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Showing content with the highest reputation on 31/07/14 in all areas

  1. I've mainly just been a visual observer and mainly with the mark 1 eyeball but a few months back i got a skytracker v2 and after a few widefields i decided to get a cheapy 200mm lense and have a go at m31 from my light polluted garden. Its nothing compared to the m31s ive been looking at on this forum they are truely amazing and hopefully one day i'll get something 1/4 as good as them, But non the less its my first dso image and i couldnt be happier (although it does look very blue) Is it wrong that i enjoy the processing part more than the observing 50x95s subs + calibration frames Skytra
    5 points
  2. Worth taking look at this pair (sometimes twinned with 23 Aquilae in terms of difficulty) as it is quite pretty. Said to be a bit easier than 23 Aquilae despite the mag difference because of the high altitude at the moment. The components are listed at mags 5.3 and 9.1, sep about 3.7 arcsec, with a PA close to 290 degrees (from Sissy H). Although visible with my ED80 at x150, the separation was poor - much better with the Mak at x200 and x250, where the secondary is a bright point just outside the bright diffraction ring of the primary, nearly due W of the primary (there is another star in t
    3 points
  3. Had a lovely run of clear skies night last week and captured plenty of data to practise my processing skills on, and took various test shots with different lenses. Here's a quick process of my first proper run on Andromeda: It's a crop of an image taken with my 50mm lens. As I was going to crop it down anyway I was less concerned about coma so I opened up the aperture a bit more. At f3.2 looking at the liveview I seemed to be getting chromatic aberration on the brighter stars, so I backed off to f3.5. Looking at the full frame the corners aren't bad, so I'm going to stick with f3.5 for my nex
    3 points
  4. I'm fresh back from a lovely holiday in sunny Dorset, but it was great to get back home so I could use my 120mm scope with the Quark For the Quark's tuning for these shots, I tried four clicks clockwise from the centre position instead of my usual two, having played around with the tuning while on hols with my 60mm scope and Quark. Whether the two scopes should have the same, I don't know, but here are the shots. For all images I took 1700 frames (about a minute's worth with my camera) and stacked around 25% of them using Autostakkert 2. I hope to post some of my solar shots from my h
    3 points
  5. Hey Folks, all excited because my new kit has just arrived. So had to share with you all. On Holiday next week , so really hoping for some clear skies.... But we all know what's going to happen. Cloud,Rain,cloud.
    3 points
  6. No! it's a mega cosmic ray hit Whilst taking a set of darks I got this beauty (?), now I've seen a lot of cosmic ray hits - dim, short traces but nothing like this before. Maybe it just happened to hit exactly along the plane of the sensor but the energy in this thing is phenomenal. ChrisH
    3 points
  7. Clear this morning and the Sun is looking particularly spotty!!
    3 points
  8. Ages since I have posted an image, but after only managing about 15 hours imaging all last Autumn/Winter/Spring due to a combination of equipment failures and awful weather, I am delighted to have managed 14 hours last week alone, before the end of July ! Two versions of this - a standard Hubble palette, and a first ever go for me at bi-color, for which I discarded the very weak SII data, and created a synthetic Green channel in PS. Not sure if I've overdone the colours on this or not, I see so many variations, opinions welcome ! Capture Details: Scope: Quattro 8CF Camera: QHY9 mono Mount: NE
    3 points
  9. Hi guys I managed to get out last night and capture 15 x 600 second subs of the bubble nebula. I am really pleased with the result. I think it might be a good idea to capture a set of longer subs to bring out the background nebula. Thanks for looking and all criticism is welcome
    3 points
  10. Despite their low altitude from London I always try to image some of the other planet's moons and did ok over the last two night to include Pluto in Sagittarius as it emerged from my neighbour's giant willow due south ! Pic + notes @ http://stargazerslounge.com/topic/221818-chasing-the-outer-lowly-moons/?p=2385655 but here's Pluto using last night LL v0.10 - not sure that I using it right but it ran faultlessly well done Paul. It didn't work in stacking mode on the other planetary fields as I assume too few stars to latch onto but a good job on Pluto in a rich starfield
