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  1. Past hour
  2. nil desperandum . This is the cure all in two parts :- 1. According to Douglas Adams, I quote " 85% of all known worlds in the Galaxy, be they primitive or highly advanced, have invented a drink called jynnan tonnyx, or gee-N'N-T'N-ix, or jinond-o-nicks, or any one of a thousand or more variations on the same phonetic theme. The drinks themselves are not the same, and vary between the Sivolvian 'chinanto/mnigs' which is ordinary water served at slightly above room temperature, and the Gagrakackan 'tzjin-anthony-ks' which kill cows at a hundred paces " 2. https://www.craftginclub.co.uk/join-freeginspecial?om_campaign=omme_de8a9efc-b34_1816_3101&om_send=72c0b67ce098420495697aefbc72fcf8&utm_campaign=omme_de8a9efc-b34_non_members_free_gin_170519&utm_content=freegin170519&utm_medium=email&utm_source=ometria Jeremy.
  3. 23mm Axiom LX is a nice eyepiece. I bought mine used also and used it in my Skywatcher collapsible 8”. For the heavy eyepieces, I found some varying weight magnets I could stick on the bottom of the tube opposite the focuser side to balance it out a little better. 1/4 lb, 1/2 lb, 1 lb, etc Guess that would 115 grams, 230 grams, 460 grams or so by using combinations of the magnet sizes it was easy to balance the dob with heavy eyepieces. Never experienced issues or focuser problems or anything. The 8” Skywatcher dob is pretty hardy. The magnets just allowed me to use less tightening of the tension handle and made movement a little smoother.
  4. so whats the method for getting the offset right?
  5. thanks Paul, im sure we get some action soon mate, sols had to have a little rest after the activity of the past weeks, its getting on a bit . clear skys. mate
  6. Thanks for asking the question Palazer, I've found the replies really interesting, actual user feedback in detail with images. To get the very best within a specific budget, have you considered buying eyepieces secondhand ? I've amassed an very nice collection from adverts on SGL, AstroBuySell and Ebay. Many at around 50% of new cost. They had all been very well looked after, indistinguishable from new. I now have a really good appreciation of why there is such a variation in price . I'd always wondered why the best ones cost even more than good quality telescopes, but now I know.... I started off with a set of Meade 4000 Plossls which I was quite happy with, until I tried (genuine) ultra wide angles and 2" eyepieces. The difference in the perceived fov and clarity was amazing. The targets aren't simply bigger, you actually feel that you're nearer. My latest acquisition, a 23mm 2" Celestron Axiom LX 82 degree is now my favorite, it's ridiculously bulky and weighs half a kilo, but the views it gives through my 200PDS and 300P makes them seem like completely different scopes. It cost me £85 via an SGL classified advert from a very conscientious first owner, less than half retail. ...and a word of warning, .... don't buy or make an eyepiece case, you won't be able to resist wanting to fill it !!!
  7. I only spotted my first NLCs (from 53 deg N), last year, on the night of July 15. To the naked eye they were only a ghostly blur just above the horizon, but the camera showed them in their full glory. A shot with my Canon EOS 80D and Samyang 10mm F/2.8 Same clouds with the Canon EOS 80D and 50mm F/1.4
  8. Hi, and a warm welcome to SGL. If you are into Astronomy, then you are not just a simple girl. You will learn much from these forums, and the members here are very helpful, and very knowledgeable in all the sciences that encompass Astronomy. We look forward to reading your posts, and learning much about the area where you live. You may well be the only Bangladesh member here, but I am not certain about that. Enjoy your stay here, and keep us informed of your progress, and don't forget to ask questions If you need to,they love to provide answers here . Best Wishes. Ron.
  9. He did, but he also ended up buying a TEC140 instead for this focal length... (Slight difference in price, though!) Olly
  10. "i've seen eyepieces for sale that "guarantee" bringing out the colour in nebula etc"... There are a lot of filters on the market that increase the contrast of colours, but I have not heard of an eyepiece that does it. As Waldemar states, we use the rods around the outside of the eyes to get night vision, and rods are not colour sensitive. It is a shame we have that limitation in our eyes as seeing colour in the stars would be amazing. I can not see (no pun intended) how looking through any EP could change what the Rods pick up.
