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First light with PST

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15 replies to this topic

#1
Daniel_Reardon

Daniel_Reardon

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Hi all,

I just got my PST and Skywatcher AZ3 mount. I quickly set it up and took some snaps with my neximage and celestron barlow (the one from the cheap eyepiece kit). Unfortunately there were some high level clouds which made it impossible to focus (combined with the point that it was hard to focus anyway). Despite this, I got 2 snaps of a couple of sunspots (below). I desaturated one of them which brought out a prominence. If anyone has some tips about getting better images I'd be glad to hear them. I think I will get an imaging source DBK (I've heard you can use them in the PST without a barlow) in a week or so, that should give me better detail at 640x480. I was also thinking of getting an APO barlow as well, because this one isn't great. Picture album below.

Thanks
- Daniel

http://imgur.com/a/YZXlF

#2
Merlin66

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Add a "Vegemite precise focuser" to the PST knob - any largish knurled lid would do if you've run out of Vegemite ;-)
A DMK mono camera will give much better results for Ha - there's no colour to record only data!
You don't need an APO barlow for a PST, or any other Ha system. The bandwidth is so tight (< 1A) it is monochromatic.
"Astronomical Spectroscopy-The Final Frontier" -to boldly go where few amateurs have gone before.

C11, NEQ6pro, DMK41AF04, ATik314L+, 1000D modded, SM60DS/BF15, 102mmPST, Spectra-L200 and other Spectroscope(s).
"Astronomical Spectroscopy for Amateurs", "Grating Spectroscopes -How to use them" - Springer
http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/astronomical_spectroscopy/

#3
Daniel_Reardon

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Fantastic, thanks for the info! I was considering a DMK but I'd like to use it for the planets too, and I don't think I want to use (or buy) a filter wheel at this stage.

- Daniel

#4
Merlin66

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Life is always a compromise........
"Astronomical Spectroscopy-The Final Frontier" -to boldly go where few amateurs have gone before.

C11, NEQ6pro, DMK41AF04, ATik314L+, 1000D modded, SM60DS/BF15, 102mmPST, Spectra-L200 and other Spectroscope(s).
"Astronomical Spectroscopy for Amateurs", "Grating Spectroscopes -How to use them" - Springer
http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/astronomical_spectroscopy/

#5
Daniel_Reardon

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I suppose the grey-scale images aren't forever, I could easily get a filter wheel later on. I do however have the red, blue and light green filters that came with my Celestron eyepiece and filter kit. Would I be able to use those to get some colour?

Cheers
- Daniel
[SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

#6
Merlin66

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Daniel,
In Ha there's no "real" colour - I suppose if you were to use a colour CCD then the recorded image would come up deep red.....
With a mono it's much easier...just collect the data, process it as best you can to get maximum detail then apply any colour you want!
(That's why you see published Ha images in "glowing gold" "swirling yellow" "burnt orange" etc etc You can pick any colour scheme you like.)

Edited by Merlin66, 07 May 2012 - 09:47 AM.

"Astronomical Spectroscopy-The Final Frontier" -to boldly go where few amateurs have gone before.

C11, NEQ6pro, DMK41AF04, ATik314L+, 1000D modded, SM60DS/BF15, 102mmPST, Spectra-L200 and other Spectroscope(s).
"Astronomical Spectroscopy for Amateurs", "Grating Spectroscopes -How to use them" - Springer
http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/astronomical_spectroscopy/

#7
Daniel_Reardon

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Yeah I realise that, I was referring to using the DMK for planetary stuff (sorry, should have been more clear). I am completely sold that the DMK is the camera I want for solar imaging but I do also want to new camera for planetary stuff and I'd like that in colour.

Cheers

Edited by Daniel_Reardon, 07 May 2012 - 09:19 AM.

[SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

#8
Merlin66

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I'll let the "dark side" guys comment on the filters...usually it's an RGB set which are different from the "eyepiece" filters.....
"Astronomical Spectroscopy-The Final Frontier" -to boldly go where few amateurs have gone before.

C11, NEQ6pro, DMK41AF04, ATik314L+, 1000D modded, SM60DS/BF15, 102mmPST, Spectra-L200 and other Spectroscope(s).
"Astronomical Spectroscopy for Amateurs", "Grating Spectroscopes -How to use them" - Springer
http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/astronomical_spectroscopy/

#9
JamieW

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Hi Daniel, I have found the best aid to focusing is shade. It's so difficult otherwise, if all you can see is glare.
@Darkside Tal 100RS. @Lightside Lunt LS60 THa B1200
SOLI INVICTO COMITI

#10
Daniel_Reardon

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Yes this is true, the computer screen was hard to see, I'll have to use an umbrella next time too!
[SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

#11
Montana

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An excellent start! seeing yesterday made focusing a real trial. For solar you will get much better pictures with a DMK. If you use a colour chip you will only be using a third of your available pixels (red) making your picture much lower in quality. It depends on your passion, solar or planets? DMK or DBK? take your pick or get a filter wheel and RGB set.

Alexandra

Photos http://www.flickr.co...tos/alexandra4/ and blog solarnutcase.livejournal.com


#12
Daniel_Reardon

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Yeah thanks Alexandra, I'm just trying to pick that now. I think I will go for a DMK. I actually won't get a chance to do proper planetary photography for another 6 months. So at the moment, solar photography is my priority. I can get a filter wheel later on.

Thanks
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#13
Daniel_Reardon

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Done it! Just ordered a DMK 21AU618.AS, thanks all. I will get a filter wheel later on and use it for my planetary stuff too. I'll get back to you with some results when I get a clear day.

Thanks
- Daniel
[SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

#14
tjensen

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Hi Daniel,

I just got my PST last week so I'm learning too. This forum is chock full of wisdom!

I'm really impressed by this little telescope.

I am using a Flea3 for planetary, so have a filter wheel and colour filter set. The RGB colours for tri colour imaging are different than for visual, so you'll need to fork out some cash... but you can certainly take great monochrome images of the planets too. And don't forget the moon (though a near IR helps).

You realize that we've really gotten into trouble... sacrificing sleep to image planets and now it'll be work to image the sun!

Enjoy the new scope.
Cheers
Tim
C14, LX200GPS 10", HyperStar, PST 40
Canon T2i, Flea3

#15
Daniel_Reardon

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Thanks Tim,

That reminds me of another question I had. How does one actually make a colour image using a filter wheel?
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#16
tjensen

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Hey Daniel,

To make an RGB colour image from monochrome, you shoot one image thru each of the three filters, then combine them. The intensity of the images represents the intensity of the individual colours inthe image. So when you merge them, you get a colour image. Photoshop, ImagesPlus, IRIS, AstroArt, etc all have features that allow for combining monochrome filtered images to form an RGB colour image.

Hope that made some sense...
Cheers
Tim
C14, LX200GPS 10", HyperStar, PST 40
Canon T2i, Flea3




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