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Showing content with the highest reputation on 23/11/14 in all areas

  1. Years ago in one of my first astronomy books I read that this cluster is now known to be ploughing through some interstellar gas and dust - and the book (now lost) had a picture showing the streaming 'wake' behind the stars as proof. Trying to bring this evidence of motion out in my own picture has become an obsession so whenever guests want to image the region I add new data to what I already have and push it even harder in processing. A couple of nights ago with SGL member Sandancer we captured a further 6.5 hours or so in the dual rig. Great! I don't know how much is in here altogether but
    6 points
  2. Wow been a while for me. Have to figure out how to process images again. I finally got some time to grab some photons this is M42 with HA RGB 8hrs in HA 20min subs then 30x5 mins in each RGB equipment Tak 106 and Fli 16803 on the paramount MX. Like I said I have to go back over my processing http://www.pbase.com/t_total123/image/158321745 Les
    6 points
  3. dont think she really go into it though
    5 points
  4. Hi, Solar imaging sessions appear to be like buses, nothing for ages then along come two. The cloud cleared about 1pm today but the seeing was rubbish again. Still you have to go with what you can at this time of the year and it was marginally better than yesterday and a whole heap better than nothing at all. Again my trusty Lunt 60 DS and ASI120MM-S made the best of it, a 12 pane mosaic and a few close ups (to follow). Robin
    5 points
  5. The last three nights have been really clear and surprisingly warm 13-14 degC at midnight. Unfortunately my attempts at M42 and M45 have not been so brilliant. The first two nights wasted due to my rubbish polar alignment. Last night I think I nailed it (more or less) and an hour on each has given me something to work on. Here is my first stack of M42 which I am quite pleased with, all comments welcome.
    5 points
  6. M27 in Ha and OIII. 20 x 10 min Ha, 9 x 10 min OIII. Have some RGB for the stars but they will have to wait. Equipment listed below.
    4 points
  7. Captured over two nights in Ha. Altair Astro CF RC8, Atik 383L+ mono and Baader 7nm Ha NB filter on Avalon Linear mount. I used Maxim for the capture and guiding for this, PI for processing. Hope you like
    4 points
  8. Mrs L looking proud at number 2 son's graduation ceremony. A proud moment as he graduated as a Doctor (but don't ask him about your bad back it was in Physics!) He studied for this while also working full time and being the father of four kids!
    4 points
  9. Here is one 15 min exposure of C27 Crescent Nebula in Ha.....
    4 points
  10. Got my fix today, after too long under cloud. He's magnificent! West limb: two large proms, one on SW massive and sprawling, the other more perpendicular but still beefy. North: one beautiful wispy detached prom and lots of even hazier activity around it, as well as several smaller proms spiking out. East: another gorgeous detached prom wisping off into space plus a couple of smaller 'spikes'. South: more small proms, with a trailing wisp from the massive prom on the SW spreading above them. Plenty of filaments and granulation to be seen on the face and, of course, the two largest sunspot grou
    4 points
  11. The main SGL10 days are 19th, 20th and 21st March 2015. The week leading up to the main dates will also be bookable. Online bookings will go live on the 1st December in the morning. We are still waiting to confirm some details hence the delay in announcing the dates but we will post more news in the coming weeks. Cheers, Grant
    3 points
  12. Rain, rain and more rain. What a way to run a country.... I'm feeding my solar addiction by searching through old files. Here are some frames from the big prom on 9th November. The first long frame was captured at 12.51 UK time, then there's a run of 11 frames taken over 4 minutes from 13.06 to 13.10 , then 2 frames captured as the Sun was low in the sky much later at 15.01 and 15.02. It's not much but it's all I've got left. The BBC is promising Sun tomorrow morning so fingers crossed, but I've been lied to before!
    3 points
  13. Like a lot of you I know, it has been a long time since many of the UK based imagers have posted anything worth posting on here because of the awful weather! To those of you that have managed anything keep up the great work because it keeps the thread alive! I thought it a good idea to post my favourite images up from the last Jupiter and Mars apparitions in the hope that others may follow to keep the post interesting at least till the conditions become more suitable! Seeing was great on these nights here and I hope that we can all get a few nights like this! Jupiter was taken on the 17th Janu
    3 points
  14. Here is one 15min sub of Caldwell 27 Crescent nen in HA.
    3 points
  15. Well here guys is 1x25s exposure of the Milkyway tonight from Galloway Star Party.
    3 points
  16. How do you know this without actually trying it, rather than just simulating it ?. My most used planetary eyepiece with my 12" dob is my Ethos 6mm. Believe me, Jupiter does not look in any way "pathetic" with it !
    3 points
  17. All things being equal (though they may not be!) it surely has to be north. Anything obscured below Polaris will, at some point, rise above it. All my imaging projects begin roughly in the east since this gives the longest opportunity. Many roll offs have just the roof rolling but, because I have good horizons, all mine have rolling upper-sides-and-roof plus a drop down flap at the end opposite the rolled off direction. This isn't difficult to contrive. We've done it in both steel and timber. Olly Or... or even very big... Olly
    3 points
  18. It's all clearing for Tomoz night but shame Damian heading home luckily I'm flying the WADAS flag. Got a few interested in coming to a meeting.
