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Showing content with the highest reputation on 26/06/15 in all areas

  1. M7 cluster GSO 12" F/5 Canon EOS Rebel Xs GEM by Darío Pires and PICgoto++ 60x60" ISO1600 http://www.astrobin.com/full/189845/0/
    8 points
  2. Been a while since I posted anything here. I have a 5 hour DSLR image of the Sadr Region of Cygnus. 2 Nights have been stacked togather and process and layered.
    7 points
  3. No match for Olly's 400hr piccy but I've been following the progress of Barnard's Star for over 7years - below. It has the highest known stellar proper motion of 10.3"-arc per annum due north. Interest tweaked via Burnham's Cel Hdk [anyone use these now or in the past?] with it 1960 epoch position marked. Data on image with shots from 2008 July 29 and recently 2015 June 18 [main image]. range 6ly age ~9BY mv 9.5 red dwarf = BY Dra type annual PM = 10.3"-arc due north Hope its of interest. Nytecam
    7 points
  4. Not much to look at -- and in the hope that Pluto still belongs in the planetary section -- here's a couple of shots of the planet carving a surprisingly rapid path through Sagittarius taken yesterday and today (details on images). Aligned/superimposed in Nebulosity: In fact, the movement (around 3"/hour I think) is clearly visible on two shots taken 3 hours apart. cheers Martin
    6 points
  5. Hi all This morning I finished the fine grinding with another hour of 600 grit alu oxide. It now has the lap back ontop pressing but looked OK when I'd taken it off More later Damian
    5 points
  6. Hi folks, I've recently joined this site and this will be my first review/personal opinions on my first scope choice being the Evolution 9.25. I hope I'm posting this in the right place! I stumbled across this site time and time again when Googling various newbie questions and always found exactly what I wanted to know here, so I decided to sign up! I'm actually quite shocked at how friendly everyone is here and how willing, even enthusiastic you are about helping others! So thank-you for everyone who has pitched in and offered me countless pieces of advice so far! You're a great bunch!
    4 points
  7. Loved the evening frustrating though with the thin clouds so had to whack the ISO right up for shorter exposure, I would have prefered a lower ISO but ah well
    4 points
  8. GSO 305 mm - ASI120MC - FE-SE 3x - IR filter FL: 4565 mm - f/15 Sharpcap/AS!2/Castrator/Wavelets Registax 6.0/Photoshop CS3 - 150 de 1100 frames
    4 points
  9. I found another "obscure" nebula close to the Cat's Paw Nebula (NGC 6334 - http://stargazerslounge.com/topic/246326-ngc-6334-the-cats-paw-nebula/).There is so much objects out there waiting to be discovered when you are starting out... It's just great! I was going to continue my collection of Messier objects, but then I got side-tracked by something I even hadn't heard before. Anyway, I thought I share this one... it's big, it has a lot of structure and I love it . Clear skies! HJ
    4 points
  10. hi guys i imaged this last monday 30 frames imaged about an hour or so its taken me a few days to fathom out how to put a timelapse together in photoshop mark edit you need to click on the image
    4 points
  11. Need to spice up this thread with another galaxy image NGC 4565 88x60s subs unguided on EQ5 Pro. Image data from two nights in March 2015.
    4 points
  12. If you're aligning your finder then use a terrestrial object that doesn't move - distant building, etc. At night use a distant light if you're unfortunate enough to be at a place where one is visible. At my dark site at night I use Polaris to align the finder, again because it doesn't move. The Moon can be a convenient starter because it's big and easy to get in the field of view, but any moving target makes it harder to get really accurate alignment of finder and main scope.
    4 points
  13. Update, now 17x20 mins and counting: Full size here: https://www.flickr.c...eposted-public/ Another hour or two and I'm done with Ha The soap bubble nebula is begining to show, but it's extremelly hard from a city sky under the street lamps
    4 points
  14. Here are a few more dark nebulae observed in the last couple of nights. In all cases I used 15s subs. Conditions: SQM 19.7, some high clouds, 50% moon lowish in west, windless, 18C. Here's Barnard 92 in Sagittarius, a C-shaped dust cloud. I was hoping to have caught some of B93 also but I failed, so ignore the label. For the less well-defined dark nebulae I've found it helps to really narrow the histogram range -- for which reason I've included the next shot with the LL settings. The dark stays dark while the fainter stars become visible and the brighter stars burn out a bit.This is Barnard 87
    3 points
  15. Hi All, Finally got some clear skies last night to test out Paul's latest version of LL. Thank you very much, Paul. I decided to try the narrow band Ha filter with the color Lodestar. Because of the Bayer mask and the NB Ha being in the red part of the spectrum, resolution suffers, but as Dom has shown results are still pretty impressive. The other advantage with the filter is that it blocks also all other unwanted light, including the moon. Those in LP areas should give it a try. It only works on emission nebulae, but there are plenty of them out there. I thought I would share a few wit
    3 points
  16. Hi my name is John, I am new on here and my primary interest is wide-field astrophotography. Basically trying to incorporate landscapes into night sky photography with a bit of a leaning towards including the Milky Way. I shoot a variety of Canon equipment, my primary astro "go to" camera is my 1Dx fitted with a very old Canon EF 15mm fisheye as my weapon of choice. Attached is a shot taken earlier this week, I was out looking for the aurora which was widely reported as being visible in the South West. Failing miserable to see the green sky monster I was rewarded by a great view of Milky Way o
    3 points
  17. Hi all, This is a work still in it's early stage but I thought I'd share it, it's NGC 6888 the crescent nebula captured with the little SW ED80 with 0.8X reducer and mono & TEC cooled Canon 550D, this is proving to be very hard to get due to neverending bad weather, first day of summer now and it's almost raining here! I'm hoping to at least double the integration time in Ha (3 hours now, 9x20 min. subs @ 1600 ISO) and add the OIII later, si this will be a bicolor image, let's see if I can extract the fain OIII halo of this object from my city backyard, well now all I have to do is wait I
    3 points
  18. Got a gap in the cloud this evening, AR2371 is will soon be out of view, hope something new is around the corner! Sunset from the day before, showing AR2371 on the right side of the Sun. //Johan
    3 points
  19. Here is 36 minutes on the north American nebula area of the sky. 3 minute unguided shots with the canon factory 18-55 lens.
