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Showing content with the highest reputation on 19/03/14 in all areas

  1. Ladies and Gentlemen, I present for your viewing pleasure... the Rosette Nebula !! (12 of 19 lights, 255 secs at ISO800, darks, flats and bias, DSLR at prime focus, kit as per sig, Pixinsight processed) Quite a daunting target, most of the images out there on the internet are shot with CCD cameras with Ha and OIII, so naturally I thought I'd give it a go with my old noisy unmodded DSLR with a serious amp-glow issue. I couldn't actually see the nebulosity at all in the eyepiece or framing shots, but did manage to match the star cluster to pics on my laptop, so I thought I'd give it a go. I w
    11 points
  2. My second attempt at Mars and considerable improvement over the earlier image. Seeing was pretty torrid, capturing this around 24deg as I was a little impatient to get something before the clouds closed in for the night. Green and Red looked pretty good on this run, but blue was very soft/mushy. QHY5L-IIM @ 4500mm on SW Exp 200P.
    9 points
  3. Here is an image of Jupiter and Mars taken under reasonable seeing conditions last Saturday. Same image scale for comparison. regards Peter
    8 points
  4. The sky was not entirely clear and I hoped for a good seeing with the absence of winds, and in fact in the first half hour watching at the eyepiece was significantly better than the last attempts of this year 2014, but still far from the standard to which I was accustomed a year ago. I then made ​​some capture at lower focal on prominences and main formations and then decided to capture the evolution of the one that seems most interesting, a beautiful tree shape quiescent prominence, it was persistent for several hours, but get involved by a magnetic twister born from the next active region. D
    5 points
  5. Morning all Well I've finally done it...all being well on Thursday I should be the proud owner of a Skywatcher Explorer 200p on a EQ5 mount, granted it is only second hand but condition is as new, I think I done ok for a first scope and price was not bad either £320. Can not wait really excited even booked a couple of days off work so I can have a good play around with it get to know what does what? I think the tricky part is going to be telling the wife will let you know how I get on...oh and there could be lots of questions on the way Regards JemC
    5 points
  6. could of used a smaller box though
    5 points
  7. Another picture of Jupiter at the end of the season.
    4 points
  8. I just love reading the posts from folk who are getting their first 'scope. I remember the feeling, except when I was 10 mine was a 1'' refractor..then at 13 a 2.5'' refractor. I joined Norwich Astronomical Club (as it was then) and they had a 10'' reflector which then was BIG! Patrick Moore advised a 4'' refractor or a 6'' reflector was a good starter..I looked on hungrily. Today things seem more accesible and 'scopes seem much more accesible and affordable. For that I am happy and I too can now afford a bit of apeture. I have been a member of SGL for a year now and just love the site, the in
    4 points
  9. I have 2. They are joined in the middle and are 10 x 50 binoculars.
    4 points
  10. Orion Nebula (Messier 42) from a few nights ago. ~8 hours of data on my Nikon D7000. Best night I have seen here in my little spot of England for the past 3 years. It was absolutely perfect out! I had been wanting to image this again for years as I hadn't since I first started astrophotography and was mightily pleased that I finally got around to it. I have a little bit of coma in the image still just as I forgot to use my field flattener. I processed some of it out, but didn't want to crop too much or lose too much around the edges by using lens correction too much. Aside from that, I was qui
    3 points
  11. More good seeing early evening. that 3 out of the last 4 nights. Pity it didn't happen when Jup was at its best. Was surprised how dark Ganymede appears, it looks like a Callisto transit? Martin
    3 points
  12. My grab and go set up is the APM TMB 105 f/6.2 triplet Apo, mounted on a Tele Optic Ercole Alt Az mount and a carbon fibre Gitzo GT5532 6X Series 5 tripod (trying say that lot 3 times real fast!). Also my airline portable set up. Total weight of that lot is around 11kg, but the mount can take an OTA of up to 8kg (OTA actually 6kg including rings) without a counterweight (18kg with).
