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Showing content with the highest reputation since 29/10/19 in Blog Comments

  1. 5 points
    Half round file Stu- one with fine teeth and gently and patiently- very easy to catch the edge and bend it. Here it is in the spider- I’m about to fit it to the tube- hope I didn’t mess up any measurements
  2. 3 points
  3. 3 points
    Moved it to D6- that did the trick. think it should be strong enough 30D8DFF2-43AC-478B-AA75-B980CEC1CC78.MOV
  4. 2 points
  5. 2 points
    Second time lucky- I ordered some ss mudguard washers and turned them to size this time and the soldering went perfectly I also discovered that the citric acid I bought to descale my kettle works great for removing borax flux Just need to not make a balls up of bending the edge over now...
  6. 2 points
    AKA the pencil sharpener All ready for the hand-controller...
  7. 1 point
    Absolutely. Looking through Plossl initially confused me as it was very difficult for a newbie like me, let alone completely unaware family mambers, to see anything. Viewing through the Baader piece is so much nicer. I may be losing a little bit of view quality but it still makes it much more accessible.
  8. 1 point
    Circuit Diagrams :- Cooling :- The Peltier TEC is run continuously on a low level at about 5v to stop the camera overheating in the thermal insulation. For night viewing, the TEC is run from the full supply of 13.8v switched by a GPIO pin on the RPi. The J438 P-channel MOSFET is turned on via the EL8217 opto-coupler providing the full supply voltage to the TEC. Dew Heater control :- In this case the dew heater is connected directly to the main supply and the return is switched by an N-channel MOSFET (IRLZ44N) to control it. Again the power circuits are isolated from the delicate RPi data side with an opto-isolator.
  9. 1 point
    PARTS LIST :- Camera :- ZWO ASI 178MC USB 3.0 Colour Camera Lens :- All Sky Lens for QHY5-II and 1/2 Inch Camera Dome :- 3.5" Clear Acrylic CCTV Dome Case :- 3D Printed Case Sealant :- Gorilla Versatile Mould-Resistant Sealant, Clear Desiccant :- Dry & Dry 10 Gram [25 Packets] Premium Silica Gel Orange Indicating(Orange to Dark Green) Silica Gel Packets Desiccant Dew Heater :- Dew Heater Module - All Sky Camera Peltier TEC :- Peltier Module, 54.6W, 4.4A, 20V, 40 x 40mm Waterblock :- CPU Water Cooling Block, Waterblock Liquid Cooler 50mm Copper Base for Intel/AMD Coolant :- XSPC XS-EC6-CL Non Conductive Coolant - Clear Radiator :- BQLZR 80 Row PC CPU CO2 Water Cool System Heat Exchanger Radiator Fan :- Coolink SWiF2-800 Fan 80 x 80 x 25 cm Water Pump :- Decdeal Mini Brushless Water Pump DC12V 5W Ultra-quiet Waterproof Submersible Fountain Aquarium Circulating 280L/H Lift 300cm Computer :- Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ MicroSD card :- SanDisk Ultra 16GB microSDHC Memory Card + SD Adapter with A1 App Performance up to 98MB/s, Class 10, U1 HAT :- DIY Proto HAT Shield for Raspberry Pi 3 and Raspberry Pi 2 Model B/B+ / A+ KB 5v PSU :- LM2596 DC to DC Buck Converter 3.0-40V to 1.5-35V Power Supply Step Down Module
  10. 1 point
    Hi Gina, I've got the Raspberry Pi - now all I need is a telescope, mount and CCD camera! Seriously, though, great post Ian
  11. 1 point
    Well done, turned out good in the end. Very neat join and well done on the folded edge, that can be tricky to get right.
  12. 1 point
    Perfect nice job done there
  13. 1 point
    @Gina et all, I have just released astroberry-diy drivers (including focuser, relays and system info). This version is independent of WiringPi and BCM2835 low level control libraries. Instead I decided to use the latest libgpiod, which uses mainland kernel character device. This makes the driver totally independent from any external library. As for now the driver need some testing so it is kept in separate branch. As soon as you test it and confirm it works ok I will move it to master branch and release debian packages. You can grab the source code by running: git clone https://github.com/rkaczorek/astroberry-diy.git cd astroberry-diy git checkout libgpiod Make sure that you have libgpiod-dev package installed before compiling this version. The compilation should go smoothly by running: mkdir build && cd build cmake -DCMAKE_INSTALL_PREFIX=/usr .. make make install Please let me know if it works as designed
  14. 1 point
    Add bs=8M when using dd bs it stands for block size - it will significantly shorten the time
  15. 1 point
  16. 1 point
  17. 1 point
    Change into the astroberry-diy directory before running the second command? James
  18. 1 point
    Run the following to grab the version with BCM support: git clone https://github.com/rkaczorek/astroberry-diy.git git checkout 3283e99
  19. 1 point
    I've just done the same with mine but ran it by ssh'ing into the pi itself it returned a lot of drives but it is 128GB card astroberry@astroberry:~ $ sudo fdisk -l [sudo] password for astroberry: Disk /dev/ram0: 4 MiB, 4194304 bytes, 8192 sectors Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes Disk /dev/ram1: 4 MiB, 4194304 bytes, 8192 sectors Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes Disk /dev/ram2: 4 MiB, 4194304 bytes, 8192 sectors Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes Disk /dev/ram3: 4 MiB, 4194304 bytes, 8192 sectors Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes Disk /dev/ram4: 4 MiB, 4194304 bytes, 8192 sectors Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes Disk /dev/ram5: 4 MiB, 4194304 bytes, 8192 sectors Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes Disk /dev/ram6: 4 MiB, 4194304 bytes, 8192 sectors Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes Disk /dev/ram7: 4 MiB, 4194304 