    3 points
  20. Grabbed an hour of twilight last night before the clouds arrived and finally got to test my newly modified PS3 Eye camera. Shot six short avi's at the prime focus of my Skywatcher Explorer 130 EQ2, did a bit of pre processing with PIPP, added a dash of stacking in Registax 5, and then produced the mosaic with the aid of iMerge.
    3 points
  21. this any good to you
    3 points
  22. So there I was, all set with a nice little redundancy windfall, and as bad a case of aperture fever as is possible, to buy into the big dob club with something 20-22" and fast. Make my 12yr companion, 12", Lukehurst dob take the back seat for a little while. I was soooo close - and was pretty set on a Waite Research Renegade, after a LOT of research and chatting to dob users round Central Europe. Then, I ruptured 2 discs in my back recently, and also got hammered on tax way more than expected, so that has stopped things. Lifting big heavy dobs not a good idea, and the budget was not as high. P
    3 points
  23. ...I may have just summoned an awful lot of clouds! I have been using an SLR (Nikon D300) for some time now and frustrated by light pollution, and clear nights always seemingly aligning with big fat Moon phases, I have finally taken the plunge and bought the ATIK 414EX, EFW2 - it's taken me many, many months of saving (I am but a minimum wage bartender) - but yesterday, it was pretty much Christmas for me, as I had the pleasure of unboxing (Oh and wow did FLO make unboxing epic, seriously well packed and protected) my first cooled CCD. I can't afford filters yet, but looking to have them come
    3 points
  24. I go along the line that I need to see darkness between the stars to consider it split, even if it's just a sliver of darkness. It's still fun to see touching or "kissing" pairs, waisted peanuts and the other terms used for a near but not quite split pair of stars though
    3 points
  25. Prom success and the vehicle was fab! The vintage motorbike escort was an added last minute bonus. My daughter is on the far left on the first photo
    3 points
  26. I decided to find a solution to the problem of looking through a polar scope with Polaris at 50°. After checking out some forums, including here, I came up with a solution that is a bit different than any I have seen to date. The polar scope of my ZEQ25 mount is flush mounted and that was the first problem. I bought an adapter from Paul Chasse (V5Astro) which backs the polar scope out far enough to allow access to the reticle adjustment screws. That also allows me to attach a right angle finder. Most mount owners won't have this problem. I purchased a Canon manual Right Angle Finder B from som
    2 points
  27. OK, I admit defeat in this round. I have tried an ambitious project to do a deep narrowband image of M16, but I have bitten off more than I can chew. This target is low in the North Essex sky, it is not imagable for long each night, there is no real darkness, and it crosses the meridian during the night and spends most of the time there. These factors have all conspired to make this an extremely chastening effort for me. I have now spent 4 sessions on this, and have 6 usable subs. 6. The rest are throw away, or the imaging messed up overnight etc etc. The main issue is tracking/guiding as I be
    2 points
  28. A few shots from last weekend taken with DMK21 & PST - dodging the clouds Don
    2 points
  29. I have new Astro gear!!!! At least I got mine at the right time of year, when it's pointless getting scopes out so it can be cloudy all it likes. 2" O111 filter, laser collimator and a SW AZ GOTO mount. Roll on late July when I can get a chance to use it in anger. Plus point is the synscan handset also works on my 12" dob, to aid my quest for faint PN's and for lazy viewing :-) but it'll primarily be used with my f5 frac in the caravan. I also might have a new ep incoming, but that's a little pressie for myself.........secret, sushhhhhh!
    2 points
  30. One word: Wicking and Breathable. Sorry, two words: Wicking, Breathable and Layers. Sorry, three words. Er, you get the idea... Cheers, Mark
    2 points
  31. This thread has been a fascinating read, thank you to all who contributed.
    2 points
  32. This image has nowhere near the depth when the image is less saturated I think im my opinion. I am sure that I could pull off less saturation if I had far more integration time. It loses some of the brown dusty clouds.