    3 points
  13. Here's a shot of the new mount temporarily set up to check things (I need to get the positioning right for the adaptations I need to make to the pier). I holds the Skymax 180 alongside the 123 Refractor and piggy-backed Borg easily Helen
    3 points
  14. I'm always getting my mucking words fuddled up as well, Rowan But, then, we should never let schooling mess up our education...and I'm not in jest
    3 points
  15. It's an interesting paradox, isn't it? As scopes get cheaper wrt income, and there's more than ever interest, our skies get less and less accessible due to increasing light pollution even in places where you think the sky should be reasonably dark! Chris
    3 points
  16. yes indeed, we've got a little place in rural southern Spain, dark sky apart from a low red glow from Malaga in the south (Sagittarius and Scorpio), where I do all my imaging. Don't get out there nearly as much as I'd like. It's how I got into the hobby in the first place to be honest, amazed at how clear those skies are and thought I should maybe get a telescope...
    3 points
  17. I also did a few of the moon a few nights ago. Here's one I prepared earlier. Done using the Canon in planetary mode as with Jupiter. Peter
    3 points
  18. Could have sworn I posted this earlier, but I can find no trace of it now... Anyhow, I've loaded a pile of data back onto my laptop from last week for processing. Here are a couple of Jupiter images and they're real rarities at the moment. There's not a transit in sight! I think the first is a little noisy and I wonder if the imaging run was cut short for some reason (I'm sure it was part of an autorun in FireCapture). The second is 150 seconds at 30fps. Both using an ASI120MC, C9.25, Revelation 2.5x barlow. Preprocessed with PIPP, 40% stacked using AS!2 and Registax for wavelets. I was
    2 points
  19. Here's a picture of my little GSO 6" F4 Newtonian at work imaging the Rosette Nebula. The inset is what the scope took at the time. Anyone else got similar pics?
    2 points
  20. Unfortunately most of the clear skies over the last week seems to have missed me at my location but I did get out imaging last Monday and observing on Tuesday so it could be worse!! I've finally had a chance to process the data from last week and although the seeing was variable, I did manage to at least get a couple of images worth posting. I've also included a GIF which is a first for me using 'PhotoScape' (thanks for the info on that Stuart) which was easy to use so I'd recommend it if you are thinking about giving animations a go. The animation consists of 22 10000 frame AVI's taken over
    2 points
  21. Hi everyone, Just posting another Jupiter image from 11.03 my last session to date with the new filter and camera combination. This was taken earlier in the evening before Callisto`s shadow made an appearance but with the GRS more centre stage as it were. Seeing, as I have said before, wasn`t great which always seems to be the case when the red spot is on view and I try to image it! Am fairly happy with this. Anyway thanks for looking and clear skies....ever hopeful...!! Best regards, Ralph
    2 points
  22. This is only my second time using the DMK 41 on Jupiter and it's by far my best effort yet, I'm really pleased with it. I started off using no barlow and caught the tail end of a shadow transit although I don't think that's as clear a image, I was wondering if the SW x2 may not be the best after last night but tonight the x2 worked a treat. These were stacked in AS!2 and wavelets applied in Regi6 with some minor tweaks in PS but not much to be honest. I have no idea if I can get any more out of the processing. I have included the first images tif as well if anyone wants to have a play, I'd lov
    2 points
  23. I posted an LRGB version of M106 up earlier this month which I had managed to accumulate over 17 hours of data on during the great spell of weather we were treated to at the start of March. It was OK, but I wasn't happy, 17 hours worth of imaging time + whatever I spent processing should have given me more back. I was also annoyed that I found a set of data from 2012 (lum only) which was half the exposure time (5 min subs v's 10 min this year) and showed much more of the spiral arms than I had managed. So, I've had the data open and re-processed about 5/6 times and every single time ended up g
    2 points
  24. George, is it not you that has introduced the word ‘cause’? Is it not you that has then taken that word and extended it to produce an accusation that members here are discussing ‘first cause’? Are you saying then, that we can discuss: * The way that these (theoretical) gravity waves are detected at the South Pole. and before that... * How they travelled across the universe and how the information they may contain is likely to have been changed or corrupted en route. and before that... * The moment and circumstances in which they were generated. ... and then we must stop? Anything before
    2 points
  25. Hi Matt, I bought a Lunt 60 pressure tuner about 18 months ago and asked a very similar question. The answer was not much difference, but the PTs give a finer control over the tuning so went for one based on using it for imaging. I am glad I did as I double stacked it about a year ago with a front mounted tilt Etalon and the tuning is much finer on the PT than it is on the tilt. Instinctively the PT should produce a more even image as the plates of the Etalon don't tilt, it is the air pressure in the chamber that changes to tune the Etalon so it should give a more even image over a wider fie
    2 points
  26. Can't beat the bins, I don't have one, or a pair I should say. The only thing that is the best grab and go of all is my eyes, no cool down, no strain, no wobbles, no focusing required, always ready, well, at least when I have my specs on anyway I tend to do the odd bit of gazing in the garden some nights just sitting down looking up, no scope, just me, that's it, can be fun too
