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Showing content with the highest reputation on 20/07/12 in all areas

  1. Guys, Found 90% of my old obs reports. Obviously I won't post all, but here's a few. Please note, these where all done pre my PC days. The binocular sketches where done using a pair of old Prinz 10 x 50's. These where a fantastic pair of binos. Gave amazing views at sea. Apologies for the poor scans. had to do em in Grey Scale. paper is that old :-) Enjoy, and no laughing too hard guys. Buzzing that I've found all, or most of my old stuff.
    3 points
  2. I once heard a theory that there are so many Chinese in the world that if they all jumped off a chair at the same time, the combined impact would cause an earthquake! Now what if, instead, they all huffed, and they puffed, and they blew really really hard at the asteroid??!!
    2 points
  3. That must have been one hell of an adreneline rush, wonder if he went whheeeee on the way down :grin:
    2 points
  4. I collimated my 130p yesterday for the first time yesterday. Having never collimated anything before in my life (except perhaps the cat several years ago - but the vet did that one), I researched everything from this wonderful site reading all the links, I was pretty confident that I knew everything. When it came down to it I was well disappointed! The secondary position and tilt was spot-on and the primary needed one tweak of one screw to get plumb centre. And that was that. All those hours of research for just for a small tweak of 1 screw. Somehow I feel cheated. Anyway, the completion of th
    2 points
  5. Just finished Flocking my 200p - used the CloudyNights Guide for the most part but thought a write up would be handy for anyone in SGL whos thinking of doing this - theres a lot of us 200'pers about so might be a good resource for all of us. Whether its worth the effort I'm not sure yet as like all of us the clouds and awful British Summer are precluding any stargazing at the moment but my scope has now gone from this to this believe me - the flash in the photos does not do justice to the difference when looking into the tube- hopefully this will translate well to better contrast when event
    1 point
  6. Taken on the west side of Kos island, Greece, pitch black skies, never seen the milkyway look so incredible. Taken with an unmodded canon 600D, on a fixed tripod, 18mm kit lens set at F3.5, 40 second exposure, ISO 6400, processed in photoshop. My partner did a good job of staying still for the duration of the pic.
    1 point
  7. I'd just like to add another vote for the Nirvana / UWAN's here. I've used the 28mm, 16mm and currently own a 4mm (Nirvana) and they have all performed really well, even with quite fast scopes. There is really not a lot of difference between them and the Naglers unless you have a scope faster than F/5 in which case the Tele Vues are sharper in the outer 10-15% of the field of view. I can quite understand why a noted reviewer on a USA forum could not tell the difference between a 16mm UWAN and a 16mm Nagler at times in the dark !.
    1 point
  8. Friday evening and clear skys here to, first time in eight weeks that I can put a scope outside to cool. Not worth the trouble to drive out of Town as it is still to light, but a two hour session will be a treat If your out have a good one,
    1 point
  9. got my flextube out set up clear skies all around [just need some dark now [about 11.40ish]
    1 point
  10. If you don't mind me asking, why change your loved Hyperion? By all accounts I'd expect it to be pretty fine at f/13. As its a known quantity, it might be worth waiting to see how you like it in whatever frac you get before parting with the dough.
    1 point
  11. Aha! Found it: http://stargazerslounge.com/topic/154581-new-toy/page__st__60#entry1577418 James
    1 point
  12. Hi Russell, a man after my own heart! My favourite campsite in cornwall is St Agnes Beacon, it consists of lots of plots seperated out by trees and bushes, so its very private. But, truth be told, I love wild camping, it can't be beat for clear skies. The coastal path between St Agnes and St Just is so beautiful, and if you're respectful and clean then nobody seems to mind if you camp a night - I've been doing it for over 10 years and never once had a complaint. Finally, the Tinners Arms is my favourite pub in ... well ... the country, i think. It's in Zennor, near st ives, and if you're nice
    1 point
  13. If eye relief is important to you, you should definitely consider Pentax XW and Vixen LVW. Both have 20mm eye relief, which is longer than any 1.25" eyepieces in the TV line except Radian and Delos. With the exception of Delos and Radians, all 1.25" TV have less than 15mm eye relief. Baader Hyperion have 20mm eye relief too and definitely worth considering for a C6.
    1 point
  14. f-ratio depends on pixel size of your camera. MS LifeCam has small pixels and f/10-15 is "optimal" for it. FireFly 0.3 has bigger 6x6 pixels and f/20-25 would "optimal" for it for planetary (for lunar imaging I use half). Similar for 5.6 pixels in Philips SPC. 2x Barlow would quite likely give you bit more than 2x so assume that you need slightly weaker Barlow than math would suggest.