    2 points
  33. Hey, moon mosaic from last night done with evostar100/900 and dmk21. full resolution:http://www.astrobin.com/full/189697/0/?real=&mod=Terminator with 2x barlow.astrobin:http://www.astrobin.com/189700/cheers
    2 points
  34. ahhh but you forget the dreaded 'astro' link with it's auto 4x cost calculator
    2 points
  35. Thanks Carole I have tried a few frames and, using my flatfield panel (with an ND filter over the panel), I am finding that an exposure of 1.3 seconds gives a White ADU value of ~22500. I assume that is close enough? Steve
    2 points
  36. not to stick my head above the parapet but I work for Andor, and I can confirm that so far as full frame architecture is concerned it's about how the pixels are stored/read out of the chip. Andy Mitchell's description is spot on. Now if only i can get my boss to let me take one of the expensive cameras home with me for.... testing...
    2 points
  37. Being a budget observer myself I understand your situation. About 80% of my eyepiece collection I bought second-hand. Always buy what you can afford. If the ES82s are out of your budget get the Explorers or Celestron X-Cel LXs. As a general recommendation, buy the best eyepiece you can afford with the widest FOV for exit pupil of 2mm (11-13mm in your case), it’s top priority, IMO. The second priority would be high magnification eyepiece. A low power wide angle eyepiece would be the third priority. Actually, you need 3 eyepieces and a Barlow. Barlow isn’t the luxury it’s the way to save mon
    2 points
  38. Having just spent £200 on a used 80mm triplet I'd be surprised if you'd beat it's performance with e.g. am 80mm ST and a filter albeit at a small saving. Having done both, personally I'd honestly save a bit more/wait a bit longer and buy a small ED/APO. This will provide sharper views at higher power for sure.
    2 points
  39. isnt it amazing the differences of the same object -i know beauty is in the eyes of the beholder but this is like looking through the eyes of other beholders. great images from all.
    2 points
  40. Very nice images Don! I was particularly impressed with the large collection that you posted on the CN gallery track http://www.cloudynights.com/topic/144516-astro-video-image-gallery/?p=6650144. Regarding Richard's question, I can say only the following. I have only the color Lodestar x2c and have had no chance to directly compare mono and color. But to tell the truth, I have never been fully satisfied with my single frame captures or sum stacks from my color LS. The texture is just not smooth enough for my taste. They look like close up views of the facial skin of a pretty actress without
    2 points
  41. Great effort buddy, and good to speak to you earlier you certainly sound like you have a renewed steel in your mind to defeat this beast of a mirror and bring it back under your control... You CAN tame it (sorry going all Ron there for a minute)! However it is great to sense that your determination has come back with a vengeance though Damian and we are all willing you on. Good luck mate.
    2 points
  42. Here is my m27 from last October. Binned 3x3 using DSS. Processed in Pixinsight and Photoshop. 1600 ISO with an at the time unmodded Canon t3i.
    2 points
  43. Astronomical Euipment were big time players during their business years. All of the instruments and mounts depicted in the brochure were made, some in considerable numbers. I think it would be fair to say that their optics shaded the engineering when it came to accolades. The optical side of the business was spearheaded by Jim Hysom, a renowned optician by any standard, the engineering by his late brother Rob Hysom. The two parts of the business separated to become AE Optics and AE Engineering (not to be confused with AE Astro Engineering). AE Optics finally moved to the Cambridge area, gradua
    2 points
  44. I like Baader VIP barlow, besides the excellent optical quality, it's very flexible, can be used with different barlow effect, as long as the 1.25" nosepiece is in the optical chain. 1.63x for eyepiece with T2 thread can be used in 2" focuser just like using a normal 2" eyepiece: My maximum 2.63x can be achieved with eyepiece top less than 16cm above 2" eyepiece holder:
    2 points
  45. Imitate the action of the tiger, stiffen the sinews, summon up the blood, Richard
    2 points
  46. Cheers guys I have finished today by Re cutting the lap channels and it's now sat on the mirror atop grease proof paper. The lap will need to be pressed with just cerium on the mirror to take the full profile. I am still in two minds what to do on the polishing front but will decide in the next couple of days. As Ron quite rightly says the velvety surface is nice to see, I will probably give it another hour or two with the 600 aluminium oxide but at present it is scratch free so I need to be extra careful putting the tool back on. I may get a bit of time on it tomorrow Damian
    2 points
  47. Using a seat at the eyepiece is a big help - and having a right angled finder saves neck strain. Getting comfy and relaxed makes a big difference when looking through the scope. Ensuring your eyes are fully dark adapted is a great aid, and so too is keeping both eyes open (use an eye patch as suggested above if required). It's such an "unnatural" hobby in many ways and can be disorientating - it does take practice - and your experience is typical of someone new to practical astronomy. But don't worry it will come in time as you learn.
    2 points
  48. cracking star colours there matt
    2 points
  49. M27 The Dumbbell Nebula And in H-a HA Stack
    2 points
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