    2 points
  27. Another vote for a dob as a grab n go, it doesnt have to be a little scope to be able to set up and observe quickly.
    2 points
  28. Fingers crossed. FLO really are great guys, you cannot fault their customer service.
    2 points
  29. I have just received the review scope again, (it's been visiting Astrofest and other photography shows) complete with rings, so will recommence testing and reviewing very soon The weather was appalling when I last tried the scope, in the middle of the floods, so let's hope for a better result this time round! Also, The scope will be with me at SGL9, and hopefully in use, weather permitting. I may not be able to stay past the Friday though, so if you wish to see the scope in action please allow for that.
    2 points
  30. My 10" Dob is also a very quick set up, but I don't see that it fulfills the 'Go' part of Grab and Go. It fits in the car okay but I couldn't take it on holiday or even a walk down to the park away from local streetlights. Grab and stay put, yes my Dob but grab and go is the little refractor. A suitcase or lightweight truss Dob would be different though
    2 points
  31. Truthfully I echo the original posters' words it has been a delight to talk to so many educated people and to meet so many people I would never get to meet and talk to in real life.
    2 points
  32. I’ve been enviously watching the detailed Mars images appear here on SGL from the 8+ inch scopes, when my previous efforts over the last couple of weeks have been absolutely awful. You wouldn’t have known it was a planet, it just looked like a small fuzzy splodge, through the SPC900 or the DMK21! I’d been starting to wonder whether that was all I would be able to get on Mars, and I’ve been struggling to reconcile that with the view I had of Mars a couple of years back through the little Mak, where I could see bags of detail (by Mars standards anyway! ). Anyway, just after midnight I set the c
    2 points
  33. Yesterday afternoon reading the thread 'To get better views of Mars with a 250px.. New Barlow or Eyepiece?' highlighted the need to concentrate an observation session on one object in order to really see those moments of exceptional seeing. I took advantage of an unexpected clear sky last night where transparency seemed very good for the city. So with NO sky surfing on the agenda I set up and got comfortable for a few hours. The seeing varied in extremes, sometimes swinging suddenly back and forth in brief time frames, this was managed by juggling between eyepieces as conditions changed. Cu
    2 points
  34. I have to agree with Mike. It is a really good barlow, so don't let a little extra mag put you off. I am very happy with my Orion shorty plus, the exact same optics in a different coat. Fully agree with above. Eyepiece designs all vary a bit, so a constant 2x with every ep you own is unlikely unless you use a single parfocal range. Even then it depends on the above. I would not sweat over it, just enjoy it knowing it is a quality bit of kit.
    2 points
  35. I think so ! I have taken a bit of a liberty with your pic but the areas of more and less suspected gas certainly match up with those in Daniels pic suggesting that they are not artefacts, so yes go shoot down that moon and get stacking
    2 points
  36. I just noticed this thread (sorry, a bit late to board the boat) but as I was mentioned a couple times in the thread I thought I should weigh in. Yes, a fork mount on a wedge is do-able. No, it as not as common or as easy (from what I hear) to go this route. I started with a CPC800 just on its normal Alt-Az mounting. I didn't want to spend a fortune as I was just learning the hobby so started that way constantly being told I couldn't do things with such a setup and set to prove them wrong. This soon became a trend. I eventually got a Milburn wedge (no, it was not cheap but I got it used so w
