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Showing content with the highest reputation on 23/09/12 in all areas

  1. Hi Guys A couple of crater shots from 8th September: First Tycho and Maginus. This was meant to be part of a mosaic with the Clavius shot I posted before, but I did not have the coverage to do it justice. Second is Plato. Not a good phase at all for picking up the craterlets and I had a few issues with noise in this, but I think it scrubbed up okay? Cheers Nick
    3 points
  2. Quick process of one avi from this morning. Upped the fl to over f31 and quite pleased of the result. This is actual size no drizzle used.
    3 points
  3. My video has made it into the media, they have kindly edited out my excitement http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2207180/Huge-fireballs-shoot-night-sky-spectacular-meteor-shower---turns-probably-space-junk-falling-Earth.html
    3 points
  4. why is our interest in the universe better than someones interest in technology or whatever ppl chose to be interested in. we are no better or worse than someone whose interest means nothing to us. tolerance is the key. just my opinion, make of it what you will Scott
    3 points
  5. Check this frames animated from me motion detect epic and wow!
    3 points
  6. Hi Guys Another image from last Friday/Saturday morning. I have my nice 24" Samsung monitor hooked up to my laptop now so, hopefully, the processing should be a bit better than my last attempt. If you click on the image you will see the 80% resample of the original image (I was finding the noise a bit hard to handle!) Let me know what you think....
    2 points
  7. Morning all. On Friday night I went along to the Norwich Astronomical Society as they were having the first talk of the season which was an introduction to astronomy. The talk was very informative but unfortunately the weather was not so kind so we couldn't do any observing afterwards. So me and my uncle decided to go back last night as the weather was showing clear skies all evening. On the way there i did notice that there was a thin layer of cloud around as you could see it around the moon. I wasn't really holding out for much seeing but we carried on anyway. As we got there i could see a great number of stars and i was starting to think that it was going to be better than I first thought. There were people set-up with there scopes so i had a look through them. The most memorable had to be the ring nebula through a 14" Dob. I also got to see M13 globular cluster, Albireo the double star and Andromeda. The moon looked very nice through my 10X50 bins too! so all in all considering the seeing wasnt ideal i still loved every minute of it and cant wait to get there again! If anyone from the Norwich Astronomical Society is a member on here then i wish to thank you for a very informative and friendly evening!
    2 points
  8. Another clear sky gave me the chance to grab some SII 6 hrs worth Added it to the HA and Oiii i all ready had RCOS 10" with FLIML8300 and Astrodon 3nm Narrowband filters Thanks for looking comments always welcome Les
    2 points
  9. 950 live view frames. Afocal. This is the medium size Large one is linked. http://stargazerslounge.com/uploads/gallery/album_2062/gallery_15786_2062_102620.jpg
    2 points
  10. Cliff, that is seriously good, and makes me feel a lot better about missing it, though i was out with scope (telescope, not the charity) but cloud had the better of it, looks like it might have been a space shuttle tool box
    2 points
  11. Stop pushing it down them. Does no good, just because it interests you doesn't mean it has to interest them. Talking about it will make them less interested, they will visit your neighbours and pay them to install high power security light soon just to keep you quiet. :eek: Bet you would switch off if they talked about their facebook followers and the tweets they had made and read.
    2 points
  12. I think the problem with those people is the great void in their heads.
    2 points
  13. If the film canister also had a reflective inner surface then it would, in fact, be a Cheshire. Such a tool would be used to adjust primary tilt. What is typically called a Cheshire is a combination tool comprised of a sight-tube (the long bit with the cross-hairs) that is for secondary tilt and a Cheshire (that is reflective and does primary tilt). See images: http://www.physiol.o...tionLinks.shtml EDIT: so if you have the combo tool you have the film canister. Most focusers aren't perfect and change slightly in tilt as you rack in and out. As a consequence, it makes the most sense to collimate with the focuser racked to roughly where your high-power eyepieces come into focus. It's at high powers where you'll notice misscollimation most. Collimating the fully extended or fully retracted positions may lead to unusual focuser tilts as the tube is often touching a stopper at those positions.
