Jump to content

sgl_imaging_challenge_2021_2.thumb.jpg.72789c04780d7659f5b63ea05534a956.jpg

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 15/03/14 in all areas

  1. C14, 2x Meade TeleXtender, atmospheric dispersion corrector and ASI120MM. The seeing was quite good. RGB, LRGB, YRGB, RedLumRGB; 23:13+ UT: 3x drizzle: RGB, Yellow channel, RedLumRGB; 00:25 UT+; altitude ~16 deg:
    9 points
  2. I’ve been enviously watching the detailed Mars images appear here on SGL from the 8+ inch scopes, when my previous efforts over the last couple of weeks have been absolutely awful. You wouldn’t have known it was a planet, it just looked like a small fuzzy splodge, through the SPC900 or the DMK21! I’d been starting to wonder whether that was all I would be able to get on Mars, and I’ve been struggling to reconcile that with the view I had of Mars a couple of years back through the little Mak, where I could see bags of detail (by Mars standards anyway! ). Anyway, just after midnight I set the c
    6 points
  3. Tonight with the grand kids nicely playing inside I set the VX10 out to cool.The forecast is for a dead clear,moonlit evening.Early on the clouds rolled in and out,but this did not hamper the 6mmDelos @ 200x,many familiar sights seen.The Fuji orthos gave a greater showing at this point as well, but...in a hour or so the 5mmFuji @ 240x really came into its own.Unreal detail,clarity-this the first time I saw a couple of round white spots next to the GRS,not the white oval on the other side of it(seen too),great detail within the bands and watched the transit for awhile.I am still amazed at how m
    5 points
  4. Psst! Don't worry I'll whisper this quietly so no one else can hear.Your an "Astronomy lecturer" you must have heard of Dawes limit? Check out pluto's disc size. Then, have a look for the Dawes limit for a 19.5" scope. Then rewrite your post huh Pluto's disc indeed..........chinny reckon mate I did laugh though, funny thread.
    5 points
  5. Could have sworn I posted this earlier, but I can find no trace of it now... Anyhow, I've loaded a pile of data back onto my laptop from last week for processing. Here are a couple of Jupiter images and they're real rarities at the moment. There's not a transit in sight! I think the first is a little noisy and I wonder if the imaging run was cut short for some reason (I'm sure it was part of an autorun in FireCapture). The second is 150 seconds at 30fps. Both using an ASI120MC, C9.25, Revelation 2.5x barlow. Preprocessed with PIPP, 40% stacked using AS!2 and Registax for wavelets. I was
    3 points
  6. Finally done the animation from this night of good seeing (probably my best ever Jupiter session). The seeing was not great at the start and tailed off at the end but the middle section was pretty hot despite thin cloud. 15 images covering just under one hour between 19.03 & 20.01 UT. I've left the field rotation in as I can never get a 100% smooth orientation when trying to correct it (always a slight wobble). QHY5L-II colour cam & Auto Dob 250 @f18 Here is an animated GIF and also attached a zip file with better quality file for media player. Moons are Io & Ganymede (with its tra
    3 points
  7. It was my birthday yesterday (one of those worrying ones with a 0 on the end!) and my best friend did this for me Helen
    3 points
  8. SPX350 F39.1, PGRFlea3, Baader rgb, 742nm filters. Break in clouds gave a 15min gap in which a light mist settled over Mars dimming it slightly but steadying the seeing. Image shows Olympus Mons centre bright cloud with cloud over Tharsis and Chryse. on the right side. This is my best image so far. I had a quick go of saturn in fair seeing later on. Mars RGB-1356hrs UT Mars red Saturn R RGB-1642hrs UT Saturn IR-1652hrs UT. Thanks, John.
