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Showing content with the highest reputation on 11/12/13 in all areas

  1. my little girls school is doing 'Space' as its winter project for Year 2 and the teacher found out i was in an Astro club and had a scope etc - so I ended up getting pursuaded to come in today with my clobber and do a little show and tell and talk to 40 kids (6 and 7 year olds). Damn pretty young female teachers and their pursuasive ways!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! so anyway, just thought I;d drop a note in here to say if you are ever asked by a junior or infants school to go and talk to them about astronomy - DO IT. It was brilliant fun and the kids loved it! Started off with a quick chat about what tele
    15 points
  2. Seeing was a little better than of late. Got 3 or 4 to process. Heres the first capture I took. 5X powermate RGB 12" SW Newt
    7 points
  3. and the video of the ISS transit the single image comes from
    7 points
  4. My first real attempt of Horsehead nebula. Keep in mind, I'm using an unmoded cam, so the "reds" are kinda pushed to the edge in photoshop. Also I forgot to take darks in the second set of lights, so there is some noise that I am not pleased with. Image was cropped a bit, and downsized. INFO: 1st set: ISO 1600, 18x6min light 2nd set: ISO 800, 23x6min light 7 darks 12 flats 41 offsets Camera: EOS 1000D - unmod. Scope: QUATTRO 10" CF f/4 mounted on NEQ6 SS Pro Thank you for looking.
    5 points
  5. I joined this forum in January. I had decided to buy a Celestron 9.25 SCT and had shopped around and found FLO. They were extremely helpful ( I now know this is the norm) and I was pointed towards SGL. I retired (well almost) at the end of last year and I had decided to buy myself a bigger scope and take advantage of the time that I could now spend on the hobby. Previously I had spent what time I could but I felt very much on my own and feeling my way in the dark (!). But this fantastic forum has changed everything. I've started a few topics on observing issues that I had always wondered abo
    5 points
  6. Morning all, Despite the threat of fog last night it held off long enough for me to capture 4 hours of OIII to complete a colour version of a close-up view in the rosette nebula I have been working on. The subs were all shot at 15 minutes using the ever superb Astrodon filters and then applied in a traditional Ha:OIII:OIII method. I wanted to keep the look of a traditional RGB natural colour scheme, but without loosing the benefits that using narrowband filters bring. A point of interest in the processing of this image is there is *no noise reduction* applied whatsoever!!!! I am going to savou
    4 points
  7. You'll have to take my word for it, but that is Mars. Seeing had been pretty good but this turned out a bit of a mess. Knew I should have gone to bed!!!! Earlier in the night I got this (just a stack in AS!2 and wavelets in R6 so far) so things went down hill a bit as the night went on. Lots of file processing to do before I get a final image but it's not bad so far for a blue.
    4 points
  8. I got the Skyris on the little 125ETX Mak tonight and grabbed some moon between clouds. I've only had chance to process one so far but thought I should post today in honour of SPM. So here is Mare Serentatis. (I'm chuffed to get some lunar mountain shadows for the first time) Helen
    4 points
  9. Wow! I have just spent some time looking at Jupiter and then the moon. Seeing the 4 moons all lined up on the one side of Jupiter was a nice quirk tonight. I then turned to the moon and I know I don't have the best scope in the world, but was totally blown away by the views of the moon this evening. With the 15mm BST and 2x Barlow, the moon just amazed me. My neighbour popped over and was completely impressed too. I then gave him a quick tour of the Pleiades and Orions Nebula, he wandered off muttering something about getting himself one! Its always nice when you can impress someone like that.