    3 points
  11. Good day everybody, Last couple of weeks I have been working with my new 5nm Astrodon h-alpha filter, so I thought I would share some results. The filter is a very nice upgrade compared to the old 7nm Baader. The images have been made with my 10" f/3.8 newton and the trusted st8300 sbig ccd camera. Subexposures ranging from 15 min to 20 min. Almost no processing was done, only curves and levels in Photoshop and a bit of contrast enhancement. Some more data would be nice as I didn't use any noise reduction. The first one is Barnard 344; exposure 5.5 hours: Higher res here: http://www.astronomi
    3 points
  12. I'm giving my best to release a beta version of the APT auto-focusing somewhere in the next week
    3 points
  13. Greetings SGL members. It has been some time since I have posted any new film images. It is true that I have been having a fling with a mistress named DSLR, but my heart is in these images done in the way I learned thirty years ago. My last imaging session according to my Log book was October 11, 2012. I had just finished a roll of Superia that night and I almost never returned. I began experimenting with digital. It was fun and productive but I missed my old film images. I was delayed further about one year ago. Without warning I suffered a severe heart attack. It was quite the scene. I was a
    2 points
  14. This was data that I collected in 2012 (when I first started imaging)...or in other words the last time I have been able to get M31. I was hoping to revisit it last year but the weather wasn't right so I will keep reprocessing this data until the weather improves and allows me to capture some new data...so don't blame me, blame the weather gods... Unmodified Canon 7D with Canon 500mm f/4 L IS @ f/4, ISO 1600. Astrotrac TT320 mount. 60 x 60 second Lights 25 x Bias 25 x Darks 25 x Flats M31 - Andromeda Galaxy by StuartJPP, on Flickr
    2 points
  15. I never tire of photographing Plato and Vallis Alpes. In this particular photo had the opportunity to catch the Sun in extremely low angle which allowed me to record only the upper rim of Plato but stressed markedly Rima Coursing fund Vallis Alpes. With the sun at this time we can see how this region is extremely rugged.
    2 points
  16. The test between hi or not will be one that's going to be done at Dobfest ...report will follow
    2 points
  17. Looks in good nic when you consider its age. Funnily enough mine is the same colour. I'm now in the process of taking it apart and cleaning the wheels, tracks and whatnot. then paining it with MSP before putting it back together again. Always preferred the colour green for observatories - white looks horrible and sticks out like a sore whassiname!!
    2 points
  18. Got setup relatively early this morning and had some lovely crisp views once the sun cleared the neighbouring houses. Typically, a patch of light hazy cloud appeared once I started sketching which dimmed the view and knocked back the detail a bit but I don't think my sketching skills were up to capturing it all anyway! So, here is today's offering: Followed by an iPhone shot of the same area, using my SteadyPix holder which does help I must say. I took the shot using the ProCam app which allows better control, then tweaked it in an app called OneStop which allows some basic processing. Croppe
    2 points
  19. Taken with a PST, 2.5x powermate and ASI120MM camera. 250 frmaes stacked from 1000, with a flat subtracted in AS2!. I was not expecting too much imaging with the PST, but I am very pleasantly surprised!
    2 points
  20. No drama collecting the data - Everything is working perfectly together. 3 nights spent without losing any subs, this is how I like it. Looking at collecting some RGB for this, whether I can work out how to add RGB stars to NB images remains to be seen! Somewhat in your face, but that has ended up as something of my style!! All comments welcomed. The only reason there is a difference in the number of OIII subs is that I had to wait for the cloud to clear. Details M: Avalon Linear Fast Reverse T: Takahashi FSQ85 0.73x C: QSI690-wsg with 3nm NB filters 14x1800s Ha 13x1800s OIII 14x1800s SII - 20
    2 points
  21. 2 points
  22. When using FWHM there are two important things to consider; 1) The star must not be saturated, meaning it must not reach the highest brightness values your camera can record. So a bright star may easily be too bright. 2) Use exposures that are long enough to set the seeing (turbulence) average out a bit. I use three seconds. Less than this and the FWHM readings bounce around too much. Olly