    2 points
  14. Thats it i captured it with my own modded webcam
    2 points
  15. Hi, Hope can get some feedback from all of you. I am new in astrophotography. Thanks Regards, Tommy
    1 point
  16. Last night guest Julian and I pointed our respective Tak FSQ85s at M33, mine with our Atik 4000 aboard and Julian's with his new Atik460. We'll publish the shoot out ASAP. This has last night's data of an hour per colour and 90 mins Lum but I then resized an older M33 2 panel mosaic from the TEC140 and blended that on top as well. Plenty of data, then!! Out of interest the image follows my usual galaxy workflow of ending with a softly stretched RGB only layer for the background sky and stars. This keeps them small. And here we go... Olly
    1 point
  17. Afternoon everyone! Just placed an order with FLO for my SW 200p!! can't wait! Traded a few emails with SteveB, what a great help. Answered all my questions within 5-10 minutes of asking them. What to look at first.... Thanks for all your help, as usual! Tom.
    1 point
  18. I had my scope out once when I first got it and after removing my eye from the eyepiece found a skunk literally 5 feet away and heading in my direction. Honestly didn't think I could run that fast. Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD
    1 point
  19. My wife snapped this little gem of my myself and my little one gazing at the moon last night. You just gatta love it.
    1 point
  20. Hi guys reading this thread makes me very envious I think this would be the ideal bit of kit for your event http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/SmartAstronomys-Clear-View-Portable-Observatory-Tent-with-Full-Fly-Cover-/350602525105?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item51a189f9b1
    1 point
  21. Heres another ive been processing from 3 RGB runs i had saved on my HD from sept 8th. Seeing wasnt too bad. 60 fps red and green. 30 fps blue. wiwnjupos de rotate. 5x powermate plus filter wheel 11 meters. downsized for more natural smooth appearance. slightly different processing
    1 point
  22. Sky at Night. I have every issue :-) I did get a copy of Sky & Telescope once but prefer S@N. Paul Sent from my GT-I9100P using Tapatalk 2
    1 point
  23. 18 Sep 12 0310 to 0525 Hrs, Europa coming out from eclipse.
    1 point
  24. Just take the linear RGB layer without luminance and stretch it by lifting the bottom of the curve steeply but then flattening it off far earlier than usual. You are trying to lift the background sky to the same values it has in your finished LRGB image while stretching the stars far less than before. Use the colour sampler in Ps to measure the background in both images and adjust the background in the RGB till it is exactly the same in all three channels as the LRGB. Then paste the LRGB onto the soft RGB stretch and try an erasor set to 50% to wipe off the LRGB stars and background around the galaxy. You can see whether to erase the LRGB stars and background completely or partially to taste. Olly
    1 point
  25. Thanks again fellas! Yes Neil I simply blast the secondary for a few secs with the hairdryer. You could always cut a porthole in your OTA and do the same as me. That must be frustrating dealing with moving collimation. The sooner you get that sorted the better. Here is the first shot of that session taken at lower fl of f26 and including (according to stellarium) Ganymede, Callisto & Amalthea :
    1 point
  26. I'm no expert on imaging with a DSLR....but I would try knocking the ISA down, experiment with different setting and exposure lengths. You didn't say how many subs you stacked in this image?
    1 point
  27. The first thing I do when I get out of bed at 04:15 (for work) is look out my bedroom window and lately Venus is right there, if so I grab my 15x70's straight out in the back garden for a scan around for half an hour. Then get a rush on to get ready for work. Not been late yet, but close. When clear, the skies are generally really nice at that time in the morning.
    1 point
  28. Well it's not purely black and white in your picture. You would be able to extract more colour if you stacked more pictures.
    1 point
  29. That's something you have to find within yourself, not something other people can tell you. But how can you be interested in astronomy and not want to get more involved in it? In my experience of people who are interested in the sciences, the desire to know and understand more is all the motivation they need. Sometimes even just to see nature at work (which at the very lowest level is what we're doing when looking through a telescope) is sufficient. And that's before you turn to the Dark Side and start imaging James
    1 point
  30. One note of caution in regard to the gas heater - tents and non-electric based heaters are a disaster waiting to happen (CO and/or fire risk). Play it safe and bring an electric heater only - a simple fan heater will do. Use gas for cooking only. If when you arrive, it turns out you have the wrong power cable, there is an onsite shop that will be there to assist.
    1 point
  31. My seven year old son suddenly developed an interest when he realised it meant staying up late!
    1 point
  32. Well done Lewis - glad you enjoyed your visit to your local [Norwich] astro soc stargazing party - you're one of the few on SGL that seems to engage with local societies which is a pity - I'm unsure why the reluctance - but I expect I'll hear very soon I'm a great fan of local astro socs [mine = Ewell AS in Surrey] and the BAA
    1 point
  33. Check the BBC iplayer, Eastenders is always number one on the list, says a lot about this country
    1 point
  34. Hi Ray , Just had a little play with the adjustments at the end of DSS , there's plenty of data and colour in your image to be dragged out . For a quick idea on a routine for PS tweaking try here . . http://www.astronomy...hp?f=43&t=12269 Steve.