    4 points
  10. Here's mine from 19th Feb 2013 as an animated GIF
    4 points
  11. Managed to get more subs last night giving a total (so far) of 4 hours 10 mins of data. Baader 7nm Ha filter. Altair Astro 115 EDT-APO, Atik 383L+ mono. Processed in PI and PS. Inset - the tadpoles
    3 points
  12. Hi This subject is very rarely imaged in the full narrow band palette as there is virtually no OIII and little SII compared to the Ha. It is more common to image it in LRGB or HaLRGB combined. I have done the latter but I wanted to see if there was anything that could be done with just the traditional narrow band filters. The OIII signal is so weak that it has to be stretched just to be able to see it. But, it is there, it just requires enough data and time and patience to tease it out. This is a total of almost 15 hours exposure time with 4.5 hours Ha and 5 hours each of OIII and SII and it h
    3 points
  13. So much mist and cloud about its very hard to get a decent night lately so managed to grab 20 subs of the horsey last night trying out my framing of this wonderful night sky object. Going to go back to it again soon as I can to get more data but just wanted to practise framing it up for later on. This was only 20 subs 80sec long ISO800 on a misty moon lit night so once conditions improve hoping to get more data for a better image but its fun to keep practising. Any one else out there hate guiding as much as I do rather get taking some short subs then keep messing around with phd and my webcam
    3 points
  14. Hi. I am the dev of Night Sky Tools. Glad you guys like the app. I am always open to suggestions and feedback for the app.
    3 points
  15. I once got an HEQ5 Sysncan Pro and a SW 200P dob - both in mint condition under a year old. The guy had tried but couldn't get on with the sky and decided to ditch the hobby and priced them competitively to clear quick - Cost me 500 notes total
    3 points
  16. Sure. The primary reason is that they are more engaging than standard Plossls because their AFOV is slightly widened to an advertised 55 degrees (although my measures say 57 degrees). This small increase is significant perceptually compared to a standard 50 degree AFOV Plossl. Next reason was performance. When I stacked them up against my TV Plossls I noted that their transmission is as good or better as the TVs, which is supelative. Looking at the off-axis, I noted that both the TV ans Sterlings use the modified Plossl design where the external facing surfaces are concave instead of flat
    3 points
  17. Alex, I can get a picture almost like that if I defocus the camera a bit and aim it at an Isle of Man flag. Do we have any Manxmen on SGL ?
    3 points
  18. To me its always a balance of cost and performance. Ultimately if the plossl's work and produce what you want why buy an eyepiece at 5x or 10x the cost. I have read people here seling their ES82's with which they were immensly happy for ES100's, and the only apparent reason being a new option was now available. Concidering I have yet to read how great ES100's are but have read many times how great ES82's are I have to wonder if the change was to any advantage. One slightly odd aspect is that there seems more high end eyepieces for sale then there is for BST's, X-Cels and TV plossl's. Also the
    3 points
  19. The reason the star has such wildly different magnitudes in the various bands is due to dust. Dust preferentially scatters blue light more than red. So blue light is scattered away from the line of sight meaning little makes its way to your camera, whereas red and the NIR are less affected and will appear relatively brighter. This is called interstellar reddening. It's the reason why we have IR observatories-to look through the obscuring dust. The same affect makes the sky blue. There are many wavelength dependent phenomenon at play though- 1. Star brightness varies with wavelength, scattering