    2 points
  23. If it's slow, bizarre and red it'll be a Routemaster bus.
    2 points
  24. Since your're mainly interested in Lunar and planetary work, I'd like to suggest Baader Classic Ortho(BCO) 10mm and Q 2.25x barlow here: http://www.firstlightoptics.com/baader-planetarium/baader-classic-ortho-bco-eyepiece.html http://www.firstlightoptics.com/baader-planetarium/baader-classic-q-225x-barlow.html This combination gives you effectively 10mm, 7.7mm and 4,4mm equivalent focal length. It should cover your viewing nice. Planetary work is more about having less scatter(bright flare around the object), better through-put, Abbe ortho are one of few most suitable designed EPs with these c
    2 points
  25. Deep Purple-for those of us of a certain age
    2 points
  26. Taken with SGLer Gedan using the twin Tak tandem/Mesu 200/Atik 11000 (Tom's) and SXVH36 (Yves'), this has 23.5 hours of data taken over three nights. Plus some high res overlays just for the Coccon itself from larger scopes. Ha 25x30 mins at 7Nm and 6x30 at 3Nm. Lum 17x15 RGB 5x15 per channel. This appraoch to the target was pioneered by Fabian Neyer, whom we salute! Seeing the dust lanes as foreground objects blew my socks off when I first saw his famous image. Ha was added to red and as luminance. The signal is very faint in Ha for the widefield even with 15.5 Hrs all in. The big processing
    1 point
  27. Apt is a great software, i highly recommend it. you can do pretty much everything with the free version, but i just bought the license key for the full version. can't wait to test the auto focusing as soon as the clouds break
    1 point
  28. My mount was third hand and it showed signs that it had been dropped in the past. The Polar scope end cap was broken when I bought it and it had a few chips on the back of the main body. The 10mm alt bolt thread stripped and I helicoiled 12mm thread and used 12mm bolts. When tightening the altitude bolt when drift aligning the whole thing went "wack" I have over 3000 hours Hanggliding and gliding have climbed all over the world but Astrophotography is the one that injured me (cut hand and bruising to the bone on my left hand) I saved my Telescope though
    1 point
  29. Hi every one, I managed to get out for a few hours last night to take advantage of another clear night. Having been inspired by some very nice shots of IC1396 / Elephant trunk, i decided to have a little dabble myself. It was all going together nicely until I went to try and get the focusing dialled in, Wow, talk about atmospheric disturbances, Normally when I focus using the FWHW method it fluctuates plus or minus 1 maybe 2 on a bad day, Last night where 6 is very good focus for me and 7 being the norm it was going from 6 to 12 on and off, all I could do is take the average and that took
    1 point
  30. Thanks, Robert. When using the 3.3, it's critical to get the spacing between the FR and the sensor correct. I am still studying this because I think mine may not be quite right yet. Also, make sure that your scope is precisely collimated. Here's a good procedure: http://www.astromart.com/articles/article.asp?article_id=548 The skies I can't help you with. Don
    1 point
  31. If you are using windows Infranview will give you temp as part of the the information for an image (click the information button then click EXIF), its a bit of a long winded way round but its there. Although I try to avoid it, if I do darks during daylight I tend to put the covers on then wrapin with some kitchen foil as well as well. I find light will leak through the covers if its bright enough. Don't forget if you are using a newt light will get in through the back of the scope around the primary mirror (and I have also found around the joint where the primary cell is attached to the scop
    1 point
  32. Hi Craig, As Cleetus mentioned Austin Roberts advertised in the BAA Journal in the 70's. If I've got it right, I've attached an image of their advert from the October 1976 journal. Cheers, Bob
    1 point
  33. Looks great, enjoy your new toy and tell us all about your first light.
    1 point
  34. Hi Tommohawk, I must admit I'm no imager - have no imaging set up - but it just maybe that the Cocoon (going from memory here so bare with me!!) has a very low surface brightness - M27 has a very high surface brightness and I think a lot more compact than the Cocoon - I've tried many times to hunt down the Cocoon visually with no luck at all, but M27 jumps out of the EP at me. The magnitude scale of brightness works from a single point of a light source so even if the object is brighter (according to the magnitude scale) if its over a larger area of sky - this makes the object much dimmer than