    3 points
  9. Just setup and cooling down for tonight in my back garden.
    3 points
  10. Luke, In the week I have owned mine my time at some form of scope has doubled, I think a solar scope is a must in the UK to keep away the frustrations I bet most people spend more on coffee and booze over a 12 month period than the cost of a Solar scope
    3 points
  11. Sort of, 14BY is the distance to the opaque wall of radiation left by the Big Bang, when corrected for the expansion of the universe. There's a chance that the universe could have been around longer, but the conditions which make for an omnipresent field of energy wouldn't last long. The Cosmic Microwave Background is all around us and can't be blocked in all directions by the intervening matter. This was something which took me a long time to wrap my head around The standard 'the universe is a balloon' model didn't do anything for me. The 'simplest' way to describe it is to imagine the univ
    3 points
  12. Finally I am getting better results. Avi´s stacked in AS!2 then processed in Astra Image. About 500 best of 1300 @ 14 fps with 1280x960. Out of curiosity; How many frames do you other capture during an avi session?, and how many frames do you usually stack for closeups? /Erik
    2 points
  13. I was lucky enough to pick up a used NEQ6 at a very reasonable price, and before I move on my old mount to cover the cost I thought I'd sit them side by side to show the difference between the mounts. I was shocked not at how much bigger but how much chunkier and heavier the NEQ6 is over the HEQ5. The NEQ6 polar scope cap got lost in transit, so if anyone knows where I can get a replacement I'd be very grateful!
    2 points
  14. Seeing was very stable last night though fog started to descend as I turned to the moon. Decided to try the 5x powermate with my mono QHY5L-II cam which would normally be OTT but I felt this was the time to give it a go. Quick process 1000 frames @f22. Only 6 alignment points used as this was done on my slow netbook. Click image for full scale:
    2 points
  15. Lousy seeing again last night, this shot was taken through very thin cloud & as consequence come out a bit soft! Thanks for looking!
    2 points
  16. Hi, wanted to share the last image, it's rarely imaged though it's worth doing so if only for its vegetable name;) http://www.astrobin.com/83976/ Thanks for looking! Mark
    2 points
  17. Dear all, This is the result of my first night out with the DFK 618 colour camera. I came across a number of problems and I'm asking for some help from those of you who know how to use this camera, please. First of all, the image is a stack of only 10 seconds 30fps and Powermate 5X in SW200P. I thought I was recording a minute but for some reason, most of the videos had a length of 6 and 10 seconds. I have no idea why that happened. Then, I wanted to use the 60 fps Y800 option but I have no idea about processing that in registax. Can someone kindly indicate what I need to do? Thank you. I expe
    2 points
  18. I've not posted this for a few days as I've not been happy with it. I've taken on board some comments from others and have made a few changes in the last couple of days. It's still not as I would like, but I do know that the collimation is out and I need to sort this on my next clear night. All comments good, bad and indifferent are welcomed and I even take notice of them!! Sorry about the gradients showing in the image here, but they are not in the original. Details: Avalon Linear Fast Reverse Celestron C9.25 0.63x Atik 460EXM with Baader RGB and Hutech P2 for luminance 50x600s L 50x180s each
    2 points
  19. Just like night time photography the processing is a fine art (which I need some practice with) but I'm quite please with my first go: Very grateful for any pointers!!! QHY5L-II two runs of 1000 frames one exposed for proms, one for surface, stacked in registax 6 and processed in photoshop
    2 points
  20. Takahashi 25mm is good option.
    2 points
  21. Often when I talk to people about astronomy, observing and imaging, they ask if you can see the Apollo craft on the Moon. Even with my best resolution pictures taken for my big mosaic, the best resolution I can make out is 2000 feet across. This doesn't mean much to the average person when looking at the Moon, so I've made this picture, picking out a crater on the Moon, showing a larger version with the cropped area marked out, and finally, the close up. On top of this I've added a crop of the area of land around the M25 motorway ( Motorway marked in yellow ). Most people can picture the M25 e
    2 points
  22. Hi Louise, This the is processed data of the Leo Triplet. Dealing with the gradients caused by the Moon and the LP was a nightmare but here it is anyway, I have not had a great dealsuccess with teh IC405 yet but all is not lost yet despite the severe LP levels. Regards, A.G
    2 points
  23. Just finished stacking this image from the 3rd I think, the seeing has been amazing this time around, just with very basic equipment - an old Philips Toucam web cam a x2 barlow (the shorty from Meade) and the CPC 1100, the file was around 5 minutes long and about 350Mb, stacked using registax 6 with very little processing, just goes to show that the height of Jupiter and the really steady seeing - you wouldn't think it though - the raw image was very soft and blurred. I dare not post it in the imaging section -the detail "pulled" out of the stacked image makes for a very nice view, but, visu
    2 points
  24. Lovely report, Gerry and it must have been a night of great seeing. It's also nice to hear the orthos living up to a great reputation and putting on a brave fight, especially in light of some of those more exoctic and tasty EPs in your collection I agree that it'll be really handy to have a fan, Alex. In principle it should increase the rate of heat loss from the primary mirror, scramble the boundary layer and help prevent dew forming on the primary. It's interesting to note that both of you (Gerry & Alex) have mentioned warmer tones on certain eyepieces. I've found the same thing with
    2 points
  25. just my back garden is the only place I observe. Sent from my GT-I9300 using Tapatalk
    2 points
  26. No, different scope with different chair. This is our other Mak, same tripod, same location; drummers stool in the car if needed.