bytes, 8192 sectors Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes Disk /dev/ram8: 4 MiB, 4194304 bytes, 8192 sectors Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes Disk /dev/ram9: 4 MiB, 4194304 bytes, 8192 sectors Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes Disk /dev/ram10: 4 MiB, 4194304 bytes, 8192 sectors Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes Disk /dev/ram11: 4 MiB, 4194304 bytes, 8192 sectors Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes Disk /dev/ram12: 4 MiB, 4194304 bytes, 8192 sectors Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes Disk /dev/ram13: 4 MiB, 4194304 bytes, 8192 sectors Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes Disk /dev/ram14: 4 MiB, 4194304 bytes, 8192 sectors Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes Disk /dev/ram15: 4 MiB, 4194304 bytes, 8192 sectors Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes Disk /dev/mmcblk0: 119.3 GiB, 128043712512 bytes, 250085376 sectors Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes Disklabel type: dos Disk identifier: 0xd9b3f436 Device Boot Start End Sectors Size Id Type /dev/mmcblk0p1 8192 532479 524288 256M c W95 FAT32 (LBA) /dev/mmcblk0p2 532480 250085375 249552896 119G 83 Linux Disk /dev/zram0: 64 MiB, 67108864 bytes, 16384 sectors Units: sectors of 1 * 4096 = 4096 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes Disk /dev/zram1: 64 MiB, 67108864 bytes, 16384 sectors Units: sectors of 1 * 4096 = 4096 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes Disk /dev/zram2: 64 MiB, 67108864 bytes, 16384 sectors Units: sectors of 1 * 4096 = 4096 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes Disk /dev/zram3: 64 MiB, 67108864 bytes, 16384 sectors Units: sectors of 1 * 4096 = 4096 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes astroberry@astroberry:~ $
  20. 1 point
    Here's probably best: https://github.com/WiringPi/WiringPi/releases It looks as though Gordon is no longer developing WiringPi, so I imagine the github site will be the primary source now. James
  21. 1 point
    Wow. There's a blast from the past. Back in the day Gordon Henderson and I used to hang around some of the same mailing lists (where "the day" was twenty years ago or more). James
  22. 1 point
    I have a fuller scopes 6inch newtonium in my shed my very first decent telescope with b class mirror now unused, brings back memories of some very enjoyable nights viewing
  23. 1 point
    Starting the year with a widefield narrow band rig with 135mm f2.5 Asahi Super Takumar Lens as used on vintage SLR film cameras such as the Pentax Spotmatic. These are superb quality lenses even at full aperture and all my imaging has been with full aperture. Camera - ZWO ASI 1600MM-Cool with ZWO EFW and Astrodon 3nm filters. Rig mounted on EQ8 and without guiding at first. Capture with RPi 3 running INDI firmware and saved in Linux Mint desktop indoors running KStars/Ekos.
  24. 1 point
    That's pretty much how my D-Bot is. The wheels are on diagonally opposite corners. With a heavy bed it's best to use 1mm pitch screws to avoid 'back-driving' when power is removed or z motor(s) de-energised. That's assuming 1 motor per screw. If just 1 motor with screws driven by belt/pulley arrangement then steeper screws may be ok.
  25. 1 point
    A bed weight of several KG would be better supported on 3 threaded rods I reckon and guided with metal wheels on two 20mm x 20mm V-Slot extrusion rails.
  26. 1 point
    I'm no longer sure about using the C-Beam and Gantry Plate system in view of the cost mainly though if I decide to change the Z axis on the Concorde I would have most of the parts to transfer from Concorde to Giant. The Concorde printer Z drive system does not appear to be performing as well as I had expected though I'm not sure the rail system is the cause, I have some investigations to do.
  27. 1 point
  28. 1 point
    Wow, amazing job. That rim holding the mirror in is so neat, and evenly trimmed, how did you do that?
  29. 1 point
  30. 1 point
    Thanks Stu gave it a coat of hi-temp exhaust paint which seems about as matt as you can get (or I’ve found anyway)
  31. 1 point
  32. 1 point
    Well that went easier than I thought
  33. 1 point
  34. 1 point
    Very cool. Congrats! Rob
  35. 1 point
    Oh no! It was looking so good in the first few pictures Mark. Hope you find the right way of doing it next time!
  36. 1 point
    Here is a photo of the printer I've just taken.
  37. 1 point
  38. 1 point
    Great advice on the start post and I do tend to agree about the ease of a Mak (obvs as my main scope is now a 150 Mak!). To add a bit of further balance, my first scope was a Celestron 'First Scope' a mini Dob brand new for £50. This did the trick for me as the Moon, Jupiter, Venus and Mars were all visible through it (with pretty rubbish stock eps) and made me want more. I then went to a 150 Dob and although it was good it is not as good (in my opinion) as the 150 Mak. Granted, my Mak is on a GOTO mount which makes it FANTASTICALLY easy to find stuff, but the views I have had through the Mak of the planets have been awesome and has even got me looking at DSOs - something I found not so easy with my Dob. So, I would concur that a 127 Mak would make a great starter setup but equally you wouldn't need to spend even that amount to get the bug - a decent set of bins would also do the trick - I certainly agree that jumping straight to a 200mm Dob may not be the wisest choice for a total noob. As loads of people will say: the best scope is the one you use the most. On that measure my 'best' scope is my ST80 as I use that even on holiday abroad and can set it up in minutes...
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