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getting rid of floaters

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67 replies to this topic

#1
richbyers

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eye floaters- anyone else tired of them...looking at plato, and all i can see is this (relatively) huge thing howvering in my field of view

;) not a happy chappy

any tips?

rich
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#2
eddy

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Its basically debris within the eye itself (vitreous humour) dont think there is a lot that will help (i could be wrong). Maybe speak with an optician, he/she could probably help a lot with tips etc ;)
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#3
eddy

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Are they floaters though? lol

Do you have blue dots or squiggles?
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#4
acey

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Nothing you can do about them, and they get worse with age. Just think of them as part of the atmosphere, and try to concentrate on what you're looking at, rather than what you're looking through.

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#5
iwatkins

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I get a few now and then.

I find it better if you view with your head level rather than looking down into an eyepiece.

Cheers

Ian

#6
richbyers

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theyre squiggles...on that note im on mediaction which can (in some cases) cause cataracts- do you think that has anything to do with the increase im noticing from a year ago?
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#7
eddy

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Could do, certain medication is known to increase floaters, what medication are you on? (if its personal please dont answer)

But yeah that may be a cause/reason for them to get worse
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#8
richbyers

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nah im not bothered ;) its seroquel, nasty stuff, and it causes eye twitching, so im doomed i think :)
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#9
eddy

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oo quetiapine lol

I wouldnt quite cache is nasty, but yeah, needed as such i imagine ;) I dont think quetiapine would cause floaters and the only other option is surgery id imagine, so yep, doomed...along with a lot of us.

Im 29 and i have a lot of floaters to so your not alone! :)
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#10
richbyers

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oh well, never mind. not the end of the world...ill consider them my observing buddies!!
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#11
eddy

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Best thing to do ;)
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#12
sunshine185

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Using binoviewers helps greatly. Less stress on one eye.
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#13
gooseholla

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I have them in various forms - big black lines, small 'scratch' patterns of lines, blobs of grey etc... and I'm only 26! I've had them for years - looking at the sky or a blank wall is a no no! They are annoying, but alas, nothing much can be done. Surgery can be performed if it is EXTREME, but is best left alone.

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#14
richbyers

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im 21, so must be bad haha
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#15
661-pete

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I've had them for nearly 40 years (since my 20s) and my optician says they're quite stable and harmless, and I can testify they don't tend to get worse as you get older (at least, not for me). After all those years one gets used to them and is able to 'work around' them.

Not an ideal answer I know, but I would suggest, if your optician says leave them be, take that advice.
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#16
richbyers

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ive already been told off once this week by mods...so im behaving myself!!
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#17
Star Gazer

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Floaters can be removed, but there are risks associated with this procedure. A surgeon will only operate it they are particularly bad.

[URL="http://<a href="http://www.sapphire-eyecare.co.uk/floaters/understanding.htm" target="_blank">http://www.sapphire-...tanding.htm</a>"]http://www.sapphire-...derstanding.htm[/URL]

#18
M4lcs67

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I have had a large one in my left eye for years and I have a lazy right eye, so basically I am screwed.
I usually just blink a few times and move my eyeball around to move the floater to the side so I can actually see.
I have come to deal with them however irritating they may seem.

Edited by M4lcs67, 02 April 2012 - 04:58 PM.

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#19
Moonshane

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I tend to see them only on the moon so not too bad. I suspect that exit pupils is something that makes them seem worse - i.e. smaller exit pupil = more floaters visible.

Don't think, feel! It is like a finger pointing a way to the moon.

Don't concentrate on the finger or you will miss all that heavenly glory. Do you understand?

(Bruce Lee in Enter the Dragon)

It applies to eyepieces too

 

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#20
Qualia

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I think floaters are a pretty normal phenomenon and I'd be surprised if folk have never experienced them before.

In Spanish they're commonly called 'moscas volando' which means something like, 'flying flies' and I've heard that unless they're very dark in kind, very, very dark, there is absolutely nothing to worry about. They're absolutely natural.

On the old wife's tale front, I've heard that eye drops may help and that gazing at the moon for a few minutes each day may also help. Who knows?

Edited by Qualia, 02 April 2012 - 05:02 PM.

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