    2 points
  27. mmm im going to hobby craft tomorrow i may pick up some stuff and give it ago
    2 points
  28. Went out early to avoid rapidly forming fog. Seeing was quite stable but had to image at f20 to keep the gain at a reasonable level. Quite pleased with the result and the first time I had seen the small red spot in the northern hemisphere.. Thanks for looking Martin
    2 points
  29. I also observed Jupiter on Thursday night in very still and misty conditions. It was one of the best views of the planet I've ever seen. At 225x with my 12mm Radian it looked like a photo stuck on the end of the telescope! GRS and Io in transit were very clear. After a winter of mainly terrible seeing conditions, I was starting to wonder if there was something wrong with my scope. After that short session I'm happy it's okay. Chris.
    2 points
  30. First course of action, make a cover for the bottom of the telescope. That stops any ambient light from leaking in around the primary. Secondly, make sure the light source you are using for your flats is sufficiently diffuse. The problem might be in the flats, try flattening the background using software rather than a flat and you will find the rings are not there (i've had the same issue, it only appears after applying flats). A common thread is that it seems to be when the conditions are very poor, the field of illumination is more difficult to correct. Ive also wondered if there is anything
    2 points
  31. LoL They truly are fantastic and worth every penny, I only have 3 concerns:- SunstrokeDehydrationAperture fever The wife ( I know that makes 4 )
    2 points
  32. juat found this and is not bad for a 2min read enjoy http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2014/03/140313-noctilucent-clouds-pictures-cosmos-science/
    2 points
  33. Looks like a good place, suppose Observatory Dive is a bit of a clue. Is Observatory Drive Scenic Overlook scenic? Just reading that close by is the parking lot for Badger Football. Is "Badger Football" not considered a cruel sport? How do you roll them into a ball and stop them unrolling and running away? OK, time to stop winding up our US friends. :grin: Enjoy the evening. Ooh, that was post 3900. In 100 I metamorphosize I think into something else.
    2 points
  34. Several attempts have been made at presenting the sound that stars etc make, and I guess if someone dug them all out every one would have a different sound for the same object. It is a bit like the multitude of AP images we see - someone makes up their interpretation. Many here must have looked at images of M42 in bright reds and purples. So why is the only visual descriptions of M42 is grey and a possible vague hint of green? The sound the sun makes: Well it is a large thermonuclear fusion bomb, so I guess Handels water music is a low probability. Something makes me suspect a very loud and v
    2 points
  35. Quite a few astronomy books on sale at The Works, including the "Philip's" guides to observing with a telescope and observing with binoculars at £1.99. Also the Patrick Moore 2014 Year book of Astronomy for £8.99, hurrah ! Nick.
    2 points
  36. The frustrations are still there Shaun. I work a split shift and am home between 11am and 3pm every day. I've lost count of the days when it has started sunny and been cloudy by lunchtime. Of course, as summer approaches and the sun sets later, the viewing window is extended and the chance of using the scope increase dramatically. Solar scopes are very quick to set up and it only needs 5mins of clear sky to get a fix. Wouldn't ever be without my solarscopes now.
