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Showing content with the highest reputation on 22/11/12 in Posts

  1. I added another panel on to this last night. 2 panels comprising 10 x 20 mins Ha. ED80/QHY9
    7 points
  2. Hey guys and girls, my name is Brandon! I love astronomy and science - basically love the unknown, haha. I simply love to look at the night sky through binoculars, particularly the moon and Jupiter this time of the year... I am quite the 'noob' when it comes to navigating the sky and finding different points of interest however, but hope to expand my knowledge through the use of the program named 'Stellarium', these forums and the internet haha. Soon, I am hoping to purchase my first telescope. For anyone who is interested in what I have chosen for my first telescope (as I am essentially a be
    3 points
  3. Hey all! I'm Adam, just joined up recently having been lurking for a while trying to read up on a good first 'scope to pick! Had a pretty revolutionary moment a few months ago when my brother introduced me to Carl Sagan's Cosmos, giving me a love of astronomy I never expected! Every clear night I'm able to, I'm out there with my 10x50 binocs, checking out the obvious ones, Jupiter, the Moon, Pleiades, and even managed to catch a few glimpses of M31, although never for long because it's always directly above me and it kills my neck! Eagerly awaiting the arrival of my Skywatcher Explorer 130P,
    3 points
  4. Hi, I'm Aylish and I'm new here! I have a Jessops 800-80 Astronomical Telescope and have no idea how the hell to use that thing! Like seriously, I've taken it out once since last Christmas! I have a wide knowledge of astronomy, as in space, not how to see things. However, I really want to start astrophotography and so, here I am! Any tips/pointers would be much appriciated.
    3 points
  5. 3 points
  6. Hello SL I've just joined SL but been interested in astronomy for 40+ years beginning with the astronomical society at school. The first telescope that I had was from Dixons a 'just over 2 inch' refractor courtesy of winning the golden goal competition at Everton (my dad promised he would buy it me with the winnings - sloppy back pass by Bobby Moore; David Johnson goal). I bought a Skywatcher 200P EQ5 this summer (not the best summer for clear nights!) and have been getting used to setting it up. The few clear nights recently have given me the chance to really try it out and I am most impress
    2 points
  7. Hi, I've been lurking on the forum for a couple of months now and the excellent advice available has helped me select my first scope and bag my first clusters and nebula. I’m now looking forward to many evenings with my Skywatcher 130p, BST Explorer eyepieces and copy of Turn Left at Orion. Wishing you all many evenings of clear skies
    2 points
  8. Hi all, back again after a long time off the forum because of nasties on the puter. All sorted now, The forum has grown some from the last time I was online, and boy has it got some members now. I remember when there was less than 50 or there about's. I still get out with the scope as mutch as i can, but being poorly for the last couple years has slowed me down a lot. Well I'll leave at that for now, and get some catching UP done. MickyG.
    2 points
  9. Very trying conditions last night! Windy, bad seeing and terrible transparency, but it was clear - beggars can't be... Taken with my Mak and QHY5v with a Tal 2x Barlow. PIPPed, AS!2 to stack and slight tweak of wavelets in R6. Not sure how to combat the beigey colour. Will try a different IR cut filter next time. Another 18 AVis processing whilst I type.
    2 points
  10. It's not the prettiest thing to look at... It's more about what it is than what it looks like - the fact that we can see it at all when it's 2.5 million light years away is pretty stonking... If you can get a view with the 'other two' in as well - M32 and M110 - it looks pretty nice though.
    2 points
  11. That is freaky, that is a perfect description of the dream i used to have..I think they stopped when I was about 6 years old...I wonder if we saw the same program that sparked it..perhaps The Prisoner or maybe a Doctor Who episode... I think we are mutual weirdo's!!
    2 points
  12. Generally as you increase in price you'l get crisper views, then wider views, then crisper wider views, then crisper ridiculously wide views. By crisp, i mean slightly better contrast and less haze (you might not notice these things until you try the new ep). Some eps will have smaller areas of crispness, fading to softer focus at the edge of the field of view, and the distance until the soft area is generally what makes the difference. Cheap eps can give great views, but if they turn soft in the outer 50% of the field of view then they won't be very pleasing to the eye. So you can have cheap
    2 points
  13. I used to have the very same dream as a child, giant ball bearings on flat seemingly endless surface with nothing to hide behind and a strange eerie sound. The most predominant and the only recent one i recall is one where i am wearing glasses but realise that i don't actually need them to see but at the same time i can not take them off, i have in more than one dream forced myself to remove them and realised after a few seconds of focusing my eyes are okay but i still put them straight back to feel comfortable. I had laser surgery in 1997 and wore glasses for 8 years and the only time i took
    2 points
  14. Steve Something else which I dont think gets talked about as much as it should do is getting a good observing 'technique' sorted out. If you are pointing your scope at challenging objects like M33 then some basics like these will make all the difference - Look after your eyes, so really letting your eyes get dark adapted and using very dim red lights to read your Telrad map (dont let laptops/ipads/iphones anywhere near your eyes even if in night mode!). Averted vision, when I first started I thought 'yeah yeah how much difference can it make?! Well it makes a HUGE difference! Scan the area un
    2 points
  15. Very nice. Lovely detail on that central AR. By the weekend I should be able to see the Sun again because the water will have risen so high that the lookout post on my ark will be above the clouds. James