    3 points
  20. This probably qualifies as a transit too.
    3 points
  21. If that is your first attempt I am giving up and starting knitting
    3 points
  22. The Orion Nebula also last night, think I'm gonna enjoy this imaging malarky.
    3 points
  23. This is exactly how I started , brought my better half a scope for Christmas 2 years ago now this is what my spare room looks like
    3 points
  24. This has been a long time in the making - but I have finally started digging the ground for my observatory. I have had a lot of things to do before I could start (as you will see) and have had plenty of time to umm and ahh about what to biuild, but following on from steve1962's success in automating his Pulsar Dome, I've decided to do the same. Unfortunately I had a number of tasks to complete before the Obsy could go up: 1) Cut tress 2) Move shed #1 200 feet to other end of garden 3) Convert shed #1 to Rabbit Towers Mansion for daughter 4) Remove 80 foot x 4 foot concrete path (and fill with
    2 points
  25. Orion Nebula (Messier 42) from a few nights ago. ~8 hours of data on my Nikon D7000. Best night I have seen here in my little spot of England for the past 3 years. It was absolutely perfect out! I had been wanting to image this again for years as I hadn't since I first started astrophotography and was mightily pleased that I finally got around to it. I have a little bit of coma in the image still just as I forgot to use my field flattener. I processed some of it out, but didn't want to crop too much or lose too much around the edges by using lens correction too much. Aside from that, I was qui
    2 points
  26. Is M1 an easy target? I guess for me its quite low lurking inthe LP of London. Anyway here is my first attempt at this target. 10*900 Ha, 5*900 OII and 8*900 SII (SII got more data as i left it running while doing somethingh else) Camera Atik 383L cooled to -20 Seeing was quite poor with a heavy dew by morning Enjoy and feel free to be open with your criticism, i am still learning there is much more in PI that i could do im sure.
    2 points
  27. Rather different processing on this one. 1.5 x then downsized
    2 points
  28. Hi, This is also not imaged often, LBN 603 itself it to left/top of the image http://www.astrobin.com/67347/ Thanks for looking! Mark
    2 points
  29. I posted a similar thread in the solar section - I always love to see airplanes transit the moon when I'm imaging. Let's see what you've got! Anything counts that was between your camera and the moon: aircraft, planets, birds, space station, etc. Here is my one and only processed effort so far:
    2 points
  30. What on earth Is happening to weather and short term forecasts in Middle England ? Our prevailing winds are from the west with weather systems coming in regularly. I use the app Scope-nights. I think that a length of sea weed would be of greater use. I cannot recall the number of occasions when a tea break or an eyepiece change had resulted in complete cloud cover. I cannot recall the number the way off forecasts either. I've got into the habit of just setting up the mount and waiting ! What worries me is that these gurus of weather are predicting climate , a bushel of seaweed for each of t
    2 points
  31. Greetings earthlings. I don't claim to be an astrophotographer - yet anyway.... But I have a small issue. I am new to astronomy, only own a Z12 dob right now.... But as a preparation for doing some astrophotography, I went ahead and got me a 2" camera adapter for my Nikon DSLR. Now, to use this in my current dob, I have to use a 2x barlow to be able to focus. Well heck. This gives me a focal length of 3000x! TOO MUCH! I plan to get me a refractor to use my camera with sometime soon, but for now, snapping shots of the moon is going to be my hobby. The below photo of the moon I took last n
    2 points
  32. Well... Following zero response, I took a deep breath and started unscrewing.... I thought I would share my experience, so that if somebody wants to mod their EOS 60D there is a little bit of info for them. I made use of the website mentioned above and, while not exact instructions, the info there is very helpful and the 60D isn't massively different. Tools: small Phillips screwdrivers, small flat head screwdrivers, small torx screwdriver (no.6 I think), toothpick, blutack and a pair of nitrile gloves. I made drawings of each stage, showing the location of each screw / data ribbon removed, ea
    2 points
  33. Pleiades has always been one of my favorite night sky objects. Ever since I was little I could spot it with my naked eye. I always called it the "Tiny Dipper" because to the naked eye it resembled a very tiny version of the other 2 "dippers". I also recently took an interest in the ISS. When I discovered you could see it passing overhead at night, I've been trying to catch it through breaks in the clouds ever since. The skies were clear tonight as the snow storm that pelted us all morning had moved on. I took advantage and set up to catch the ISS as it crossed overhead. I really didn't e
    2 points
  34. Then you have to remember to take it off before moving the scope too far It may be sensible to make up a little lanyard for it so it can't drop on the ground if you do forget. They tend to break rather easily James
    2 points
  35. If all fails, use some scrap wood or roof batten, a hand saw, a bunch of drill-tip-self-tapping screws, felt pads, laminate scraps, pipe end covers, ... or cans! :-) And maybe half an hour of work. (sorry for the bad pictures, this was an early prototype)
    2 points
  36. Just a few hours after the Moon set and before fog quickly rolled in from the south. Madame growled in sleep to ask where I was going. In truth out to loose the counterweight bolt in the grass,bang my head on the shed eaves and spend a long time looking for my glasses with a dull red torch. There was a horrible light glow from the amount of moisture above. I noticed Vindemiatrix rising behind Leo in the east. Promises of the galaxy season ahead. M3 was delightfully tight at x100. Quite easy to find halfway between Arcturs and the lovely double Cor Caroli. Then over to M64 and M51, not great b
    2 points
  37. Thanks mate I only have Photshop Elements. For the price of real PS i can upgrade my mount for motorised tracking so im going to do that first.