    1 point
  35. And awesome images, they are, Cliff. Intrigued by the lights you captured before the fireball...
    1 point
  36. Been into Astronomy since I was a kid, still get a buzz every time I go out and just look up, never mind turning a scope on a target, I still find myself wondering round the garden looking up, I don't know what drive's it, TBH I really dont care. Having the Astronomy bug is an under statement as far as i am concerned, it's an addiction. I suspect quite a few people on here would feel the same.
    1 point
  37. Hey Andy, thanks for the reply and lookig forward to seeing your results. I use the scope only for visual, and hemce the smeared edge stars are very disturbing. The TS flattener apearsvto work differently than other designs i have seen. The otherd looks like it will be impossible to achieve infinity focus. From what i can see on TS website. You would unscrew the tube from your diaginal, the side that goes into the focuser. Then screw on the flattener. As it does not effect th FL, it does not effect the way the scope focuses. Anyone else can help?
    1 point
  38. How about: M4, It's a globular cluster not a motorway!
    1 point
  39. Probably just the ISS crew getting rid of another defunked fridge as they did in 2007/08. Wonder if they got it from Comet............
    1 point
  40. If you have just a normal none motorised tripod, you will find the longer focal length lens you use the shorter your exposure will have to be to stop star trails, and the easiest way to get started is to use eos utility on a laptop/pc to control the camera via usb lead, this way you will be able to see your results instantly and adjust accordingly, without even touching the camera. SGL is a great place to get advice on your settings/set up, but its equally important to know your equipment well, it will save you time setting up and the occasional embarrassing moment, this coming from a very experienced photographer, who somehow managed to set the aperture to F29 on my lens 2 weeks ago and ruined a whole nights viewing, of which we have had very few over the past few months. It wasn't until I was looking at the RAW files in digital photo professional that I realised what I had done, a big slap to the forehead and a resounding "doh" could be heard
    1 point
  41. Nice shot. Missed out on it in Kent.
    1 point
  42. Here is the Andromeda Galaxy taken on holiday in Brittany. The blooming of the brightest stars was caused by some light high cloud. I quite like seeing deep sky objects in a wider setting. There isn't the detail but surrounded by stars make them seam almost more real in a way. 9 x 4 minutes exposures, 5 darks, AstroTrac, Canon 5D, Canon 300mm, f/5.6, ISO 800, Deep Sky Stacker Eliot
    1 point
  43. hi rory, I've got this one few days ago, and I love it, it's very strong and safe. I got the larger size, a bit heavy. http://www.clasohlson.com/uk/Instrument%20Case/Pr314142000
    1 point
  44. Here is the Pleiades from last night. Looking at the forecast this could be my last image of this holiday. 13 x 4 Minute Lights, 6 Darks, Canon 5D, 300mm Lens, f/5.6, ISO 800, AstroTrac Eliot
    1 point
  45. 1 point
  46. September 2012 Celestial Calendar & Observing Notes c/o Dave Mitsky *NB: Check out also the resources at the end of Dave's calendar for further reading/information* All times unless otherwise noted are UT. 9/1 Venus is 9.0 degrees south of the first-magnitude star Pollux (Beta Geminorum) at 21:00; a double Galilean satellite shadow transit (Europa’s shadow follows Io’s) begins at 23:17 9/3 Asteroid 11 Parthenope (magnitude 8.7) is at opposition at 10:00 9/4 Mercury is at its greatest heliocentric latitude north today 9/7 The Moon is at apogee, subtending 29 arc minutes from a distance of 404,294 kilometers (251,217 miles), at 6:00 9/8 Jupiter is 0.6 degree north of the Moon, with an occultation visible from central and southern South America, at 11:00; Last Quarter Moon occurs at 13:15 9/9 Asteroid 1 Ceres is 0.6 degree south of the Moon, with an occultation visible from western Russia, the Middle East, northern Africa, Europe, Canada and most of the United States, at 9:00; the Curtiss Cross, an X-shaped illumination effect located between the craters Parry and Gambart, is predicted to occur at 12:54 9/10 Mercury is in superior conjunction at 13:00 9/12 Venus is 4 degrees north of the Moon at 17:00 9/13 Venus is 