    3 points
  19. In theory I have two lovely planetary scopes. I say in theory only because I've yet to have decent views due to either weather or planetary position. The scopes? Vixen 150ED F9 refractor. Lovely crisp and contrasty views. 12" Orion Optics f6, 1/10th wave with a 50mm secondary ie sub 3% by area. As a brief summary I would say that the refractor gives more pleasing views to my eyes, but the 12" clearly has more resolution and shows more detail. I agree with the previous comments though, any decent scope with good contrast and resolution has the potential to show lovely planetary images. I can vo
    3 points
  20. You won't find people on sgl who will rubbish someone's scope because it's inexpensive. In fact people on this site use their expertise to enable people with low end equipment to get the best out of it. This is what sets sgl above a lot of specialist sites where point scoring and confrontation seem to be the norm.
    3 points
  21. Hello everyone This is my first attempt at posting an image - hopefully I won't botch it up totally... this is an image I took last spring (March 29, 2014) of NGC 2841. It is classified as an unbarred spiral galaxy, resides in Ursa Major and has a history of supernovae explosions, the most recent happening in 1999. Exposure data: Vixen VC200L @ f/6.4 (1280mm), Atik 460ex mono. L:R:G:B = 180m:54m:54m:54M (color bin 2x2). A larger version can be seen here: http://www.meadowlarkridgeobservatory.com/ngc-2841/ Critiques welcome and thank you for looking.
    2 points
  22. Ho hum, the weekend looks rubbish again. At least I grabbed some images during solar luncheon at work earlier in the week, despite the long-term dismal weather forecast at the start of the week! A few gaps in the right places, it's nice when it works that way. These two were from Tuesday and Wednesday. Michael mentioned in one of his observing reports that there was a bear paw on the Sun. Sounds about right to me --- 18th-19th November, 2014 Tele Vue 60, Lunt 1.25" Herschel Wedge, 1.6x Barlow, Solar Continuum filter, UV/IR cut filter, Grasshopper 3 (ICX687) camera
    2 points
  23. I had loads of guiding problems and random hassle, plus I trod muck through the lounge managed to get a few images to try out my new lens Atik 428 OSC
    2 points
  24. Already shot an hour in RGB not got enough filter room for rest of narrowband but this will do for first light. Also shooting widefield Milkyway. Cygnus at 70mm. Orion at 70mm hoping to catch Banards loop. Also nxt target with ccd is horse and flame Neb.
    2 points
  25. OMG what a sight tonight. Watch this space. Images gonna be stunning.
    2 points
  26. How about a set of proper tube rings, Telescope service stock a set of 76mm rings, these fitted to a dovetail bar would make a classic and secure mounting platform http://www.teleskop-express.de/shop/product_info.php/info/p981_Orion-Cradle-Rings---Aluminium---for-Tubes-with-diameter-76mm.html
    2 points
  27. We had a spell here in the Welsh mountains during 2010 where the temperature dropped well into the -20's. I recall the low temperatures did wonders for reducing dark noise in my DSLR's!! The local waterfall (130 feet drop) froze solid.
    2 points
  28. Not a problem buddy, we all ramble when we get caught in the moment. Nothing like seeing the wonders of the universe with eyeball mk1s
    2 points
  29. At last a Clear crisp night, 8 hours of my life well spent under the night sky at my cabin. Haven't seen a single star since last time i visited this section:
    2 points
  30. I left camp in sunny skies at 1pm for the 230 mile journey home to yorkshire. Apart from encountering a heavy down pour near dumfries the skies all the way were crystal clear all the way down back to barnsley. Shame I couldn't stay due to work tomorrow but to all those dedicated astronomers that have attended to support this through the dull days they were not wasted, with friendships made and renewed, laugh's a plenty and more experience gained. To the lucky lot that are still there I hope the skies stay clear all night. Now I've unpacked the car I'm planning for kielder next weekend but I w
    2 points
  31. Yeah, Autumn, Winter, and Spring.
    2 points
  32. -38c or so. At times these cold fronts provide some stunning DSO views, the sky seems cleaned, giving excellent transparency. One wrong move and the eyepiece frosts up though, you find out fast which ones last the longest.
    2 points
  33. Double-stacked cloud filter worked fine , was just the double-stacked umbrellas that hampered the view ...
    2 points
  34. I think it depends on the observing location as much as the telescope design. Last April I had unbelievable views of Jupiter from a very cold Yorks Dale, seeing and steadiness were A1. Using a humble 90mm achromat, I counted 7 bands on Jupiter. Turning to Mars, which was low, the main features such as Syrtis Major and the polar caps could clearly be seen. I was just gutted that I did not take the larger Newtonian. Its now my belief that even if you have a so called Planet Killer, you may only realise its potential just a few times under UK skies. God, that's pessimistic isn't it!
