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About This Club

Meetings are monthly, free and visitors are always welcome. We've been holding meetings in Edinburgh since 1924 and still going strong.

  1. What's new in this club
  2. until
    Talk by Dr Paul Dalgarno, MPhys PhD CPhys, Associate Professor of Physics at Heriot Watt University . Black holes remain one of the most fascinating and intriguing phenomenon of the universe. On the one hand they are conceptually amazingly simple, on the other we still know very little about the detailed complexity around them. This talk will discuss the history of our understanding of black holes, some of the main properties of them and touch on some of the deeper questions connected to them. Regular meetings are held monthly and are open to members and non-members. Admission is free and visitors are always welcome. Also at our meetings: What's in the night sky this month News of what's happening in the world of astronomy and space Occasional member presentations Tea/coffee and chat afterwards
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    Talk by Dr Andrew Dennis, Director of Product Management at Andor Technology. When we think of Astronomy we think of beautiful Astrophotograpy images, but behind the scenes there are usually a vast array of “technical” cameras which ensure the telescope remains aligned, perform deep Astronomical analysis or produce details of the chemical composition of far off worlds. To make a Hollywood analogy, these cameras could be considered to be the Screenplay writers, Producers, Visual effects engineers of the Astronomy world, without these cameras the “lead actors” simply couldn’t perform. Regular meetings are held monthly and are open to members and non-members. Admission is free and visitors are always welcome. Also at our meetings: What's in the night sky this month News of what's happening in the world of astronomy and space Occasional member presentations Tea/coffee and chat afterwards
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    Talk by Dr Aleks Scholz, University of St Andrews. The talk will give a brief overview of the star and planet formation process and detail the scientific goals of our citizen science project which monitors nearby young star clusters with amateur telescopes. We will show some of our recent results and explain how to participate in our research.
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    For members only We will be discussing field of view, pixel scale, ISO, gain and levels stretching.
  6. Juniper Green Village Hall, Edinburgh 7:30pm Members only for these meetings
  7. The annual Doors Open Days at the Royal Observatory Edinburgh will take place on Sat & Sun 29, 30 from 10am to 5pm September this year. Once again Society members will be taking part by bringing telescopes along for members of the public to observe the Sun - if clear! More information from the ROE here: http://www.roe.ac.uk/whatsnew/event/20180929/
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    Talk by Dr Alan Penny, University of St Andrews Free admission and visitors always welcome. The Primary Objectives And Purposes Of METI International Are To: Conduct scientific research and educational programs in Messaging Extraterrestrial Intelligence (METI) and the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI). Promote international cooperation and collaboration in METI, SETI, and astrobiology. Understand and communicate the societal implications and relevance of searching for life beyond Earth, even before detection of extraterrestrial life. Foster multidisciplinary research on the design and transmission of interstellar messages, building a global community of scholars from the natural sciences, social sciences, humanities, and arts. Research and communicate to the public the many factors that influence the origins, evolution, distribution, and future of life in the universe, with a special emphasis on the last three terms of the Drake Equation: (1) the fraction of life-bearing worlds on which intelligence evolves, (2) the fraction of intelligence-bearing worlds with civilizations having the capacity and motivation for interstellar communication, and (3) the longevity of such civilizations. Offer programs to the public and to the scholarly community that foster increased awareness of the challenges facing our civilization’s longevity, while encouraging individual and community activities that support the sustainability of human culture on multigenerational timescales, which is essential for long-term METI and SETI research.
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    Talk by Alex Pratt, BAA Meteor Section Free admission and visitors always welcome. Visual observation of meteors has been a popular pastime for amateur astronomers for many decades. Using the naked eye, sometimes assisted by film and digital cameras, observers have contributed to our knowledge of the annual meteor showers. However, interest in visual observations is dwindling because of the extent of light pollution across our towns and cities. Increasing numbers of observers are using video cameras, which can record meteors from suburban locations and in moonlight. Alex has observed meteors for many years, is on the Committee of the BAA Meteor Section and is a member of the IMO. He is co-founder of NEMETODE, a network of video meteor cameras in the British Isles. His talk outlines the developments from visual work, film and digital cameras, to video techniques and describes setting up a video meteor station. The talk includes results from meteor cameras operating across Scotland.
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