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Showing content with the highest reputation on 22/11/14 in all areas

  1. Years ago in one of my first astronomy books I read that this cluster is now known to be ploughing through some interstellar gas and dust - and the book (now lost) had a picture showing the streaming 'wake' behind the stars as proof. Trying to bring this evidence of motion out in my own picture has become an obsession so whenever guests want to image the region I add new data to what I already have and push it even harder in processing. A couple of nights ago with SGL member Sandancer we captured a further 6.5 hours or so in the dual rig. Great! I don't know how much is in here altogether but
    8 points
  2. Hello! This is NGC 253, a very nice galaxy in Sculptor. GSO 12" F/5 Canon Rebel XS 65x30" unguided http://www.astrobin.com/136479/ Cheers
    7 points
  3. Hi, The dreaded Work and Weather are getting in the way for me to get any solar imaging this month, so imagine my surprise when it was nice and clear over Saturday lunch time, especially as I have been at work this morning and a builder was coming round early afternoon. Sadly the seeing was pants, it was just one boiling mass, but my trusty Lunt 60 DS, ASI120MM made a good fist of it to pull out this 12 pane mosaic. I had to use rather more sharpening than normal and you can still see a little banding but it was a lot better than nothing. I have a few close ups, not sure if they will come out
    4 points
  4. Greetings from Leeds. This is my first post on SGL so by way of introduction this is my newest image I took earlier this year (not had time since ), Its comet C/2012 K1 (Pan-STARRS) in Ursa Major - (hope this link works) - details are in the link
    4 points
  5. Hiya Shane, John Wilkinson's New Eyes on the Sun is very nice introduction to general solar phenomena. Wilkinson covers the most prominent solar topics such as photosphere, chromosphere and corona activity, eclipses and transits, space weather, and there's even a chapter on basic observing in white light, H-alpha and CAK. Each chapter is explained in an easy manner and should answer many of the typical questions that arise from the solar observer without going into any mathematical or technical detail. Wilkinson's book is aimed at the general observer who would like to know a little more about
    4 points
  6. The main SGL10 days are 19th, 20th and 21st March 2015. The week leading up to the main dates will also be bookable. Online bookings will go live on the 1st December in the morning. We are still waiting to confirm some details hence the delay in announcing the dates but we will post more news in the coming weeks. Cheers, Grant
    3 points
  7. Hello! This is my try at the comet K1 Panstarrs. It was amazing seeing it moving amongs the background stars in horologium constelation! GSO 12" F/5 Canon Rebel XS 27x30s http://www.astrobin.com/136751/ Cheers
    3 points
  8. Not much happening in the way of capturing any new data with the current weather so still working through runs from the 15th. Its good practice though (and I needed it) and I have spent much time these last few evenings trying to get back to a regime I feel happy with. This image was the second to last of the session. Pete
    3 points
  9. Here are the first resutls from the modified 130PDS, which has been converted to all threaded connections and an internally housed corrector. I haven't quite got the spacing right yet (need to lose 1mm) so the stars arent quite 100% perfect towards the corners, but its not far behind what the 80ED used to deliver in terms of flatness. Just a wee tweak and it should be perfect. Once I receive the T2-M48 male adaptor it will open up threaded collimation too, so im expecting that to contribute towards the overall result. The unintended side effect of being slighly over is that spacing distance is
    3 points
  10. Aye, I don't think one type of scope can lay claim to being the best for planetary viewing. It makes reasonable sense to assume that each scope type (Newt, Frac, Cassegrain, Maksutov etc) will throw up those that do an outstanding job, those that do okay and those that will be rather lacking. I imagine a well collimated, relatively smallish central obstruction, longish f/ratio 8"+ and bigger Newt would be an outstanding planetary scope. So too would be an 8"+ and bigger Cassegrain type per se. On the frac front, one would probably get outstanding results with a 6"+ and bigger, f8 and longer Ap
    3 points
  11. I am surprised that this one seems to my eyes have come out okay, the seeing was pretty bad when I took this shot, so I stacked fewer frames than normal and it seems to have made it out the other side better than I was expecting. The seeing got worse and worse and after a few grabs I got the eyepiece onto it so I could see the spot directly in its full glory. It was just a fuzzy black blob by then. Amazing how quickly the seeing can fall off, from poor to pointless in a few minutes! Thankfully I got a brief but much better view in the next day! Oh, and I have been moaning lately about having
    3 points
  12. Must be getting bad, read the title, knew what you meant but still had the thought: "We don't need a spell for clouds, we need a spell for clear!" :rolleyes:
    3 points
  13. Hello! This is ma latest atempt at the flame nebula, in Orion GSO 12" F/5 Canon Rebel XS 7x60" unguided http://www.astrobin.com/136492/ Cheers
    3 points
  14. I had a set of osc data taken with a modded Canon and a 150 PDS as it's first outing sometime ago so the scope was uncollimated and had all sorts of issues. I also found some Ha data taken with an Atik 314L+ and a Zenithstar 71 @ F4.7 last year. I just combined them and did a bit of play in PS. Nothing to write home about but it beats getting mad because of this weather, just for fun. The osc data is quite weak in the blue for some reason and the stars are horrble. I think the osc data was 16 X 180s and have no idea what the Ha was for sure. A.G
    3 points
  15. Picked this up used,and in really mint condition,and every thing working as it should........apart from the cloud blaster it came with A lovely LX 200 8".