    1 point
  35. I can already see the clouds rolling in... You can't beat the excitement of getting a new box to open.
    1 point
  36. Some fun for all, hurrah ! http://www.deep-sky.co.uk/asterisms.htm Nick.
    1 point
  37. I think eyepieces are becoming quite hyped up these days with many features that people dont want , dont need and will never use but with clever marketing everyone gets hooked. Its like buying a car these days and paying extra for alloys wheels and metallic paint, neither are essential but marketing have out such things on a pedestal and called them luxuries that we cant live without. With eyepieces we are sold features we are told we must have. - A 120 degree field that I cant see, - argon or nitrogen in my eyepiece - waterproof to 100ft - 3inch fit Lots of gimmicks these days, becoming lik
    1 point
  38. Plough: Show son the pointers and how to find Polaris. Polaris should just about be visible but not the rest of Ursa Minor. Plough: Middle star of the handle is a double, easy to seperate in binoculars - Mizar+Alcor. Plough: Follow the handle round in a arc and you bump into a red star - Arcturus. Plough: The pointers again, go the other way and they point to Leo. Actually both sides of the plough point to Leo, Leo is where the 2 projected lines meet. May not be visible, just not sure. Casseiopia: It is a "W", the first "V" is shallow, second "V" is steep. Using the "steep" V as an arrow head
    1 point
  39. Strapped the QSI to my LX and decided to have a go at the Wizard Nebula in Hubble Palette as I had just received OIII & SII filters from Ian King. Conditions looked just about right last night so I was pleased to get everything working swiftly in order to maximise imaging time. The image is Ha @ 12 x 800s, OIII @ 6 x 300s bin 2 and SII @6 x 300s bin 2. I was sceptical if this would be enough subs to produce anything decent so I am more than happy with the end result. Regards, Pete
    1 point
  40. Might also be worth seeing if you can contact someone at Wimbleball Lake to see if you can just rock up and get going. They have occasional stargazing events there, but I have no idea what the deal is if you're just wanting to observe on your own. Could be a bit of a drag to get to if you're at Lynton though. Mind you, everywhere's a bit of a drag to get to from Lynton James
    1 point
  41. We camped in a Yurt near Challacombe last year and the skies on the second night were just phenomenal - some of the best I've seen in this hemisphere, including back home in the New Forest. That was the first time I saw M33 in my little ST80 - it's quite easy in skies like that. Unfortunately the skies on the first night decided to rain on us... constantly! That's Exmoor for you though! DD
    1 point
  42. Hi there and welcome to SGL
    1 point
  43. These are 4 renditions of M51, the Whirlpool Galaxy, designation NGC 5194, between Ursa Major and Canes Venatici, an interacting grand design spiral galaxy at approx. 20mil. light years. The image on the bottom left is a regular 2:45h integration time RGB (red green blue) image. On the right, split into its component channels, Luminance (black white, brightness) on top, channels ab (red green, blue yellow). I have purposely overprocessed the luminance channel in this pic, a more modest lum. chan went into the image.
    1 point
  44. Hello and welcome to the SGL
    1 point
  45. 1 point
  46. Don't overlook this smaller version of the a Dumbbell nebula. I'd forgotten all about it. As it came into view I thought that it was a nice galaxy ! Really bright and comes up with a UHC filter. Try the triple Cassiopeia cluster , in a line , NGC 663, NGC 664 (very fine) and NGC 659 (small core) . This season's trending object being NGC 6811, The "Hole cluster" in Cygnus. Still can't beat the floriferous dark laned NGC 7789 ( Caroline's Rose). Cygnus Along with NGC 6884 , a small x150 planetary nebula , one corner of a triangle. NGC 6833, smaller between a double and a single. NGC 6866 at
    1 point
  47. Prominence Quark has arrived... Comparison with Chromosphere version coming up ASAP! Good news is that the filter on this one also looks good, so am hoping it performs as well as the new Chromosphere model I received did yesterday, which was outstanding. No shadowing effect, no obvious sweet spot, just a whole lotta sweet sweet solar viewing Have mentioned in another thread that I tried it with BinoVue and 24 Pans yesterday... Wow! I could almost reach out and grab the filament on the eastern limb!!
    1 point
  48. Thanks for the warm welcome, everyone! :-)
    1 point
  49. http://www.timeanddate.com/sun/uk/edinburgh?month=8
    1 point
  50. IC1396 : 24 hours total, four panes, FSQ-85/460ex/Baader Ha and FSQ-106/H694/Astrodon Ha joint project with Velvet (Real thing is about A1 in size )
    1 point
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