3 degrees north of the bright open cluster M44 (Praesepe or the Beehive) in Cancer at 23:00 9/16 New Moon (lunation 1110) occurs at 2:11 9/17 Pluto is stationary at 21:00 9/18 The Moon is 0.8 degree south of the first-magnitude star Spica (Alpha Virginis), with an occultation visible from most of Antarctica, Mauritius, and the southern Indian Ocean, at 5:00; Saturn is 5 degrees north of the Moon at 14:00 9/19 The Moon is at perigee, subtending 32 arc minutes from a distance of 365,752 kilometers (227,278 miles), at 3:00; Mars is 0.1 degree north of the Moon, with an occultation visible from French Polynesia and central South America, at 21:00 9/22 The autumnal equinox occurs in the northern hemisphere at 14:49; First Quarter Moon occurs at 19:41; The Lunar X (the Purbach or Werner Cross), an X-shaped illumination effect involving various rims and ridges between the craters La Caille, Blanchinus, and Purbach, is predicted to occur at 21:39 9/25 Asteroid 2 Pallas (magnitude 8.3) is at opposition at 3:00 9/27 Mercury is at the descending node today; Venus is at the ascending node today; Neptune is 6 degrees south of the Moon at 11:00 9/29 Uranus (apparent size 3.7", magnitude 5.7) is at opposition at 7:00 9/30 Full Moon (known as the Barley, Corn, or Fruit Moon), this year’s Harvest Moon, occurs at 3:19 Karl Harding discovered asteroid 3 Juno on September 1, 1804. E. E. Barnard discovered Jupiter’s fifth satellite, fourteenth-magnitude Amalthea, using the 36-inch refractor at the Lick Observatory on September 9, 1892. On September 19, 1848, William Bond discovered Saturn’s fourteenth-magnitude satellite Hyperion, the first irregular moon to be discovered. Neptune was discovered by Johann Gottfried Galle on September 23, 1846, using Urbain Le Verrier’s calculations of its position. The zodiacal light, or the false dawn, is visible about two hours before sunrise from a dark site during the latter part of September. The Moon is 14.4 days old and is located in Pisces on September 1 at 0:00 UT. The Moon is at its greatest northern declination (+21.2 degrees) on September 8 and its greatest southern declination (-21.1 degrees) on September 22. Longitudinal libration is at a maximum of +5.6 degrees on September 27 and a minimum of -5.8 degrees on September 13. Latitudinal libration is at a maximum of +6.7 degrees on September 14 and a minimum of -6.7 degrees on September 27. Visit http://saberdoesthes...does-the-stars/ for tips on spotting extreme crescent Moons and http://www.curtrenz.com/moon06.html for Full Moon data. Times and dates for the lunar light rays predicted to occur in June are available at http://www.lunar-occ...o/rays/rays.htm The Sun is located in Leo on September 1. It crosses the celestial equator from north to south on September 22, the date of the autumnal equinox. Brightness, apparent size, illumination, distance from the Earth in astronomical units, and location data for the planets and Pluto on September 1: Mercury (magnitude -1.4, 5.3", 93% illuminated, 1.27 a.u., Leo), Venus (magnitude -4.3, 19.9", 58% illuminated, 0.84 a.u., Gemini), Mars (magnitude 1.2, 5.2", 91% illuminated, 1.80 a.u., Virgo), Jupiter (magnitude -2.3, 39.2", 99% illuminated, 5.03 a.u., Taurus), Saturn (0.8 magnitude, 16.0", 100% illuminated, 10.42 a.u., Virgo), Uranus (5.7 magnitude, 3.7", 100% illuminated, 19.17 a.u., Cetus), Neptune (7.8 magnitude, 2.3", 100% illuminated, 28.99 a.u., Aquarius), and Pluto (14.1 magnitude, 0.1", 100% illuminated, 31.81 a.u., Sagittarius). This month Mercury and Saturn are located in the west, Mars in the southwest, Uranus in the east, and Neptune in the southeast during the evening. At midnight, Jupiter can be found in the east, Uranus in the southeast, and Neptune in the south. Venus is in the east, Jupiter in the southeast, and Uranus in the west in the morning sky. For observers at latitude 40 degrees north at midmonth, Venus rises at 3:00 a.m. local time, Mars sets at 9 p.m. local time, Jupiter rises at 11:00 p.m. local time, and transits the meridian at 6:00 a.m. local time, and Saturn sets at 9:00 p.m. local time. During September, Mercury decreases both in brightness and in apparent size. It is potentially visible, under exceptional conditions, extremely close to the horizon during evening twilight at the very end of the month. Venus shines brightly at minus fourth magnitude and, as September progresses, shrinks in apparent