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"GinaRep Giant Mk 3" 3D Printer

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Gina

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Following on from my Giant Mk 2 printer this version has a number of changes that warrant a new blog.

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This first photo shows the main framework of the printer plus print bed Z carriage frame and XYZ drive systems. The external dimensions are 750mm x 660mm x 1000mm. The frame parts are 20mm x 20mm aluminium extrusion designed for wheels to run on. The X rail is wider at 40mm x 20mm for extra precision. The printing capacity will be 490mm x 470mm x 650mm (or maybe slightly more).  Most printed parts are PETG with the exception of the Z drive gears which are PLA for the large gear and TPU for the motor pinion.  Also, the parts cooler air duct is in ABS for that ability to "solvent weld" it in parts.

This printer is different in some ways from most 3D printers. The X and Y drives are combined in an arrangement called CoreXY where one stepper motor provides X+Y motion and the other X-Y motion. The drive is by standard timing belts and pulleys.  The Z drive is different - it uses fishing line braided cord which is very strong, with negligible stretch. Cords are attached to the 4 corners of the bed frame, go up over pulleys and onto a horizontal aluminium tube that acts as an axle/drum where the cord is wound up to lift the bed. This is driven by gearing with a 10:1 ratio from the Z stepper motor.

224791583_MainframeworkDrives.JPG.f762caa0a0a4e8ebafbf4aa40348aebc.JPG

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Rough bed levelling is achieved with guitar pegs in the bed corners.  Precise bed levelling is assigned to the automatic bed level compensation in the control board.

1116619425_BedlevelAdjuster1.JPG.6297dba8e6aa12f7ddfe007fa8318359.JPG1626446003_BedlevelAdjuster2.JPG.e38b307a263a2564458cf5fe19aaa91e.JPG

Edited by Gina

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Designed and been printing links for a cable chain.

424168771_Screenshotfrom2018-12-2015-18-47.png.895b0665cf2cb689644741c7716845dd.png1621583849_CableChainb.JPG.3025af96f81491bbdfef350613812dd7.JPG1314476217_CableChaina.JPG.0acaaa77b33ac532c92214db5b4721ad.JPG1469573266_CableChainc.JPG.e20cc90a3d1ec0b5ca76e8a83f16b855.JPG1547580805_CableChaind.JPG.1e8b1f02d00aaf29885f5c67bf64279a.JPG

 

Edited by Gina
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Printing cable chain links on my GinaRep Titan 3D printer.

1381015245_PrintingCableChainLinks.JPG.f8ea151e67368c34ef0e7e7e86e00a01.JPG

Edited by Gina

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Update on cable chain and umbilical.

1384316661_CableChaino.JPG.c6b771b9558e8662d6d8729e9bdc3a9e.JPGUmbilical.JPG.dd18a2057d84198465e504fe701c7a60.JPG

Edited by Gina

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Now looking at the location of other parts - PSU, control box/board, water reservoir & pump and fume vent/fan.  Checked up on the Duet 2 WiFi control board that I'm using for mounting and cooling advice.

Quote

Cooling

The PCB is designed to transfer heat from the stepper drivers and power mosfets to the underside of the board. Therefore your mounting method should encourage good airflow underneath the board.

If you mount the board vertically, make sure that cool air can enter at the bottom of the board, flow upwards behind the board, and escape at the top. Convection cooling will usually be sufficient, but if you are using high stepper motor currents then you may wish to add a fan below the board to encourage the upward flow of air. Make the spacing between the back of the board and the panel or enclosure large enough to allow a good flow of air.

If you mount the board horizontally then a cooling fan is recommended, especially if there are other heat-generating components in the vicinity such as power supplies, SSRs or stepper motors. Position the fan to blow air underneath the board (optionally along the top as well), especially along the row of stepper driver chips and between the power input and bed heater terminal blocks.

Important! The higher the motor currents you set, the more important it is to cool the board. Always use a cooling fan if you run a Duet 2 Wifi or Duet 2 Ethernet above 2.0A motor current.

My other printers currently have the board mounted vertically and open but I would prefer to have a box round the board for protection.  Previously, I have had the board mounted in a box vertically with a fan behind it - so lots of cooling - but the orientation looked untidy and it was difficult to connect the wiring.  I would prefer to have the board mounted (in a box) horizontally on top of the printer, though it could go on the side and vertically but again the connections would be awkward.  Mounting the board horizontally with air blown across underneath the board seems overall best, I think.

Edited by Gina

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Here is a diagram of how the parts are to be laid out on the top of the printer.

Key :-

  1. Filament Reel (4.5Kg) - Black
  2. Fume Fan - Red
  3. Water Reservoir - Blue
  4. Control Box = Yellow
  5. PSU - Green

1146382864_Screenshotfrom2018-12-2818-58-46.png.ada0023e57d2ff06a5d30fa367ccdff1.png

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Filament reel support added.  This shows a 4.5Kg reel of filament.

2047638999_ReelSupport05.JPG.e0b4b2c311865407bcb54eba2fe9c2fa.JPG1012750088_ReelSupport02.JPG.b0eca1f7b9703cbc6b674094b3ddb915.JPG356107607_ReelSupport01.JPG.9cf1c63e8586f279788593feb86f53fc.JPG

Edited by Gina

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