Jump to content

Welcome to Stargazers Lounge
Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more. If you already have an account, login here - otherwise create an account for free today!
Photo

Does the Gravity from jupiter affects earth in any way?

- - - - -

  • Please log in to reply
16 replies to this topic

#1
lulaz

lulaz

    Nebula

  • New Members
  • 39 posts
  • Location: São Paulo, Brazil
I'm a novice in astronomy, so I don't know anything about mathematics and only a few things about fisics... But I want to know if the jupiter's gravity do anything on earth, like the moon affects the tide of the oceans?

Thanks in advance!!!

#2
FraserClarke

FraserClarke

    Proto Star

  • Advanced Members
  • 990 posts
  • Location: Oxon
Jupiter, and all the other planets, affect the Earth slightly. Their gravity changes the orbit slightly, causes a very small contribution to tides, etc. But the size of the effects are very very small.

#3
brianb

brianb

    Red Dwarf

  • Advanced Members
  • 4,840 posts
  • Location: 55.215N 6.554W

Jupiter, and all the other planets, affect the Earth slightly. Their gravity changes the orbit slightly, causes a very small contribution to tides, etc. But the size of the effects are very very small.

Yes. So far as orbits are concerned, the effect is proportional to the mass and inversely proportional to the square of the distance ... so Jupiter, which is 1/1000 of the mass of the sun but is on average 5 times as far away, has about 1/25000 of the effect of the sun on the earth's orbit. Not much but not inconsiderable either.

In the case of tides, the effect is inversely proportional to the cube of the distance (differentiate x^-2...) Jupiter is approximately 25000 times the mass of the moon, but is 2000 times as far away, so Jupiter's tidal effect is 25000/8000000000, or 3 parts in a million, of that of the moon ... whereas the Sun's tidal effect is approximately 25000000/64000000 or 40% of that of the moon (the Sun is 25 million times the mass of the moon but 400 times as distant).

#4
Lerxst

Lerxst

    Nebula

  • Validating
  • 91 posts
  • Location: Norway
Unless you believe in astrology, where Jupiter not only affects the Earth's orbit, but also your economy, intimate relationship and your where and when you go on vacation.

Edited by Lerxst, 21 November 2010 - 08:00 PM.

N 59° 57.029', E 10° 59.397'
Sky-Watcher Skyliner 300P 12" GOTO dobsonian
Explore Scientific 20mm, 14mm & 9mm 100°, William Optics SWAN 33mm 2" eyepieces, 2" TS barlow, 2" Lumicon moon filter, 2" Lumicon OIII filter

#5
brianb

brianb

    Red Dwarf

  • Advanced Members
  • 4,840 posts
  • Location: 55.215N 6.554W

Jupiter not only affects the Earth's orbit, but also your economy, intimate relationship and your where and when you go on vacation.

Of course it does ... if you let it!

#6
lulaz

lulaz

    Nebula

  • New Members
  • 39 posts
  • Location: São Paulo, Brazil

Unless you believe in astrology, where Jupiter not only affects the Earth's orbit, but also your economy, intimate relationship and your where and when you go on vacation.


hahaha I knew it!!! Thats why my gf broke up with me!!! =P

#7
Macavity

Macavity

    Red Dwarf

  • Advanced Members
  • 4,904 posts
I sense it brings little Joviality to the astronomical community. :)
Chris / Macavity

Skywatchers: ST102, MAK150. TS 8" / F4 Photo-Newt for Video Astronomy
Alexanders Obsy, HEQ5, Watec 120N+, Baader Hypes, TS HR Planetaries...

#8
ollypenrice

ollypenrice

    Supernova

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 20,033 posts
  • Location: South east France, Lat 44.19N.
One thing that might affect us is that Jovian gravity hoovers up lots of nasty potential impactoros.
Olly

Run Les Granges Astronomy Holidays, teach and learn imaging, SE France.  TEC140 apo on Avalon Liner FR. 2xTakahashi FSQ106 tandem on Mesu mount 200.  TeleVue Pronto, ZS66, 6 inch achro. Other mounts, Takahashi EM200, 2 x EQ6. TeleVue Gibraltar and TelePod. CCD; 2xAtik11000 full frame, SXVH36, Atik 320E, Lodestar, DMK21. Leica bins. This kit is co-owned owned with Tom O'Donoghue and Yves Van den Broek. Host 4 scope robotic shed. www.sunstarfrance.com

Isn't it great that amateurs can get so close to the universe?