size from 20 to 16 arc seconds. It begins the month in Gemini, starts to traverse Cancer on September 4, and enters Leo on September 23. On the morning of September 12, Venus lies four degrees northeast of a waning crescent Moon and three degrees southwest of the naked-eye open cluster M44. Mars departs Virgo and crosses into Libra on September 4. It passes one degree south of the third-magnitude multiple star Zubenelgenubi (Alpha Librae) on September 14 and is occulted by the Moon on September 19. Mars is only 4.8 arc seconds in apparent size by month’s end. Jupiter increases in apparent size by four arc seconds and brightens from magnitude -2.3 to magnitude -2.5 this month. A double Galilean satellite shadow transit takes place on September 1. Jupiter reaches western quadrature on September 7. The Last Quarter Moon passes very close to the giant planet on September 8. Click on http://www.skyandtel...html?page=1&c=y to determine transit times of the central meridian by the Great Red Spot. Data on the Galilean satellites is available at http://www.skyandtel...pt/3307071.html Saturn disappears into the glare of the Sun this month. Mars and Saturn are ten degrees apart on September 1. Uranus is located just to the southwest of 44 Piscium when it reaches opposition on the evening of September 29 and can be seen without optical aid from a dark site. At that time, Uranus is 0.3 degree north of the celestial equator and approximately 2.6 light hours or 1.77 billion miles from the Earth. Neptune can be found approximately one degree east of the fifth-magnitude star 38 Aquarii on September 1. On September 30, it’s 22 arc minutes southeast of that star. Finder charts for Uranus and Neptune can be found at http://media.skyandt...eptune-2012.pdf and page 50 of the September issue of Sky & Telescope. Pluto is located in northern Sagittarius near the open cluster M25. The dwarf planet culminates during the mid-evening. On September 30, Pluto lies about seven arc minutes from the orange-hued, eighth-magnitude star HD 170120. Detailed finder charts are available on pages 52 and 53 of the June issue of Sky & Telescope and on page 236 of the RASC Observer’s Handbook 2012. For more on the planets and how to locate them, see http://www.nakedeyeplanets.com/ Comet C/2011 F1 (LINEAR) heads southeastward through the constellation of Bootes. The tenth- to-eleventh magnitude comet is located due east of the fourth-magnitude star Zeta Bootis on the night of September 11. For additional information on comets visible in September, browse http://cometchasing.skyhound.com/ and http://www.aerith.ne...t/future-n.html Asteroids 1 Ceres and 4 Vesta shine at ninth and eighth magnitude respectively as they pass through Taurus during September. A finder chart appears on page 53 of the August issue of Sky & Telescope. The eighth-magnitude asteroid 2 Pallas reaches opposition in Cetus at 11:00 p.m. EDT on September 24. Asteroid 11 Parthenope glows at ninth magnitude as it travels southwestward through Aquarius. It reaches opposition on the morning of September 3. The ninth-magnitude minor planet can be found less than one degree due north of the fourth-magnitude star Tau2 Aquarii on the night of September 13. Asteroid 18 Melpomene travels through southwestern Serpens Cauda. The faint asteroid 363 Padua occults Zubenelgenubi during the daytime on September 16. See http://www.skyandtel...-158607465.html for further information. Data on asteroid occultations taking place this month is available at http://www.asteroido.../2012_09_si.htm and http://www.poyntsour.../New/Global.htm A free star map for September can be downloaded at http://www.skymaps.com/downloads.html Eighty binary and multiple stars for September: 12 Aquarii, Struve 2809, Struve 2838 (Aquarius); Alpha Capricorni, Sigma Capricorni, Nu Capricorni, Beta Capricorni, Pi Capricorni, Rho Capricorni, Omicron Capricorni, h2973, h2975, Struve 2699, h2995, 24 Capricorni, Xi Capricorni, Epsilon Capricorni, 41 Capricorni, h3065 (Capricornus); Kappa Cephei, Struve 2751, Beta Cephei, Struve 2816, Struve 2819, Struve 2836, Otto Struve 451, Struve 2840, Struve 2873 (Cepheus); Otto Struve 394, 26 Cygni, h1470, h1471, Omicron Cygni, Struve 2657, 29 Cygni, 49 Cygni, 52 Cygni, 59 Cygni, 60 Cygni, 61 Cygni, Struve 2762 (Cygnus); Struve 2665, Struve 2673, Struve 2679, Kappa Delphini, Struve 2715, Struve 2718, Struve 2721, Struve 2722, Struve 2725 (in