    2 points
  37. Hi steve from a fellow newbie lol one thing I would say when you get your scope is set it up in daylight. Focus the biggest eyepiece you get with the scope then align the finder scope or red dot finder with a tv aerial or street light as far away as possible ( at least 500 yards ) you can do this by using the biggest eyepiece you have got position the scope so the image is in the center of the eyepiece then adjust the finder so the image is in the center of both the finder and the scope . This is a lot easier to do in daylight than in the dark
    2 points
  38. Hi Gerry, I had a similar experience two nights back, with my 200p on 250x, and it was the first time I have been able to see such detail in the 12 months that I have owned this scope. The GRS was clearly visible, and just for good measure, the tiny white disc of Europa appeared on the limb. What a wow moment when everything comes together. Last night was cloudy, and having enjoyed a lot of Jupiter time in the last two weeks, I stayed in. The Lacerta micro- focusser that I have just ordered as a much needed upgrade, should arrive today and will be ready for tonight if the sky clears. Clear ski
    2 points
  39. We're hoping to do a side by side comparison at SGL 9. Having used a variety of scopes, I'd say the best view I've had is with a 12" f5.3 00. What is amazing is the difference that eyepieces make, even under different seeing. It really is a juggling act with Barlows and eps even before reaching for a filter or two. Last time out I found that even a black card placed 50% over the end of the Newt ota sharpened the view. Some times a thin layer of cloud can do the same thing. Hopefully at SGL with so many scopes, we might find a good combination, although there's so many folk to talk to ! Nick.
    2 points
  40. Thats wonderful, I went out last night with my new 150p, first time for mr ever and I saw jupiter at 11 30 could just make out the bands (just learning) but I was thrilled with my view, went back out at 4 30 and could see saturn, wow that was even better, managed 2 badly taken mobile pictures just to prove it to my husband when he wakes up
    2 points
  41. Ay, it would be an interesting experiment to see the kind of adverse affects these things have on a telescope. In terms of thermal play, it would be interesting to see how, for example, a mounted 8" Mak or SGT or Newt performed in comparison to an 8" dob, for in principle, they'd all be cutting through a similar wedge of sky. Or again, how a 4" frac compared with something like a table top Heritage. I guess there are just way too many variables to give any kind of concrete and solid answer, but I wonder whether similar aperture scopes mounted in different manners would perform differently in '
    2 points
  42. There is a lot of evidence to suggest that what we are being told is correct. The observations made are generally repeatable and in some cases even debunked by the same people that suggested them. Science doesn't have "The answer" but given the collective intelligence that agrees with the findings I am not one to declare "Shenanigans!" However, I still think if you have the mind set to challenge opinion and observation then do so. I believe that science encourages this, although, scientists will sometimes scoff and laugh until proven beyond doubt, challenges to popular scientific thinking.
    2 points
  43. Hmmmmmm . . . . forum backpedalling . . . In the words of George Best "I spent a lot of money on birds, booze and fast cars. The rest I just squandered."
    2 points
  44. Wow!! Dad has just surprised me with a top for the pier!! Absolute surprise! Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    2 points
  45. Mars can be very frustrating but when everything is right then its extremely rewarding. Tips are really the same as for any planetary Good steady seeing Acclimated scope If you have a newt or sct make sure its collimated Your comfort, use an observing chair Take your time and look, dont just snatch a view, you need to work at the low contrast detail If you have planetary filters try them, its amazing what details different colours show
    2 points
  46. A few from past star parties with a group of stargazing friends.
    2 points
  47. Oh and just for fun, here's an animation of the few frames I captured that night... James
    2 points
  48. Give your primary collimation knobs 3 full turns anticlockwise so the mirror sits further back in the OTA Mike. When you collimate your scope each time if you turn them clockwise all the time it shortens the focal length only by a few mm but it can be enough that some EP's won't come to focus, the same happens with my 28mm ES.
    2 points
  49. Hi, Stevie, and a warm welcome to SGL! I don't know if you have it already, but if not I can highly recommend you downloading the free planetarium software 'Stellarium' which many on here use to both find objects in the night sky and plan a viewing session. It will complement your planisphere and 'Turn Left...' well, and is also customisable for local conditions (locality, light pollution etc). It can also be customised to your own scope - giving you an idea of what you should be able to see through the eyepiece. Downloadable here: http://stellarium.org/ Hope that helps, and good luck with you
    1 point
  50. My little icon is of me with the 'scope in the park observing Venus. As you can see from the mist, not ideal observing position, but we did see it's little crescent. The full image is below: Note also my awesome puffin hat... DD
    1 point
  • Newsletter

    Want to keep up to date with all our latest news and information?
    Sign Up
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.