  11. Best move, I think. Good luck. Olly
  12. Thanks so much Alan. This sounds like mine and ours appear to be produced consecutively
  13. Today
  14. My replacement filter arrived yesterday morning - no rush to replace it as yet, we've not had Sun for a few days. Will need to watch a video or two to make sure I know what I'm doing....
  15. I am hoping i read your question right, \It might be a bit basic, but is what i found worked for myself. I have a 10 inch Dobsonian, For myself to get a full view of the whole moon i found the 25mm gave me the full moon in the eye piece with a little room to spare. I have found i need what they call moon filters to view the moon due to the brightness of it. But for the planets i use what is called a baader neodymium ir-cut filter, found this gave a good crisp image of Jupiter and Saturn. It is not the cheapest filter, but one i managed to pick up at a good price a good while ago. Eye piece for planets i found 10 mm was good, if seeing is great you can go with a barlow. I like the Tele Vue Delos eyepieces, but they are not the cheapest, see how you go with the two supplied eye pieces first.
  16. This is a combination I've used and enjoyed alot too; you keep the better eye relief of the long focal length ortho but keep the sharpness (as long as your Barlow is decent).
  17. I have a couple of SW scopes and just got the ED finder for guiding, that works nicely. I have always thought SW scopes are nice in the optics department without being Lzos quality, though they seem to let themselves down somewhere on most things. The Mak180mm which I got a few years back has the old style Mak thread and had the most awful visual back I have ever seen, so cheap I binned it then bought a SC thread converter and put my Meade visual back on it. Whilst the focuser on the M/N 190mm is not the worlds best I do feel it sort of does the job for many smaller cameras. It doesn't stop there though with some, as many people want large chip CMOS and CCD's as well as filter wheels and other bolt ons like OAG's, here I could see the wheels coming off
  18. Jon, I used to have the files on my Dropbox account, but it looks like I must have deleted them. I can put them back there this evening when I get home from work. In the meantime, here’s the QSI (now part of Atik) website support page with their email address: https://qsimaging.com/support/technical-support/. They might well sort you out quicker than I can if you fire a nice email at them! Good luck, well worth the upgrade. I’m looking for an email address for support to upgrade my skies... and now we are about to enter two months of no astronomical darkness... I despair!
  19. Thanks very much for the insights. It's a very good point - that if I were moving to narrowband imaging, e.g. using Ha/OIII/SII pallet, achromatic refractor could actually be a low budget choice. It is a bit disappointing that both luminance and blue channels would be affected - so it looks achromatic is certainly a show stopper for LRGB imaging. I'll probably just focus on finding a apo that suits me.
  20. The key difference between them is that the Ed80 & Ed120 are F/7.5 , while the ed100 is F/9, which makes it a bit slow for AP. So you'll find numerus photos with the ed80, as a great starter scope, and many with the ed120 (however less than the ed80 due to larger image scale and mounting requirements), but not as many with the ed100, which is oriented more towards visual.
  21. People (especialy vendors) who tell you things like that are just plain liers or they have no idea what they are talking about. It is physically impossible to see colours in the dark, because your are eyes are not capable of doing that, point. Some people think they see colours, but that is a trick of their brain... more like wishfull thinking. The only way to see the colours of DSO objects is to image them, which is quite a challenge with your set up... not impossible, but quite a challenge... The best advice I could give you is to buy the book: 'Making every photon count' by Steve Richards. It will help you to understand 'what, when and why', and will make your journey into imaging a LOT easier (and cheaper...).
  22. Great start there, Steve. Just one thought ... using a single (50s) dark will not achieve very much, except possibly adding noise. You really do need to take a batch (10 is ok) to average out the noise and remove it from the final image.
  23. Nice result. And a few tiddlers in there as well.
  24. Hello and welcome. Peter
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