    1 point
  15. The cam works well sans scope, mounted on my guttering to capture partial Milky Way. I have the nose piece adaptor from my Philips SPC880 fitted, removed the IR filter, covered the opening with a Polaroid attachment filter for portraits (clear glass) to protect the ccd. My problem, first, I have managed to figure out Sharp Cap to capture the images (some 30,000 frames) but I can't for the life of me figure out how to stack the frames. All I get in Registax 6 are black screens (saved jpg image) and with Autostackerrt I get absolutely nothing. Couldn't even remotely get AVIStack 2 working or, th
    1 point
  16. The thing I did was to buy a tv plossl 25mm to see how good the view was. It was excellent and then I knew it was worth me investing in an ethos. Once you try a little green it's hard to go back.
    1 point
  17. Do you have a nice pair of bino's? £60 would buy a nice usable 10x50 (or 15x70 if you have big arms) set for low power sky scanning and lunar viewing. You may already have a set but thought it worth mentioning Dave
    1 point
  18. Welcome to SGL, Drew. I read the title of this posting and thought "Hmm. We Come in Peace. Shoot to Kill". And then of course had to go and find out why I associated those two phrases. Which led me to this, and I see no reason I should suffer alone: James
    1 point
  19. Hi Drew and welcome to SGL!
    1 point
  20. Let's take a second to review how an security CCTV camera works. Essentially, the following happens. Start the exposure Gather photons for a set period of time stop the exposure convert the CCD signals to digital format, this adds a bit of uncertainty - or noise, to each reading modulate the digital signal to analog CCTV format, possibly altering the lines/resolution of the resulting picture Repeat this, 25 times a second Now with astro-cams, there are far fewer operations - typically the cycle runs once every few, to few hundred, seconds, so there's less noise added from the fewer digital con
    1 point
  21. Thanks Derek! I'll certainly have that in mind! Flats are troubling me because i suppose you have to have the same orientation relationship camera/telescope from the lights session and the flats themselves, no? so that means either u take them in late afternoon or you wait until late morning of the same day of shooting (because those are the limit times for a blue evened sky, no?) in order to keep the same focus and orientation. I have heard of some other ways with white backgrounds, but im not sure how they work... Thank you tingting, we are equipment buddies! haha I stacked all this info in
    1 point
  22. Hyperions are good for 2 other reasons as well. 1, for just over a tenner you can get a ring that affixes to the top and allows you you but your camera plus T ring direct onto the lens for easy imaging. 2, get the two ext rings 14 and 28mm, which will give you three smaller focal length if fitted individually or together - my 13mm Hyperion then becomes a 10.8mm with the 14mm, 9.2mm with 28mm, and 8.1mm with them both on. Three lense for the price of one (and a bit)
    1 point
  23. For a 6SE I would do the simple option and go for the TV plossl's - assumes that the shorter eye relief is not a problem. The ES and expensive TV's are good however my opinion is that their advantages are at the faster scopes and the 6SE is not fast so why pay out for an aspect that you will not need or meet. Another set to consider is the Astro-Tech Paradigms from Astronomics, I have the equivalent of those and use then on a Meade 105 with great success. At $60 a piece and 6 in the set you could get the lot for about $400 total. The simple green presentation of the TV Plossl's are nice howeve
    1 point
  24. Hi Drew, welcome to sgl Clive
    1 point
  25. Welcome to SGL, Drew
    1 point
  26. Waheey, my astropanel app has just popped up saying ' I can see stars ' Never seen it do that before!
    1 point
  27. But that takes away the fun of scratching your head when the tube ends up pointing at your toes because you punched a wrong digit into the handset.....
    1 point
  28. Are Tele-vue and Pentax worth the money, a question that only you can answer once you have owned one. If you were to buy a 24mm Panoptic to relpace your stanard EP then you would see things that were not there before and all razor sharp. The 24mm Pan is amoung the best Ep's ever made. Pentax also make some excellent Ep's as good as TV, some would say a touch better at some focal lengths but with a smaller FOV and more costly than most Naglers. I am in the process of sorting my Ep's out and all will be changed for Tele-vue, that's how good I think they are. I would try one top end Ep just so y
    1 point
  29. If you want to keep them long term then stick with a handwritten log, preferably a hard back book of some form. You will still have the book in 20 years, digital media changes so quick and can be lost so easily that it is best considered as temporary. Do you have much on your PC from 10 years ago ?
    1 point
  30. Hi there and welcome to SGL
    1 point
  31. Enjoy your holiday Steve, see you at the next meet. Cheers
    1 point
  32. Caldwell and Herschel. They are no harder to find than Messiers, typically. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caldwell_catalogue http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herschel_400_Catalogue
    1 point
  33. Hi Drew and a warm welcome to the Lounge. Steve
    1 point
  34. The Hyperion zoom works great with my 8SE, so forgetting all else................this would be a one stop shop for the scope. If the zoom is too costly................then i can only say that an 8,15,30mm Vixen NPL will also do a great job. Total cost..................about £100. for 3 great EPs.
