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Discovery by Caroline Herschel - 1783 ( Sculptor Galaxy, NGC 253 )

The Discovery of the Sculptor Galaxy by Miss Caroline Herschel in 1783

On the 23rd of September 1783, sitting before her telescope in the field behind the house she shared with her brother William in Datchet near Slough in the south of England, Miss Caroline Herschel "swept" the sky searching for new comets and never before seen star clusters and nebulae.   On this occasion, way down in the sky, not far above the Southern horizon, Miss Herschel saw and noted down a very bright and large nebula where one had never before been recorded and that was later recognised by her brother, Sir William, as the discovery by Caroline Herschel of the nebula he listed in his catalogue as H V.1.

IMG_1600.JPG.ef6fff7fb0c8075751a941d564020b9f.JPG circ. 1825-33, Sir John Herschel, beloved nephew of Miss Caroline Herschel ) 

Today we know this 'nebula' to be, not as some thought then, a swirling mass of stars and gases within our own galaxy, but rather, a galaxy not unlike our own but way more distant than the outer reaches of of own Milkyway galaxy.    Given various names, Silver Dollar Galaxy, Sliver Coin Galaxy or simply by its number in the New General Catalogue, NGC 253, it is most commonly called the Sculptor Galaxy and we owe its discovery to the first female professional astronomer.

IMG_1461.JPG.8f013bf0a3eb6379abea975a5c73daaa.JPG Caroline Herschel ( 1750 - 1848 )

 

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IMG_1517.JPG.7b36a9476d23ed5ed471c82f0e21ed19.JPG ( link )

 

( 1782 - 1783 )

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H V.1
Observed ( by WH ): 30 Oct 1784
128 minutes, 17 seconds following and 1 degree, 39 minutes north of  referenced star 
Description:
- cB: "confidently bright"
- mE: "much extended:
- sp: "south preceding"
- nf: "north following"
-mbF: "much brighter middle"
- size: 50' x 7 or 8'

from:

IMG_1520.JPG.c59f189cc06f29711033fe8a472af0d7.JPG ( link )

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The location reference to H V.1 ( NGC 253 ) in William Hershel's catalogue is in relation to a star found in Flamsteed's Catalogue, 18 Pis. Aust., which is #18 in Piscis Austrainus or Epsilon PsA, the 4th magnitude star HD214748 ( HIP111954 )  ( source )

IMG_1523.thumb.JPG.ab89ae49c39d36341059bef34c35987e.JPG

Plate from "Atlas Coelestis" by John Flamsteed, 1646-1719 )

 

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William Herschel found favour with the King and was granted a position as Royal Astronomer to George III in 1782.  Shortly after, William and Caroline moved from Bath to Datchet ( near Windsor ) and took up residency in a rented house which, whilst somewhat delapadated and damp, had ample accommodation and fields for William to construct and deploy the large telescopes he wished to build.  It was in these grounds that Caroline set up her "Sweeper" to look for comets and doing so also discovered a number of 'nebulae' including ( in 1783 ) what was later to become known as the Sculptor Galaxy.

IMG_1535.JPG.1d37f5eb69e71e674b5e3c69c1b68438.JPG

( The Herschel house at Datchet near Windsor )

 

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( The Lawn, Horton Road, Slough ( Datchet ) - Google Maps )

 

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Caroline Herschel's "Sweeper" was a 27" focal length Newtonian telescope that was supported in a kind of altitude-azimuth mount consisting of a rotating table and a small gantry and pulley system that was used to effect altitude adjustments by sliding the tube up and down against a board used to provide stability.  There has been some conjecture as to the exact details of the construction, however the image below, even if perhaps not the actual instrument, gives an indication of the overal design philosophy. 

IMG_1530.JPG.054a208e167b34309760ce71bc149444.JPG

Late in her life Caroline Herschel recorded details of her telescope in a booklet titled "My little Newtonian sweeper":

IMG_1546.JPG.c2ab9c42e9c627adbbbf30bf59a0e5c6.JPG

In her memoir, Caroline Herschel describes the performance of her observations as the conducting of "horizontal sweeps"; from which one might assume the task consisted of setting the altitude in accordance with the plan for the night's observing and then slowing rotating the top of the table in azimuth as one observed and noted down the objects that passed across the view in the eyepiece.  However, with the arrival of this new "telescopic sweeper" in the middle of 1783, Caroline Herschel added the new method of sweeping in the vertical, as noted below in an extract from her observing book ( source for both extracts: "Caroline Herschel as observer", Michael Hoskin, Journal for the History of Astronomy, 2005 )

IMG_1549.JPG.7b74f3f52aa2218c76a11b2a2f396925.JPG

 

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The achievement of her discovery of the 'nebula' in the Sculptor constellation was remarkable in so many ways; not the least of which being the low path in the sky that the Sculptor galaxy follows when observed from Datchet in southern England - which on the night of her observation would not have exceeded 12 degrees or so above the horizon.

Today, 234 years later, and blessed with 21st century luxuries and conveniences, I write on my IPAD and flip over to my planetarium application, SkySafari, and model the sky as it was seen by Caroline Herschel from near her house on the 23rd of September, 1783 ...

 

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( SkySafari by Simulation Curriculum )

 

 

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Mike I do enjoy reading the history of astronomy. There is a book retailer in the UK (The Works) that sells new books but at a greatly reduced price. This book 'The Comet Seeker' was selling a few weeks ago for just £2 so I bought it.

book001.jpg

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