    2 points
  37. Canned air is one of the shortest routes to needing to dismantle the OTA for cleaning, Best avoided.
    2 points
  38. Thanks all I've been looking at an eq mount on the celestron website a computerised G5 mount and tripod and the faqs on their website says the dovetail joint on my scope will fit it, so looks like that might be the one. I have one book so far long exposure astrophotography, and I will be getting more once I've moved. I've got some good shots of the moon and The Orion Nebula but nothing fancy, I've managed to get a small but reasonable shot of Jupiter with my DSLR, and soon I should be getting some better shots and something to be proud of..... again thanks everyone for your help it is very m
    2 points
  39. Managed to get some video done on the 16th before the clouds arrived. Jupiter was showing the GRS and I had Ganymede in transit. Took this using the Canon in planetary mode with a 2XBarlow on the CPC. Exposures were at 1/15sec ISO400 and 3000 frames processed in PIPP and Registax. This is about the best I can do with my equipment I think. If any one has a similar set up and gets better results please let me know how you do it. Peter
    2 points
  40. The original COSMOS was a ground-breaking series. It still stands as one of the most watched programs ever seen on TV. Fantastic (for the time) effects, music by Vangelis and hosted by Carl Sagan, surely one of the most justifiably famous popularisers of science ever. For many, me included, COSMOS kicked of a life-long fascination with science and the wonders of the natural Universe. For Neil deGrasse Tyson, meeting Carl Sagan set him on his path to being a scientist. I remember watching the original series as a kid growing up in rural Ireland, a country, at the time, cloaked in a deep recessi
    2 points
  41. There is no requirement for the OTA to be pointing North or level on an alt-az mount. All you need is the mount to be level. There is no such thing as a 'home' position. The SLT will track and point no matter where you start it from, providing you follow one of the star-align routines. NigelM
    2 points
  42. I have to disagree with this. My first 'scope was a GOTO one and without the extra assistance it gave me in finding my way around I'd never have got further than looking at the Moon.While there are certainly a few issues with learning and setting up a GOTO telescope for the first time, most people do those (like discovering how to set the location & time) once only - after that they know. Similarly, once you've done your first polar alignment, most people mark where the tripod legs are located on the ground and just put the 'scope back in the same place each time. After that the alignment
    2 points
  43. Being of the 'ginger' clan, I get called much worse daily (by the misses).........
    1 point
  44. Welcome to SGL. Liking the nickname! Best. Mark
    1 point
  45. Hi David and welcome to SGL - Glad that you found us, you've come to the right place for all astro related chat that's for sure ..... and often more besides Look forward to seeing you around
    1 point
  46. While we are talking about gradients, I found this tutorial absolutely brilliant - It removed gradients that DBE wouldn't touch. I've used it a couple of times now - absolutely excellent http://www.corius.net/?page_id=395
    1 point
  47. better looking for a local timber merchants they are often cheaper than B&Q etc and they will cut timber to whatever size you need as for preservatives you can buy impregnated wood pre treated and very good at what it does, if you do it yourself Cuprinol is a good brand thats easy to use and apply, but overall's and good heavy duty rubber gloves will be required
    1 point
  48. Another useful tip, use very small delicate turns at a time on each. When I did the first time on my smaller Dob I turned the screws too much, before you know it is like having to start afresh and the secondary is all over the place. That is not a bad way if you want to learn staring from scratch, but usually the factory secondary setting should be fairly close and only tweaking is needed. A small tilt adjustment can be achieved with say 1/4 turn on two of the outer screws and the other way round for the third, or vice versa so the whole thing does not get very loose in the process. Have fu
    1 point
  49. I am locking this thread as it is becoming increasingly hard to take it seriously. Any new thread on this topic needs to contain precise observations, including position of the objects observed, date and time, equipment used, etc. Sketches would be helpful. Only then can we have a meaningful discussion without people thinking their legs are being pulled
    1 point
  50. An interesting quandry and one that cannot be taken lightly. My first point is that if you are starting from the beginning and have nothing but the book Making Every Photon Count then have you already decided on a mount? I ask as this is THE single most important factor in DSO imaging, not the camera as would appear logical, afterall it is astrophotograpghy right? Mount first ............. Did I say mount first?!!! If you are then thinking about a DSLR or a CCD then I assume that you are prepared to throw the budget at the hobby that is required? Personally speaking there seems to be a thought
    1 point
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