#9
siovene

siovene

    Nebula

  • Members
  • 71 posts
  • Location: Espoo, Finland

I sense it brings little Joviality to the astronomical community. :)


ZING!

You're not uploading your images on www.astrobin.com? With all due respect, that's insane!

My astronomy blog.
My gallery on the awesomeness that is AstroBin.

#10
gordyb

gordyb

    Nebula

  • Members
  • 67 posts
  • Location: Gateshead
I am sure the gravitational force of Jupiter extends all the way to Saturn.

#11
Neilius

Neilius

    Star Forming

  • Advanced Members
  • 366 posts
  • Location: West Yorks, UK
Jupiters magnetic field is the largest 'object' in the solar system

#12
yeti monster

yeti monster

    White Dwarf

  • Advanced Members
  • 3,988 posts
  • Location: UK & China

One thing that might affect us is that Jovian gravity hoovers up lots of nasty potential impactoros.
Olly


Let's not forget those that might otherwise miss us, were Jupiter not to alter their trajectories to put them on a collision course with Earth...

Edited by yeti monster, 17 December 2010 - 06:50 AM.

Ask not what your god can do for you, ask instead, what can you do for yourself.

North West Englandshire, near some other forumeers but far away from others. Also rather close to an astronomy centre. Occasionally in the South China sea too.

An entire forest of telescopes, whopping HUGE 20x80 binos, a veritable plethora of EPs, collimators, star charts and wild ideas. And a HUGE, mean, evil and downright bad tempered dawg. :rolleyes:

#13
Demonperformer

Demonperformer

    White Dwarf

  • Advanced Members
  • 3,322 posts
  • Location: 51-ish N; 1-ish W

Let's not forget those that might otherwise miss us, were Jupiter not to alter their trajectories to put them on a collision course with Earth...


Are you, by any chance, a 'glass half empty' person:)?

It really does matter to a civilized society that we treat arguments on their merits, and do not judge them according to their source.

Truth does not become more true by virtue of the fact that the entire world agrees with it, nor less so even if the whole world disagrees with it.

Professing themselves to be wise, they became fools.

For best results, follow maker's instructions

DP


#14
yeti monster

yeti monster

    White Dwarf

  • Advanced Members
  • 3,988 posts
  • Location: UK & China
My glass is either full or empty, or somewhere in between, depending on what stage of drinking or refilling I am at. :)
Ask not what your god can do for you, ask instead, what can you do for yourself.

North West Englandshire, near some other forumeers but far away from others. Also rather close to an astronomy centre. Occasionally in the South China sea too.

An entire forest of telescopes, whopping HUGE 20x80 binos, a veritable plethora of EPs, collimators, star charts and wild ideas. And a HUGE, mean, evil and downright bad tempered dawg. :rolleyes:

#15
brianb

brianb

    Red Dwarf

  • Advanced Members
  • 4,840 posts
  • Location: 55.215N 6.554W

that might otherwise miss us, were Jupiter not to alter their trajectories to put them on a collision course with Earth...

You can simulate this ... for comets falling in from the Kuiper belt or Ooort cloud, Jupiter "catches" 100 times as many as the Earth eventually does, in fact there is a fair chance that the first encounter with Jupiter will chuck such an interloper right out of the solar system altogether. So although it is possible that Jupiter may cause an otherwise harmless object to strike the Earth, on the whole its effect if far more protective than destructive.

#16
vesper

vesper

    Nebula

  • Members
  • 67 posts
  • Location: uk, north yorkshire
I think I read some where that Jupiters gravitational force has the ability to deflect large objects on a crash course towards earth :(

#17
brantuk

brantuk

    Super Giant

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPip
  • 13,022 posts
  • Location: Leicester
Put it this way - I've not been hit on the head by anything from space yet - so I'm assuming Jupiters doing it's job. I've also not won the lottery yet - so I reckon Jupiters having a gravitational effect on the balls that have my numbers on them lol :(

CPC-925, AZEQ6 GT, 16" Lightbridge, AA 115EDT, 200P, LS60Tha B1200 DS60 PT, Meg72, Tal 100RS, SW  127 Mak, ST80, Skytee-2, SPC900 SC1.5, Canon10x42 L IS WP, 1000D (unmod'ed), 314L+ Mono, SX Efw, Lodestar.
Member of East Midlands Stargazers - EMS

 

Quote: "When you can take the pea from my hand Glasshopper, you will be ready to leave the monastery. But if you just take the p.... we'll kick you out".





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users