the same field as Gamma Delphini), Gamma Delphini, 13 Delphini, Struve 2730, 16 Delphini, Struve 2735, Struve 2736, Struve 2738 (Delphinus); 65 Draconis, Struve 2640 (Draco); Epsilon Equulei, Lambda Equulei, Struve 2765, Struve 2786, Struve 2793 (Equuleus); 1 Pegasi, Struve 2797, h1647, Struve 2804, Struve 3112, 3 Pegasi, 4 Pegasi, Kappa Pegasi, h947, Struve 2841, Struve 2848 (Pegasus); h1462, Struve 2653, Burnham 441, Struve 2655, Struve 2769 (Vulpecula) Notable carbon star for September: LW Cygni Forty-five deep-sky objects for September: M2, M72, M73, NGC 7009 (Aquarius); M30, NGC 6903, NGC 6907 (Capricornus); B150, B169, B170, IC 1396, NGC 6939, NGC 4343, B361, Ba6, Be87, Cr 421, Do9, IC 1369, IC 4996, IC 1516, LDN 906, M29, M39, NGC 6866, NGC 6871, NGC 6888, NGC 6894, NGC 6910, NGC 6960, NGC 6992, NGC 7000, NGC 7008, NGC 7026, NGC 7027, NGC 7039, NGC 7063, NGC 7086 (Cygnus); NGC 6891, NGC 6905, NGC 6934, NGC 7006 (Delphinus); NGC 7015 (Equuleus); M15 (Pegasus); NGC 6940 (Vulpecula) Top ten binocular deep-sky objects for September: IC 1396, LDN 906, M2, M15, M29, M30, M39, NGC 6939, NGC 6871, NGC 7000 Top ten deep-sky objects for September: IC 1396, M2, M15, M30, NGC 6888, NGC 6946, NGC 6960, NGC 6992, NGC 7000, NGC 7009 Challenge deep-sky object for September: Abell 78 (Cygnus) The objects listed above are located between 20:00 and 22:00 hours of right ascension. .................................................................................................................................. *Suggestions for further reading/information:* Check out the following two sites (both are primarily UK-based) - each of which contain excellent celestial guides for the month ahead: Astronomical Calendar Astronomy.co.uk (site includes a short video highlighting some of the main celestial events for the month ahead).
    1 point
  47. My newer LX2OO has an option to use Universal Time UT I use this as it's same as GMT, don't know if older version has this option. Have you tried the 200 GPS Yahoo forum ? Dave
    1 point
  48. I am not sure if I understand your problem but my LX 200 home position is always North, not South. I would also have thought that you can turn daylight saving on and off as many parts of the world don't use it and Meade sell all over the place. There must be others on this site with the LX 200, mine is 4 years old but I don't think they have changed that much. Sorry I can't help more. Alan.
    1 point
  49. Hi Rae, The answers to your questions are: It is an event that runs for several days and nights. Usually starts on a Wedsnesday and lasts through to the following Monday or Tuesday. Most people come on Friday and leave on Sunday afternoon, something to do with work!!! It is mainly tents in the majority of cases, but some have motohomes and caravans. Usually a good crowd of between 150 to 180 people attend. You should get to know about 20 to 30 of the members reasonable well. The majority of the folk are more than willing to let you look through their scopes, will explain imaging and attempt to answer all your questions. As James above explained a helpful bunch!!! So if your don't have a scope that should not be a problem, it is a great place to learn what equipment may be suitable for you. There is a Bring and Buy event on the Saturday morning, plus Talks on various Astronomy subjects run on the Saturday as well. The camp site opened a new cafe at SGL 7 which was a great hit with the punters, cooked breakfasts (English full) were about £4 and dinner was about £5. The Hog Roast on Saturday evening was a fiver, and great value with salad trimmings and rolls!! Plus the campsite shop, will order you newspapers (if you let them know the evening before) and the shop is very reasonably priced, better than a local shop in the next village on price but not on choice. By the way the eggs in the shop are proper fresh eggs and are brillant. I ate a dozen at SGL7.... There is a very friendly pub in the village, which serves excellent meals for between £6 to £10. So what is essential, a tent and gear, a red torch and Jaffa Cakes!! some drinks are also helpful. Finally, it is a first class campsite, with an excellent owner and very friendly staff. Oh, the cost for SGL7 was £13 per night if memory serves me correctly. Trust the above helps with your decision to attend. Cheers Adrian
    1 point
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