    2 points
  16. What is movement of lunar libration? The mvimento of libration is due to non-perfect synchronization of motion of rotation and revolution of the moon that allows us to see around 9% of the lunar surface (the boundary zone of the hidden face) opposite the Earth, which is invisible when observing the Moon our position on Earth. The libration occurs due to displacement (sway), real or apparent, of the lunar axis in relation to their average positions. Therefore this '' staggering '' Moon allows us to see 59% of its surface at certain times. These moments of maximum libration that alternate betwee
    2 points
  17. Just to let everyone know my USB Telescope webcam works fine in my 127EQ, it must of been a focus issue. Thanks for the info!
    2 points
  18. You won't find people on sgl who will rubbish someone's scope because it's inexpensive. In fact people on this site use their expertise to enable people with low end equipment to get the best out of it. This is what sets sgl above a lot of specialist sites where point scoring and confrontation seem to be the norm.
    2 points
  19. I agree John perhaps the notion of 'best for planetary' comes from the days when we were less awash with wonderful options at a reasonably accessible price point?
    2 points
  20. So far I think we have had almost every design of scope recommended for planetary viewing, except (so far) fast achromatic refractors. Perhaps there isn't such a thing as a "planetary scope" these days ?
    2 points
  21. Not really a DIY project,but just an assembly of scopes and camera,s. I have been operating a 2 scope rig,for some time now,with reasonable success,but have now decided to up the stakes and go for 3 scopes. The scopes I have are 2 Celestron ED80 F7.5s & a William Optics ZS66 F6. My cameras are fairly old Starlight models,being 2 HX916s and 1 MX916. If my calcs are correct the HX916 camera,s coupled to the ED80 scopes,and incorporating a x0.6 Reducer,then binned at 2x2 should give me an image size of 696x520 pixels,and a FOV of 1.29x0.96 Degrees. The WO scope is left at its normal Focal len
    2 points
  22. Been horrible for more than two weeks now. Have my fingers crossed for at least a glimpse tomorrow ...
    2 points
  23. Weather was torrential at times last night and I finally retired at 4am after plenty of laughs in the warm room. This morning is broken cloud, but a few are out trying some solar viewing and imaging. Looking at a Pan I left outside it has an inch of water in so obviously soaked the place quite a bit! My tent held up but a couple had major issues with water. Fingers crossed for tonight for everyone. Damian
    2 points
  24. hgjievans.........hi, It makes no difference to Star hopping having a RACI or Telrad fitted to your telescope when your eye is at the eyepiece whilst viewing. What does make a difference is practice, practice.practice. It will at some stage almost become second nature when you have it right. There are no magical tricks or shortcuts. Just go out one night without the intention of looking at planet 'X' or star 'Y' and just study for example Polaris, which should stay in the viewfinder without any effort, then just play about moving too and away from the target with the telescope. Go to a wide
    2 points
  25. Tony's suggestion is on my xmas list
    2 points
  26. mike that's true but on the other hand lots of us have got time off over the christmas period so it may be worth posting short notice meets as and when the conditions prevail and if that's not a go perhaps it's a case of anyone who is available or fancies an evening out over the christmas period just post for an unofficial short notice night out and finds out if there's any company available.
    2 points
  27. HEre is a video I made from the subs (they are cropped) to show the movement. Each frame (the first half, darker ones) are 30 secons exposures, the rest are 60 seconds (you can see when the comet seems to accelerate): Cheers
    2 points
  28. If you use a star atlas, a properly aligned EQ mount will move the same way as the atlas grid lines. Turning the RA knob clockwise will move you to the right on your map, turning the DEC knob will move you up or down on the map (I still can't work out which way, so just turn the know and see which way the scope moves). If you use Stellarium you can put it into EQ mode and practice these moves. For example, start at Mirach (naked eye visible) and move up (DEC) by half a finderscope view and forward (RA) by the same amount and you will have Mu-And. Do the same moves again and you will have M3
    2 points
  29. Cheers Simon and Simmo39. Thanks Stuart, yes I agree. It's all the hours staring at this screen that does it!! I think this is a better tone but it's always tricky when it comes to colour, brightness etc due to variation in displays.