    2 points
  16. The below link offers lots of useful info for the beginner that will help answer lots of questions. OBSERVING BASICS
    2 points
  17. Reprocessed this to try and bring out more colour.
    2 points
  18. Hi guys, Here's an image I shout from the Negev Desert Thus. before last. Seeing was just wonderful – perhaps one of the best ever in that site. I decided to return to an object I truly love, which I haven't visited for more than 3 years now. I tried a different framing on it – one which fits better with my own perception of it as a great heavenly sail, facing strong winds… http://www.pbase.com/boren/image/147368057/original I hope you like it, and any comments are, as always, very welcome! Cheers, Harel
    1 point
  19. Hello to you all, I got into astronomy at the beginning of the year, when Venus, Jupiter and the moon had a party! I immediately rushed out and bought a telescope. Then it became cloudy, then it became summer and now it seems I might finally get to use it properly! I have played around with the scope on the moon mostly and am pleased with the clarity and sharpness. In particular the supplied 25mm eyepiece is super clear but the 10mm is terrible and I want to replace that, but with what?! My newbie questions are: 1) What eyepiece should I get to replace the in the box 10mm one? Budget upto £100
    1 point
  20. Nice video of the 1999 shower. The commentary sounds like it was one hell of a shower compared to captured images on video. I cant wait for this years Geminids. Its my favourite shower. Its been a couple of yrs since i have seen it ..........due to cloud. Fingers crossed for this year.
    1 point
  21. I decided a while back that views through anything with any CA at all and aperture of less than 6" left me unsatisfied. I therefore have three scopes, all dobs which are all as far as I am concerned grab and go. 6" f11, 12" f4 (will be a dob one day) and a 16" f4. Personally I think that a 6" f5 is a really superb scope to have as a dob and really is ready to work immediately at low powers. many of the cheap wide field refractors give OK images but get harder to manage than a 6" f5 dob about about 100mm I feel. and guess what, cheaper refractors work at (you guessed it) low powers.
    1 point
  22. I live at a dark site and, when it's on the zenith (very important!!), the dust lanes split it into three. It won't fit in the field of a 26 Nagler in the half metre Newt because it clearly extends beyond the FOV. In good 8X42 bins it fills more than half the FOV and, after twenty years, still makes my skin prickle and my blood run cold when I consider what I'm looking at. You can see it, 2.9 (modern estimate) million light years away, naked eye. Say that again. Two point nine million lightyears. And with 60 year old indifferent eyes I can look up and see the darned thing. Yikes. I'm a fan. Ol
    1 point
  23. I've received my William Optics guider bracket today.
    1 point
  24. 1 point
  25. here is my grab and go still plenty of aperture but up in about 2 minutes. original 1978 Celestron C8 Orange tube on SkyTee2 The "not so Grab and go" is behind it. Taken at Dalby Starfest this Summer.
    1 point
  26. Have a look at the Explore Scientific 68º. They're on sale in the USA at the moment, i don't own one but have read that they rival Televue Panoptics for a fraction of the price. You would have to add Import Duty, you might get lucky and slip through the net and pay none, even with the extra they seem like a good deal.
    1 point
  27. You are right Carl. About the CCD I mean. I am quite serious, but not at all seriously rich....And the price of some of these astrophotography toys can sting.... And that is why I am so impressed when people like Stan (and others) can make such incredible images from their "semi normal" cameras. I will have to consider your suggestion of work arounds for using my camera in the daytime. I like this idea. But I also saw Mel's image taken with an unmodded camera... I have to say that I find these peoples skill pretty awe-inspiring! chris
    1 point
  28. Possibly true, but only because most people look at Messier DSOs (which are large and bright), usually from light polluted sites (which don't allows for higher magnification). At my dark site I view NGC objects with a 12" f4.9 using focal lengths from 32mm down to 4mm (with 8mm and 6mm being the most used). Most of the objects I look at just aren't visible with anything longer than 20mm. With my old 8" f6 under the same conditions I went down to 8mm on DSOs and did most viewing in the 20-10mm range. The crucial thing is exit pupil rather than focal length (i.e. eyepiece focal length divided by
    1 point
  29. I must have as she's a divorce lawyer :rolleyes2:
    1 point
  30. it plays on every ones mind at least once but once you get a clear night your love will be rekindled
    1 point
  31. I store my C925 horizontally in a big IKEA plastic box. A couple of pillows provide the padding. http://www.ikea.com/...6319/#/90102971 I have never heard of storing the scope horizontally will strain the mirror support. If anything I think storing vertically will strain the focusing mechanism, because the weight of the SCT mirror is supported by the focusing mechanism when the scope is vertical. Anyway, the scope would have been designed for either, so don't worry about it.