    1 point
  35. Hi Drew and welcome to the forum. Clear skies James
    1 point
  36. If you decide to get the ES100 degree series I don't think you'd ever find any use for the Hyperion Zoom or any equivalent zoom. This is due to the fact that the apparent field of view is significantly smaller, as well as the fixed focal length EPs being, generally, of higher quality than zooms. Now, I haven't tried the Hyperion Zoom or any other eyepiece than the standard 10 and 25mm that you get with Skywatcher OTAs and the above mentioned ES EPs, but I did do a substantial amount of research before deciding to buy the ES EPs. Even if I wasn't lucky enough to pay no shipping fees or tax dut
    1 point
  37. Hi Bart, Had them awhile, but took pics for someone and figured they might help anyone thinking of buying or upgrading to see the side by side pics. But thanks i'm trying to get a good shot of jupiter at long last. I need luck atm. regards Aenima
    1 point
  38. If you live in the US, you should definitely check out the Explore Scientific eyepieces. Most retailers are having a sale until August, so it might be wize to act sooner rather than later. I picked up the 9, 14 and 20mm of the 100 degree series and a 4.7mm of the 82 degree series for $1k, which I believe will suit me well. Unfortunately, two of the eyepieces turned out to be faulty and had to be sent back, but I've used the 14 and 20mm and I'm very pleased. It should be noted that there are multiple accounts detailing the minuscule differences of the TeleVue Ethos and the Explore Scientific 10
    1 point
  39. I would suggest some orthoscopic eyepiece`s for planetary
    1 point
  40. Hello Drew and welcome to SGL, and thanks also for letting us know a bit about you. I hope you find the answers you want here on the forum and feel free to ask anything, we are a friendly, if sometimes, opinionated bunch, so you may not get the response you hope for!!! :grin:
    1 point
  41. A quick google revealed it comes with the Huygenian eyepieces, the most basic type, and has a standard 1.25 inch focuser. So new eyepieces should help, have a look at the sticky in this forum for advice on the ones to get. As a small refractor, it's always going to be a bit limited, but at f/15 there should be next to no false colour at least.
    1 point
  42. There are newer like MS LifeCam Studio/Cinema that are better for Moon and "should be" better for planetary. There is also FireFly sale on eBay. Cheap mono "dedicated" camera, not a webcam, but has lower gain values than average planetary camera.
    1 point
  43. Starlight Xpress have announced a change of address and change of ownership (don't worry, this is good news) For details please see our News section. It is good to see a wholly UK-owned, UK-based manufacturer of premium quality imaging cameras doing so well!
    1 point
  44. looking fab mate!!! you have all the same equipment as me!!! i have the SW130p and cannon 1000d, but i think my AZGOTO mount is going to let me down as i have been told i am not going to be able to image any nebula with this mount loving your 1st attempts tho mate!!! what program did u stack with?
    1 point
  45. You are FAR ahead of me I am afraid. My advice would be useless Great looking capture, I like space to be dark so I prefer the second image to the first but you did capture a lot more 'dust' or 'glow' in the first image... so I am uncertain which is better. Both better than anything I have done. I would be chuffed if I was you.
    1 point
  46. 1 point
  47. Does this post double up as an eye test?
    1 point
  48. Yesterday I wanted to take images of NGC 7288 using a Takahashi FSQ106 on my EQ6. A small problem showed up. My neighbour has a 'pretty' conifertree of about 4,5m high next to my garden. This tree is almost exactly in the north and polaris is just striking past it, so normally that is no problem. NGC 7288 is rising low in the northeast and so it's hidden behind the tree in the early evening. So I decided to move the scope half a meter backwards to make more exposures. Than I had a problem, because polaris was hidden behind the tree, which I discovered when performing the pole alignment with t
    1 point
  49. Probably the best investment in astronomy I have made is in campig kit. No eyepiece or scope yet made can overcome light pollution for the visual astronomer and a 4" frac under apeerless sky will thrash most big scopes under light pollution hell. Camping is a minefield though and over a few years I have acquired more and more gear which includes camp beds, thermal rolls to put on the camp beds and sleeping bags which cost as much as most mid range scopes. On top of that has been stuff like tent heaters, cooking gear, lights, mains power adapters, tent carpets, camping chairs, water carriers,
    1 point
  50. Got fed up of clouds and suffering a bit from Jupiter withdrawal, so reworked on some videos I took back in February. Equipment: 200p dob, 2x barlow and SPC880NC webcam. Software: Sharpcap, Virtualdub, Castrator, Autostakkert (about 400 frames stacked and 1.5 drizzel), Registax and Photoshop.
    1 point
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