    2 points
  35. I have played around with A-focal a fair bit over the years, and still enjoy it, i have a lovely Lumix i wanted to do this mod to but its way to good, so i picked up this little Kodak of the bay for about a fiver, ideal for the job as its so small and light, and having owned one of these in the past i have used them on A-focal before and they are ok, in fact pretty good. So as you can see the holder is made from card loo roll tube, cut to size and laminated up to give strength using PVA glue, its made to fit over a 20mm plossl, these old smoothside skywatcher ones are top for the job, then tri
    2 points
  36. Thanks Blazar. Just for fun, here is a sneaky preview of PIPP running under OS X: Cheers, Chris
    2 points
  37. I think that some of the legends about best planetary performance come from experienced observers with high quality scopes at altitude in excellent conditions (often in the states). In these circumstances the extremely subtle differences of the most optimum eyepieces for planetary observing will naturally present themselves. For the average observer with a standard albeit decent scope and cheap but decent eyepieces sat in their urban garden with average seeing any feasible features will be apparent with patience
    2 points
  38. I think DST's have introduced more to astronomy than put off. Its peoples expectations that end up putting them off. Most peope on here over 50 and interested since a kid would have had a cheap tasco , other than bad CA and the wobbles it gave good service and it taught you important things ... Back then we did not have the internet , we had books and word of mouth and the first view of Saturn in this rubbish telescope that wobbled if you exhaled and showed so much false colour was simply fantastic and fuled an interest for life. Cheap scopes and bino's in general do a fantastic job for the m
    2 points
  39. I was lucky. Some very nice neighbors gave me a 2" refractor when I was 12. I already loved astronomy and other sciences, and that little Japanese scope was great! Many nights were passed on the roof of my house. From there I did my homework and begged a 3" F/15 refractor from my parents for Christmas. In 1972 - that was pretty good for a kid. My neighbor had worked for the Space Program in Houston. One of the people why talked to astronauts orbiting Earth, so he knew a great deal. So I'll sign this with my advice passed up the line..... Give Telescopes to Kids, Dave
    2 points
  40. Aye, I don't think one type of scope can lay claim to being the best for planetary viewing. It makes reasonable sense to assume that each scope type (Newt, Frac, Cassegrain, Maksutov etc) will throw up those that do an outstanding job, those that do okay and those that will be rather lacking. I imagine a well collimated, relatively smallish central obstruction, longish f/ratio 8"+ and bigger Newt would be an outstanding planetary scope. So too would be an 8"+ and bigger Cassegrain type per se. On the frac front, one would probably get outstanding results with a 6"+ and bigger, f8 and longer Ap
    2 points
  41. So far I think we have had almost every design of scope recommended for planetary viewing, except (so far) fast achromatic refractors. Perhaps there isn't such a thing as a "planetary scope" these days ?
    2 points
  42. No, he means NLO - Norman Lockyer Observatory (link)
    2 points
  43. Another point in favour of the north opening roof is that you can often operate with the roof partially closed. Seeing or imaging anything from the zenith to the southern horizon is possible with the roof only just over half open (assuming your pier is central!). This can be beneficial to keep both wind and light pollution under some control. I also find that it limits the amount of dewing problems that I have - anything under the roof is far less likely to dew up.
    2 points
  44. and here is M45, can't compete with Olly's but it's a start
    2 points
  45. I think the main reason people stop using the scopes is false expectation. People see magnificent pictures of nebulas and think "Hey, I get a scope and I can see all this..." Then they look through the scope and see stars, more stars than usual but still stars. The moon looks great, even through a cheap scope, planets are still OK - not as good as on the box, but seeing the rings of Saturn for the first time is a thrill. Nebulas are a no-show. After a while you have seen what's there to see and you loose interest. I had a scope since I was a teenager but only now that I have a camera which can
    2 points
  46. The things that turn people off astronomy seem to amount to the following: A difference between what they expect (having seen stunning images and animations) and what they can actually seeThe realisation that it's almost always cloudy in the UK. A fact I had not appreciated until I started, eitherThe cost of high-end gearA technical inabillity to set up even simple equipment satisfactorilyBoredom: done the Moon, done Jupiter, done Saturn, done Mars. Everything else is just a fuzzy blob.I would also suggest that the quality of cheap gear is much better than what was sold to "serious" amateurs b
    2 points
  47. Another one from the challenging night of the 13th 245mm Orion Newt
    2 points
  48. It's a real shame that many of the people offering their advice have never actually looked through the product in question. Seben have been a budget brand and have perhaps been a victim of offering a cheap products in the past but brand name do develop and can go on to produce some good products. Think - Skoda / Kia / Hyundai - 15 years ago these were a joke but now have a solid reputation for building good cars. Its a shame that some people can't get beyond this yet are in the front of the queue when handing out the advice. And yes, I have one of these and its pretty good - sure I could pay 1
    2 points
  49. Of course I'll sleep! Mind you if the sun's looking good, it'll be a short nap between sundown and astrodark ... And I'll be happy, happy, happy when I'm sleep-deprived! But tomorrow will be cloudy again - so that's enough of this gay abandon and madness ...
    1 point
  50. More for the pot (IC1396): Source thread here: http://stargazerslounge.com/topic/218053-elephant-trunk-in-ha-130pds/
    1 point
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