    1 point
  32. What a great panorama... Astronomy Picture of the Day andrew
    1 point
  33. Clearly you have got the astronomers bug "aperture fever". While it is possible that you can get a secondhand/ new telescope in the 150-200mm range for less than the cost of building your own, "Built-it-myself" is always a nice moment and you will learn how to make that much larger scope in the future when the 200mm just doesn't cut it anymore. Nigel Wakefield
    1 point
  34. Just out of interest - how do you get those 'spikes' on the main stars - is that some kind of photoshop filter/plugin? I quite like the look - especially for targets like M45 Mike
    1 point
  35. Hi Adam and welcome to Sgl, I would like you to come take a look at are group http://www.eastmidlandsstargazers.org.uk/ We have members forms notts we have a cople a great dark sites and we meet up regular at are dark site at Belper come and join us where a great group cheers pat
    1 point
  36. I had a look at Belelgeuse last night as the cloud was in and out and spoilt the view of M42 that I wanted, and Belelgeuse is one of those Stars that just begs attention..and the other half loved it too. It certainly was redder than i recall from years ago, but not so dramatically that it could not be accounted for by atmospheric seeing and perhaps my aging eyes. However I do know that in the last 18 months there have been new images of Betelgeuse taken that shows the nebular surrounding it to be bigger than thought, highly mobile and increasing in size, and spectroscopic analysis indicates th
    1 point
  37. Totally agree with you Vince. At the moment, most of my observing seems to be with binoculars or my little WO66 which I can get out and setup in a few minutes with zero cool down time. Don't seem to have the time for anything else. How about a little ST80 or similar as a grab and go? Stu
    1 point
  38. Get "bobs knobs" for the secondary - makes it a darned sight easier to collimate and obviates the likleyhood of dropping an allen key down the tube and onto the primary
    1 point
  39. The one on the left has a threaded end to take the 2" filters...and a 1.25" EP the other, will add a bit to the focusor so if you only just get focused inwardly, this might make take it out to far.....works in my scope...
    1 point
  40. Shane gave me an idea, so I put together a little silly version of the One Ring poem. I usually dont do this, but then again I havent slept well all week. *cough*: Three scopes for the photographers under the sky Four for the giants in their halls on Paranal Nine for visual users who dobsonians buy One for the Hubble Lord on his orbital throne In the darkness of space where photons fly One scope to enjoy the stars, One scope to find them One scope to asterisms bring them, and in the darkness align them In the darkness of space where stars die
    1 point
  41. Check out this article on the European Space Agency's VISTA telescope! http://www.extremete...f-the-milky-way They have compiled an single mosaic image made from thousands of pictures taken with the VISTA telescope (VISTA = Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy). The result is a 9 gigapixle image (108,500x81,500) that is 24.6 gigabytes in size!!!! Considered the single most detailed image of the Milky Way ever produced, astronomers have been able to catalog 84 million stars in this picture alone. Using the Infrared capabilities they were able to cut through the dust that occupies
    1 point
  42. Very nice detailed image, good result from the c11.
    1 point
  43. 1 point
  44. A warm welcome to SGL
    1 point
  45. Hi Stingray and welcome Enjoy!
    1 point
  46. Heelo and welcome to SGL Velvet
    1 point
  47. Hi Stingray and welcome to the SGL. Missy.
    1 point
  48. Hi all the names David and I'm Colchester born and bred. Married for 20 years with 2 girls aged 11 & 15. Been into anything astronomy related for as long as I can remember. Had binoculars for years but got my scope xmas 2010. Just coming back to astronomy after 10 months off looking after my wife who has had breast cancer, alls good now though, and of course my tripod broke the other night just as I was about 2 start observing, repair has been made and now, of course it's cloudy grrrr.
    1 point
  49. Just when you thought the service could not get any better ..... Phoned Steve to check on availability for an order. The items were in stock, so while I chatted to him about another matter, I typed the order into his on-line order form. Throughout the conversation, I could hear noises in the background - guess what, it was my order being packed so that it would not miss the post!!! Before I'd even finished typing it in!!! Unless Steve starts sending my orders before I've even phoned, it can't get any better. Needless to say, the items arrived the next day. Thanks Steve and thanks too for the r
    1 point
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