn't see them at all. Old New England saying: "If you don't like the weather, just wait a minute." Speaking of odd plant-life..... Dave
    2 points
  43. Nice write-up, Andy! I'm always interested in good reviews of eyepieces that don't cost as much as the national-deficit. And I am looking about for a lower cost EP in the 32mm range. Between you and Mak there, my choices are more finite now. Thanks to both of you! Dave
    2 points
  44. The eyepieces that come with the scope are basic but very useable, please dont worry about them just for now. As floater has suggested use them and learn the scope find your way around and most of all enjoy with your son. All the very best. Scott
    2 points
  45. Visit any aquatics shop with a clean receptical and ask for Reverse Osmosis (RO) water. You should be able to get 4 or 5 litres for £1 or less. Wash your mirror as above and then use the RO water to rinse. Leave mirror at a slight angle to allow the water to drain off. As Kerry says use the corner of kitchen towel to absorb some of the bigger droplets - et voila Sent from my Fone
    2 points
  46. Taken the clock apart again, made a PTFE washer and put it all back together with PTFE washer between hour wheel and minute pinion. Connected stepper and power and the clock now seems to be running correctly I shall let it run overnight and see if the time is still correct in the morning. Here's a new cross-section of the main shaft and gears etc.
    2 points
  47. I agree with Acey. It is a fabulous photographic target and the 'whole of Orion' image whch was more Tom's than mine is not the best way to see it. I did this with Yves a couple of years ago at an appropriate FL. I've 'seen' it three times in our half metre Newt but 'seen' is a euphemism for detecting that it's there. I don't think it is much of a visual object. The idea is to say that you've seen it's there - and that's not really what gives me a buzz in visual observing. I like saying 'Wow!!' Olly
    2 points
  48. Yes thats a very good point Paul. Thats one of the great things about this forum - when folks succeed in something they share it to encourage others that it can be done and are always happy to share tips and wrinkles on how to do it
    2 points
  49. For impression, I am always taken by the size and spread of Barnards loop and the lambda orionis nebulae... On for nights of good transparency. Yer dob friends don't get an advantage on the big nebulae.... Cheers Peter
    2 points
  50. One of the main attractions of astronomy to me is the lack of competition Mike. It would be nice to keep it that way IMHO.
    2 points
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