    2 points
  30. It's towards Sagittarius. You can see the central bulge in the middle of this 360 degree panorama, the Milky Way is noticeably thicker here. We have limited opportunities to view the galactic centre from the northern hemisphere, I'm not quite sure how much of the centre we can see from the UK. I took this shot with a kit lens at 17mm at the end of August. Matching it up with the panorama above I captured the left hand edge of the bulge, the centre would have been at or a little way below the horizon.
    2 points
  31. Honesty compels me to admit that this dark time has been very disappointing. Remember that we have our own time machine here so 6+ hours doesn't take 6+ hours! lly
    2 points
  32. I got rid of my Explore Scientific 100 degree EPs, I like the Televues better in my Dobs. I tend to use the 10mm Ethos and Paracorr II most of the time. The cases were made by Ron Burrows at Wood Wonders in the US http://www.wood-wonders.com/
    2 points
  33. 200mm is excellent for M45. I used it to go after the two extended arms of reflection nebulosity. Focal length dtermines field of view but not the depth to which you can reach. This comes above all with time. Olly
    2 points
  34. Following on the recent plane theme, I remember this flashing past the other day, just taken me an hour to find it Dave
    1 point
  35. I think its a great improvement. I have one on my ST80 and love it.
    1 point
  36. I think plossls are often underrated and underestimated. I love them and have five in my case. They match my Naglers in all but field.
    1 point
  37. Thanks guys, you try your best. The weather hasn't been on my side either, but I am so busy at work that everything else has taken a back seat for the last few weeks, so it is good if you get a lucky break. The conditions weren't really up to it, but here are the close ups.... Robin
    1 point
  38. He had a pair of binoculars they shared for a while... until I gave them a second pair earlier this year. But, they mostly use them for bird-watching during the day. That is a helpful hint I will pass along: to let the telescope "adjust" to the outside temperatures before use for better viewing. While waiting, they can use their binoculars to locate their targets.
    1 point
  39. Burke by name, not by nature! Its a big learning curve when dealing with telescopes, but you must be happier now, knowing how to access the internals, should the situation ever arise again, although next time with caution? Its usually one of the ends that will come away happily without any loss of the fittings. well done anyway.
    1 point
  40. Will try to change some plans and attend
    1 point
  41. Hopefully it's clear the wind has dropped all set up now for some imaging just need polar aligning amd away we go. Last night sleep was disrupted slightly by thr very high wind and rain. At times it was like how I imagine sitting a top of a Saturn 5 rocket would be like :-)
    1 point
  42. Sun and Monday is looking good it is sods law I shall be out with the dob probably take it up the mountain somewhere
    1 point
  43. Thats mainly why I used a 9V battery to power the nano and stepper. I may switch to 12V in the future - the controller board will take 5 to 12V according to the spec.
    1 point
  44. Right now I'd be pleased to be able to see as much as contrails. I don't think I've seen more than a fleeting glimpse of blue sky in a month or more We should however perhaps be happy with things as they are. After all, when fossil fuels become scarce and they have to move to electric aeroplanes the contrails will be nothing compared to all the extension leads running everywhere... James
    1 point
  45. Layers! You need a hard stretch for the faint stuff and softer stretches for the bright stellar cores. I still feel I could get mine better in this respect and will chip away at it. Olly
    1 point
  46. This is my final collection, my wife's words........
    1 point
  47. Up early today for an astronomical treat. I witnessed my first ever shadow transit on Jupiter. This is NOT my photo I hasten to add, but I just posted to show approximately what I saw through the eyepiece. It's really was a lovely sight. What's missing in this photo is all four Galilean moons which were suspended around the Jupiter in the eyepiece of my telescope, and which really framed the planet beautifully.
    1 point
  48. Hello and welcome to the forum. Identifying the scope is important so you get correct advice about how to sort the issue. There are many different designs around you see. Is your scope the one that is covered by the review in this link ? http://www.astromart.com/articles/article.asp?article_id=441 If so, you will need to remove the optical glass window at the front end of the scope. The screws to do this are the ones that face forward. They should loosen a ring which in turn holds the optical window in place. Make of note of it's orientation as it needs to go back in exactly the same way. Once
    1 point
  49. Following a talk at my local astro group on dark sky portable AP, I called IO Astronomy a few weeks ago, for some advice on portable mounts suitable for dslr work and for use with a small refractor. I was looking for something compact, lightweight, and easily transportable – for holidays, and impromptu grab-&-go trips to darker skies. I spoke to Dave Woods at some length, and his advice made logical and economic sense. I therefore visited the company’s showroom in Hampshire a few days later, to have a look at the various options in the flesh. Dave gave me a tour of their showroom, and s
    1 point
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