    2 points
  38. Stu, I have the Astronomik, to use words from an early post today, it came up first secondhand so that made my mind up. I really do not think that there will be anything between these two fine filters. For that matter I am not sure that you would find a site member that has both but you may find someone that has used both at some point, not having them side by side is going to be a tough call as to which is best though. The Astronomik is very good (with the limited use I have given it) in the 115mm and the 70mm, I believe you read my two reports. I get the impression more people have the Ast
    2 points
  39. I managed a poor Venus transit whilst in Poland 2012. camera phone projection onto my ships cabin bulkhead. Some AMAZING shots on this thread.... wow
    2 points
  40. Hi Anthony It was shot with a DMK41 camera at 15fps so I had about 20 frames with it on, tricking bit was driving 10 miles at 3am on a winters morning to get to a site in the middle of nowhere to catch it. I have shot solar transits with a DSLR in the past which are relatively easy as you know to the exact 100th of a second when it's going to occur so you just start shooting a few seconds earlier. I use the Calsky website to predict the transits which I think is far better than heavensabove. Mel
    2 points
  41. 2 points
  42. With my present status at home of Captain Calamity I would have had the whole lot on the floor.......lucky you there was only minor damage.
    2 points
  43. I maintain a complete set of wide fields, a complete set of high performance planetary eyepieces, and a complete set of Plossls (Sterling Plossls). A number of reasons for me: 1. Plössls can really do it all and are a more hassle-free experience being small and compact, so perfect for quick observing sessions. 2. A quality Plössl, having only 4 air-glass interfaces, can provide a slightly brighter view and sometimes a perceived higher contrast as well, so sometimes gives a better perspective on some target features. 3. Sometimes it is just plain "easier" to view a 50-55 deg AFOV than it is a
    2 points
  44. OK here's mine, another ISS lunar transit. Mel
    2 points
  45. The finest detail I'm managed to detect on the Moon is the rille that runs up the Alpine Valley. This feature is less than 1km across even at it's widest. I have only seen certain sections of this rille where it is more prominent and it needs excellent viewing conditions and high magnifications to detect with my 12" scope. The craterlets in the floor of the large crater Plato are a good challenge as well. They range from 2.6km (the largest) downwards. Under favorable lighting conditions I've seen 6 or 7 of these with my 12" scope. The 4 larger ones are visible at high power with my 4.7" refrac
    2 points
  46. in my experience, one scope = frustrated kids waiting to use it. more scopes = happier kids. there's so little to go on but you could buy three-four great dobs and a few sets of great eyepieces and filters for 10k. you could also buy a couple of psts.
    2 points
  47. Nice one Andy, here's my animated gif of the same event it was a cracking morning Mel
    2 points
  48. Enjoy. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GOAEIMx39-w
    1 point
  49. I love the Ha ones. They're particularly nice Not at all sure about Alexandra's December 23rd one though. I think she might be teasing us a little. I reckon she's photoshopped the Sun in from another day. James
    1 point
  50. I was looking at them a few days ago and two were very close together. It took me a few moments to realise that I didn't actually have some sort of collimation problem James
    1 point
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